Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,939 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Dead Set: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1481
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1481
1,481 tv reviews
  1. 'Firefly' benefits enormously from Whedon's ability to take the clichés of any genre and give them a good, hard yank.
  2. There's a pleasing integrity in how P&T expose the other hopefuls without spoiling the abracadabra. [25 Jul/1 Aug 2014, p.108]
  3. The result is formulaic but fun. [25 Jul/1 Aug 2014, p.105]
  4. Fascinating, frustrating, and a little frightening.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    After a riveting pilot, this third episode is more of a run-of-the-mill procedural, but thanks to the charismatic Tom Cruise-y Barrowman, this Captain Jack will get you bi tonight. [21 Sep 2007, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. It’s a relief to find that Fresh Off the Boat is not only genuinely funny and surprisingly broad but also a little bit subversive.
  6. She navigates the sharky waters of high school, friends, mean cheerleaders, and cute boys with a snarky voice-over that makes her--and Awkward.--easy to fall in love with.
  7. There's plenty to enjoy in this period drama. [28 Sep 2012, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  8. Oka is pure delight as a wage slave who's broken the space-time continuum, and... Grunberg shines as a telepathic cop. [29 Sep 2006, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. The movie goes on a bit too long, but it makes up for it with finely tuned performances.
  10. Despite all the repetition and longueurs, this Downton Abbey frequently works, as the first one did, as a peppery little trifle.
  11. Really, my only significant complaint about the new '24' is an excessive use of its visual trademark: split-screen images. These are fine when they're used to let you know where major characters are in different subplots simultaneously, but in next week's episode, there's a split-screen shot that separates two characters talking in the same room together!
  12. The pilot is promising, with sharp dialogue, a solid supporting cast, and Kaling's appealing unapologetic protagonist. [28 Sep 2012, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  13. Bornheimer absorbs every setback with such a beaten-puppy air that each fresh misery feels ludicrous, rather than merely annoying. Will it work, (worst) week after (worst) week? With Bornheimer, it's strangely possible. His is a feathery touch on wrecking-ball comedy.
  14. Star knows from nighttime soaps, so his parody of same is savvy, cutting, and delightfully silly.
  15. If you're thinking about how long it'll be before this joke gets old, then you are not alone. Until then, Drunk History is a high-concept riot.
  16. Masters may be set in the 1950s, but its politics don't need to live there as well. Luckily, the conversations between the women are just as juicy as last season.
  17. As the film moves past Sept. 11 and into topics like black sites, waterboarding, and drone warfare, a fascinating schism opens, exposing the existential battle being waged among the agency's own captains for the CIA's soul. [20/27 Nov 2015, p.105]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. The fact that Push Girls borrows heavily from the Real Housewives format is initially worrying, given the sensitive subject matter, but ultimately seems like a savvy, on-the-side-of-the-angels move.
  19. [Braugher and Speedman's] warm chemistry gives this crackling conspiracy thriller a much-needed emotional charge. [28 Sep 2012, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The action is swift, the characters lively.
  20. As uneven as it is, the series is now showcasing some of the best acting on television.
  21. Comedy buffs will enjoy this gushy doc about Steinberg.
  22. Much of The Big C's unoriginal dramatization of cancer concerns is mitigated by the fresh, dynamic performances of Linney and Oliver Platt as husband Adam. [1 Jul 2011, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. The saga of Sookie Stackhouse (the tremulous but sturdy Anna Paquin) and her lovah Bill (slit-eyed Stephen Moyer) gets off to a great, fast start, picking up where last season left off.
  24. The plot--based on a true story--drags, but Walters is a hoot as a prig who thinks she can stave off the swingin' '60s with a wagging finger.
  25. The show is a scrubbed-clean soap. [28 Sep 2012, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  26. It's sassy and smart, but there's a dark acuity to the humor that fits in with MTV's recent edgy efforts like Awkward.
  27. There's merry if repetitive humor in the nuances of [Sutton Foster's character's] physical and digital transformation. [3 Apr 2015, p.58]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  28. Pope, and Cunningham's sardonic performance, provide Skies with some much-needed flashes of sharp humor. Ultimately, though, Falling Skies rises above any one performance; it's the spectacle of humans versus aliens that draws you in.

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