Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,609 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Big Love: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Ghost Shark: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1212
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1212
1,212 tv reviews
  1. I'll miss Grissom, but welcome Langston's brusque authority: lotsa possibilities for friction with the prickly CSI crew.
  2. The X-Files is the most paranoid, subversive show on TV right now...Filled with florid dialogue (''You've seen things that weren't meant to be seen!'') and not-bad special effects, X-Files is a hoot about hooey.
  3. So far, Martin and Daphne have been good for a few solid laughs per show,but the indispensable costar has proven to be Frasier's brother, Niles, played by David Hyde Pierce.
  4. In its portrayal of novice docs under pressure, ER may remind you of St. Elsewhere, but with less of the quirkiness that made Elsewhere both brilliant and annoying.
  5. The weakest aspect of Seinfeld is a wacky next-door neighbor played by Michael Richards. Richards is doing little more than an impersonation of Christopher Lloyd's Jim on Taxi, and he ought to cut it out.
  6. Carey himself is a fidgety guy. He doesn't just deliver a line — he kind of dances around it, shifting his weight from one foot to the other. At first I found this, combined with his habit of looking down and grinning fixedly when he speaks to someone, pretty annoying. But his lines are so amusing and his timing so sharp that I've come to like Carey's anti-acting style.
  7. The season's cleverest, most intricate sitcom.
  8. Viewers who don't know a Trekker from a Tribble may nevertheless be drawn into the orbit of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the latest, darkest, and densest TV Star Trek yet. If the original Trek is the Old Testament of television science fiction and Star Trek: The Next Generation its New Testament, then Deep Space Nine is the Apocrypha — mysterious variations on Trek lore that work as ripping tales in their own right.
  9. It's a little gimmicky, but it works, primarily on the strength of the cast.
  10. Wolf has put snappin' Jack at the center of some of the best episodes of the immortal series' 19th season.
  11. The premiere episode of Dharma & Greg delivers rather more than you might expect; it has the zing of a '30s screwball comedy.
  12. The Practice has the goods to be a don't-miss show.
  13. While Everybody doesn't yet have top-notch writing, Romano manages to communicate something distinctive: He plays a beleaguered family man, but one who's happy about it. Not a dope and not a weasel, he's a fellow accepting his responsibilities. Ain't that unusual?
  14. That '70s Show is best when the volatility that truly characterized this period — the sense that the times they were a-changin', to a funky beat — seeps into its golden aura of fun.
  15. Both extremely funny and intelligent.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Funny fabulousness ... [with] a few too many talk-to-the-camera moments.
  16. Family Matters offers a picture of black family life that takes its middle-class ordinariness for granted, which is unusual for TV. Even more unusual, it's a show you can watch with your whole family, and chances are, everyone will get a few good laughs out of it.
  17. The debut episode isn't quite the laugh machine you'd expect from a guaranteed winner wedged between Seinfeld and ER. Clearly, what Veronica's Closet has going for it above all else is Alley's bleep-'em-all blitheness, her gift for turning a tantrum into operatic hilarity.
  18. Home Improvement isn't the best family sitcom — Roseanne still goes further and deeper — but Improvement may be the most comforting.
  19. Sometimes Dr. Katz is a little too early-period Woody Allen — more whines than jokes. But so far, Dr. Katz has proved capable of a brisk originality.
  20. Although Millennium hasn't quite found its tone, it's got great visuals and a commanding performance by Henriksen.
  21. Here's an interesting, uneven, impudent comedy-drama that may well prove to be summer television's most likably eccentric series.
  22. [Vincent] D'Onofrio is so eccentrically entertaining, even his costar Kathryn Erbe seems fascinated. ... Add tight plotting, and CI is the L&O of the year.
  23. Extremely well acted, 'Six' is a show I'll keep watching; I'm just not convinced it'll be sucking up the same pop-culture air that 'The Sopranos' did.
  24. You will feel guilty for laughing so hard, which is, I suspect, precisely the reaction David wants.
  25. It's a testament to Curb's cleverness that what's now rote--Larry offends, we cringe--can still be so surprising.
  26. I defy the naysayers who claim Curb is in a rut: Who cares if it's not reinventing itself? It has become one of the most reliably amusing comedies on TV, taking little annoyances, indignities, and offenses, and worrying at them until they bubble into fantastically overblown debacles.
  27. Although its style is novel, 24 hews to traditional crime-story conventions; you could plop this plot into a two-hour TV movie and be done with it. The advantage of the real-time hour becomes apparent, however, in the depth of characterization achieved by stretching things out.
  28. Really, my only significant complaint about the new '24' is an excessive use of its visual trademark: split-screen images. These are fine when they're used to let you know where major characters are in different subplots simultaneously, but in next week's episode, there's a split-screen shot that separates two characters talking in the same room together!
  29. With Bauer's audience-alienating daughter, Kim (Elisha Cuthbert), sent packing, the snazzy new cast members should keep the series moving at a nice clip.

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