Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,879 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1434
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1434
1,434 tv reviews
  1. The plots are twistier than a fishtail braid and only lag when the conversation turns to energy. [25 Jan/1 Feb 2013, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. Hannibal takes our own fixation on psycho-pop and serves it back to us in a dish full of flavor. Bon appétit, horror freaks.
  3. The most compelling characters in season 3 are the gentleladies.
  4. This series has survived its 15 media minutes as The Hot New Show to become a dependably clever, sexy, sometimes even touching sitcom.
  5. The biggest worry with The Nine is that its mystery will start to crumble after a dozen episodes or so. But for now, it's one smooth, creepy, cool operation.
  6. Any show that can accommodate decadent cruelty, tragic bravery, and political divisiveness is one you ought to be watching, frakkin' spaceships or not.
  7. Host Nate Berkus grounds it all with the real families whose lives are being transformed. [21 Mar 2014, p.59]
  8. Against all odds, Sports Night is a home run, a hole in one, a touchdown — at once the most consistently funny, intelligent, and emotional of any new-season series.
  9. This peter Berg-produced show is filmed in a low-key style that makes Roach's life seem all the more dramatic. [27 Jan 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  10. It is possible to argue that, although Louis C.K. has created a work of genius with the FX show Louie, what he's really good at is stand-up. Oh My God offers further evidence for the thesis.
  11. King has turned out to be a near-perfect synthesis of Seinfeld and [Everybody Loves] Raymond, recombining many of the best elements of each show into something wholly, delightfully new.
  12. Less action-packed than BSG, but still awash in the familiar themes of life, loss, identity, and big frakkin' robots with guns.
  13. It's a slower-paced, smaller-scale show about the sad reality of sticking it out in Hollywood into middle age. It also veers into weirder territory that would feel impossible outside California. But thanks to the chemistry between Peet and Zissis, it's endlessly engrossing.
  14. As always, Saunders is heroic in her slapstick self-abasement, and Lumley is extraordinary as a pained, haughty beauty gone to glorious seed.
  15. Fringe seems to be going out as alt-world fantasy/sci-fi at its most tough-minded yet humanistic. [5 Oct 2012, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. There are no big sociopolitical statements here, no guerilla-style confrontations, no scenes of squirmy awkwardness, no multilayered pop culture references. It's just a very smart, very funny show.
  17. Sex and violence certainly have their place here, but they're placed in the context of a vivid city that, as dangerous, seamy, and profane as it can be, is a place you want to revisit every week.
  18. The reason for CSI's success is that it combines a few time-tested TV elements in a fresh way.
  19. Filled with more shoulder pads than an episode of The Golden Girls, the special is actually at its best between songs when Gaga dishes out hilarious asides like "The only thing better than a unicorn is a gay unicorn."
  20. It may sound like your typical procedural--but by part 1's cliff-hanger ending, it clearly isn't and the very intense Tennant deserves much of the credit for that. [13 Jun 2014, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. Tim Gunn still motherhens the designers, the dramatic arcs feel familiar (one designer is a recovering addict, another gave up a career as a surgeon), and--wonders to behold--there's even a branch of the fabric store Mood in Runway's new Los Angeles home.
  22. It's another level of pop culture wizardry to make such storytelling seem so vivid, so vital, and just plain fun.
  23. If the joke is that these guys are deluded hacks, what makes the joke work is that Black (Mars Attacks!) and Gass (The Cable Guy) commit to their material with the demented vigor of true artistes, and they also write and perform really terrific 'bad' songs.
  24. A must-see for fans of Broadway's favorite redheaded orphan.
  25. This dark-tinged show is frequently very funny, never more so than when the pals gather for a diner meal, to whine and tease one another. The dialogue has a cutting crispness; the hour zips along, no matter how logy its antiheroes may become.
  26. The premiere jumps the series from 1960 to 1962, but it plays coy with most of last season's cliff-hangers, including the whereabouts of Peggy's son with married exec Pete Campbell (played with oily brilliance by Vincent Kartheiser). It's quite a tease, but the debut proves Mad Men is as smart as ever
  27. Jennifer Saunders' Edina and Joanna Lumley's Patsy are as deliciously delusional as ever in the Britcom's 20th-anniversary special.
  28. The result is thirtysomething crossed with The Waltons — and I mean that as a compliment.
  29. Juggling the themes of famine, fame, and family, Torchwood: Miracle Day--conceived by series creator Russell T Davies, with some episodes written by Buffy and Dollhouse vet Jane Espenson--makes a smooth transatlantic shift that will, I hope, broaden this marvelous, tense fantasy franchise's audience.
  30. The first two episodes contain strong subplots about staff downsizing and rolled-back pensions, indicators that Ted is doing a better job of folding real-life resonances into its silliness.

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