Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,705 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Good Wife: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1292
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1292
1,292 tv reviews
  1. One hopes that producers don't drag out the mystery for too long, because so far The Event delivers, especially its doozy of a climax.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. Devious Patty is still drinking like a fish, while wan Ellen is still seeking her advice (still, Ellen? Really?), and I still will not be able to resist watching every episode I possibly can.
  3. It's in the shooting's emotional reverberations that the show is regenerating after the past few hit-and-miss seasons.
  4. He's always making his audience come up to his level, instead of lowering himself to theirs. He's gonna do just fine. But more Andy, please.
  5. This powerful documentary about the lingering effects of military conflict makes the point that PTSD existed long before we named it.
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The automobile-enthusiast program may lack the British wit of the original series, but it's beautifully shot, just as silly, and nearly as much fun. [26 Nov 2010, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The results is an unapologetically whiny--but funny!--and often plays lika (successful) audition tape for The View.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  6. FNL's final season begins with one person staying put (Taylor Kitsch's Riggins is still in jail) and others moving on (Aimee Teegarden's Julie and Jesse Plemons' Landry are college-bound). Meanwhile, Coach Taylor (Kyle Chandler) heads to the basketball court to find his next star player. [Oct 22/29 2010, p.107]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. At its strongest, it freshens those themes without melodrama, opting instead for slow-boil tension. The challenge for this artful series is whether that boiling point is too slow for viewers raised on WWE Raw and mixed martial arts.
  8. If you find the premiere poky, stick with it: Episodes gets funnier with each succeeding episode, and the acting is superb. Yes: Matt LeBlanc = superb.
  9. Pope, and Cunningham's sardonic performance, provide Skies with some much-needed flashes of sharp humor. Ultimately, though, Falling Skies rises above any one performance; it's the spectacle of humans versus aliens that draws you in.
  10. With its debonair, jump-cut editing, Breaking In is a vigorously original, joke-packed bit of fun that could develop into something special. I'm serious, my Wookiee.
  11. By concentrating on what it means to practice polygamy in the 21st century, the series again comes close to achieving its goal of defining what it means to be a family.
  12. [When] all four of the weirdo personalities arrive in the last few minutes, fully energized and ready to help her navigate her dark ride through academia. It's clear then and there it's gonna be a wonderful season.
  13. Some viewers may find The Killing a little too cold and deliberate, but give it time. Its intensity builds steadily, giving the series unexpected power.
  14. Blood creator Alan Ball knows how to juggle multiple pretty people and knotty, danger-stuffed story lines for the maximum amount of breathless romance and over-the-top action.
  15. Fishburne's gravitas helps do the Supreme Court justice...justice.
  16. If you buy the overwrought emotions so ornately expressed, you'll buy this TV movie's conviction. I was occasionally skeptical, but sold by the terrific performances.
  17. High concept, and yet it works, thanks to solid acting.
  18. Sound gaggy? It's not. Twain is incapable of treacle: She travels, talks, and even sings!
  19. There's all the slamming violence you might want in your gas-fumed escapism, mingled with real-world difficulties.
  20. The sheer, cynical heartlessness of nearly everyone on-screen--from a wonderfully blunt Tony Shalhoub as Morgan Stanley's John Mack to Topher Grace as a calculating Paulson aide--is both dismaying and riveting.
  21. Despite all the repetition and longueurs, this Downton Abbey frequently works, as the first one did, as a peppery little trifle.
  22. Annie Walker tackles a new case--but it feels like a distraction as the Ben mystery continues. [3/10 Jun 2011, p.109]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. Until we find out what happened long ago, we'll just enjoy watching all the beautiful, golden-tanned people say awesomely ridiculous things like: "These guys really put the suck in seersucker."
  24. This show, which reunites the undeniably charming Bilson with The O.C. creator Josh Schwartz, is a goodie that mixes heartstring-tugging moments with lines like this: "There it is. Rock bottom. I just played 'Dixie' with my butt."
  25. Much of The Big C's unoriginal dramatization of cancer concerns is mitigated by the fresh, dynamic performances of Linney and Oliver Platt as husband Adam. [1 Jul 2011, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  26. She navigates the sharky waters of high school, friends, mean cheerleaders, and cute boys with a snarky voice-over that makes her--and Awkward.--easy to fall in love with.
  27. It's the best show on MTV--and one of the best on any network this summer. [6 Jul 2012, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  28. The show can simultaneously unsettle, comfort, excite, and amuse its viewers--something for everyone, if you, like Mr. Finch, like to watch.

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