Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,709 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Chelsea Handler: Uganda Be Kidding Me: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Pauly D Project: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1295
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1295
1,295 tv reviews
  1. Gritty-smart horror that nicely complements BBC America's sci-fi sensation Orphan Black. [9 May 2014, p.57]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. It may sound like your typical procedural--but by part 1's cliff-hanger ending, it clearly isn't and the very intense Tennant deserves much of the credit for that. [13 Jun 2014, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. This sitcom is simply infectious. [4 Jul 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  4. As the title suggests, the wit and heart of the show are available to all.
  5. It's a very funny show about how hard it is realizing you've become a cliché: the useless husband, the naggy wife, the insufferable couple on the sitcom.
  6. A megawatt start to a show crackling with megaton ambition.
  7. What makes it just plain good is the escapist fun of a romance told uncommonly well.
  8. The show was created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, but it's Soderbergh's vision, from the brilliant but unusual score (minimalist electronic music) to the wry camera angles (the series opens on Owen's shoes as he lounges in a brothel). For a period piece, it's strikingly contemporary--and quite gory, although the surgery scenes never feel gratuitous.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The show's best tension comes from the awesome/awful self-awareness that plagues the directors as they attempt to make a film while being very much filmed themselves.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the series could get preachy, it's tempered, and above all, the whole thing's just a lot of fun.
  9. Without surging too deep into soapy territory, Kingdom grinds out excellent family drama via lived-in characters and escalating stakes. The cast's chemistry is phenomenal, with Jonas as the standout.
  10. MasterChef Junior exults in the joy of cooking, the joy of childhood, and the joy of treating people decently.
  11. The most visceral moments emerge from Buscemi's conversations with his former colleagues and lifelong friends at Engine Co. 55, rendering vivid and tearful accounts of tragedies.
  12. The Game is next-level entertainment, courtesy of smart scripts and a cast of finely drawn characters.
  13. Like a James Brown show, the result is both generously proportioned and extremely tight.
  14. Some weeks, the series works beautifully, moving along like the otherworldly detective show it's meant to be. ... But other times Angel can tip too far into jokiness—or, worse, come off like a supernatural version of hollow USA Network shows such as Silk Stalkings.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The action is swift, the characters lively.
  15. I'll miss Grissom, but welcome Langston's brusque authority: lotsa possibilities for friction with the prickly CSI crew.
  16. The X-Files is the most paranoid, subversive show on TV right now...Filled with florid dialogue (''You've seen things that weren't meant to be seen!'') and not-bad special effects, X-Files is a hoot about hooey.
  17. So far, Martin and Daphne have been good for a few solid laughs per show,but the indispensable costar has proven to be Frasier's brother, Niles, played by David Hyde Pierce.
  18. In its portrayal of novice docs under pressure, ER may remind you of St. Elsewhere, but with less of the quirkiness that made Elsewhere both brilliant and annoying.
  19. The weakest aspect of Seinfeld is a wacky next-door neighbor played by Michael Richards. Richards is doing little more than an impersonation of Christopher Lloyd's Jim on Taxi, and he ought to cut it out.
  20. Carey himself is a fidgety guy. He doesn't just deliver a line — he kind of dances around it, shifting his weight from one foot to the other. At first I found this, combined with his habit of looking down and grinning fixedly when he speaks to someone, pretty annoying. But his lines are so amusing and his timing so sharp that I've come to like Carey's anti-acting style.
  21. The season's cleverest, most intricate sitcom.
  22. Viewers who don't know a Trekker from a Tribble may nevertheless be drawn into the orbit of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the latest, darkest, and densest TV Star Trek yet. If the original Trek is the Old Testament of television science fiction and Star Trek: The Next Generation its New Testament, then Deep Space Nine is the Apocrypha — mysterious variations on Trek lore that work as ripping tales in their own right.
  23. It's a little gimmicky, but it works, primarily on the strength of the cast.
  24. Wolf has put snappin' Jack at the center of some of the best episodes of the immortal series' 19th season.
  25. The premiere episode of Dharma & Greg delivers rather more than you might expect; it has the zing of a '30s screwball comedy.
  26. The Practice has the goods to be a don't-miss show.
  27. While Everybody doesn't yet have top-notch writing, Romano manages to communicate something distinctive: He plays a beleaguered family man, but one who's happy about it. Not a dope and not a weasel, he's a fellow accepting his responsibilities. Ain't that unusual?

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