Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,385 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Half Nelson
Lowest review score: 0 The Last House on the Left
Score distribution:
5,385 movie reviews
  1. The film hinges on too many conventional crises (a car accident, a divorce), but the fact that Burns is better at atmosphere than story isn't all bad.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    First Descent is not as eloquent, and thus not as electrifying, as Stacy Peralta's "Dogtown and Z-Boys" or "Riding Giants," the two jock docs it's clearly modeled after. No matter: Visually, MD Films offers up a sugar rush.
  2. Disoriented but occasionally disarming saga packed with moments out of an ''Alice in Wonderland'' adventure, a stalker thriller, and a condensed season of TV's ''Big Brother.''
  3. Windtalkers blows this way and that, but there's no mistaking the filmmaker in the tall grass, true to himself.
  4. Contraband, while often grungy and far-fetched, does keep you watching. And in January, that's recommendation enough.
  5. In the title role, Michael Peña has a no-nonsense fire: He captures how Chavez borrowed from Martin Luther King Jr. but also fueled the struggle with his own improvisatory brilliance.
  6. Predictable, corny, and mild.
  7. 300
    Look, but don't be touched: There is much to see but little to remember in this telling of a battle we are meant never to forget.
  8. Gregg doesn’t possess the moral rot needed to crawl into the Willy Loman muck, and the film’s dialogue is Glengarry lite, but Saxon Sharbino, as an enigmatic tween actor, is just as the movie claims: the real deal.
  9. And so by the time the pair admire the Grand Canyon and, Due Date has lost its way, relying on its leading men to lead by charisma alone, even though their characters have nowhere interesting to go besides the happily-ever-after of dull, responsible male maturity.
  10. Shrewd, tough, and lively -- a junior-league "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."
  11. The movie is sensationally exciting, but its hey-kids-let s-put-on-a-war! story line plays like Beverly Hills, 90210 recast as a military-recruitment film for the Third Reich.
  12. The Net is an efficient, workmanlike thriller that, at its best, does a canny job of exploiting the more fanciful edges of computer-age dread.
  13. Reveling in mess and homegrown multiracial mayhem, Death at a Funeral finds a new lease on life.
  14. Although the film's frenetic rhythm is reminiscent of an "Indiana Jones" picture, visually Schumacher directs it like a musical, turning each image into eye candy, weaving one lush set piece into the next, as if he were the Vincente Minnelli of blockbusters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    If British writer-director Jez Butterworth had let his sophomore picture get as dirty as Kidman's game recklessness invited -- she started this before ''Moulin Rouge'' and ''The Others'' -- he would have served up a tasty piece of cake.
  15. Think Like a Man is so busy tracking courtship as if it were a science project that the bite-size love stories lack spontaneity.
  16. The two stars are like cool kids pretending to be tortured poets pretending to be cool. Neither can match the screen presence — the shameless self-infatuated ebullience — of Matthew Lillard, who does a wickedly grotesque turn as Brock Hudson, a kind of goggle-eyed Puck manqué in the film's dead-on send-up of "The Real World."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Everyone's Hero re-creates Depression-era America with surprisingly agreeable anachronistic panache, but a sassy ball and bat don't cut it as compelling cartoon characters, and the not-so-human humans never quite do either (Babe Ruth looks like Shrek).
  17. The villainous Polluter-in-Chief is eloquently played by Robert Knepper, familiarly loathsome as T-Bag on Fox's "Prison Break." And when Knepper and Statham get together, there's a fine showdown of grimaces.
  18. A little of this sort of thing goes a long way, but no one does it better than Myers.
  19. That Griffin tells some of the most intolerant jokes since Andrew Dice Clay should hardly obscure his talent, even if it does tarnish it.
  20. Bears the weight of too many genres jostling for screen time.
  21. The hilarious Malkovich, coiffed in an artful pageboy and savoring a fruity French accent, would overpower the competition on sheer thespian madness.
  22. Has a loosey-goosey, what-the-hell spirit that's easy and fun to hook into.
  23. Even Helen Mirren, the Queen Midas of class acting, can’t fix this well-intentioned miss.
  24. The director, Tom Kalin, stages acid duels, but he should have provided more psychological structure. Though Moore, a great actress, turns fury into verbal music, we're never quite sure what's driving her.
  25. Natalie Portman demonstrates tour de force weeping in the back of a taxi as an American searching for her roots in Israel.
  26. I'm as touched and charmed by its failures as I am transfixed, at times, by its successful inventiveness and audacity.
  27. Where the movie falters is in sustaining the tricky balance between pastoral life lessons and creepy suspense.

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