Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,020 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Oslo, August 31st
Lowest review score: 0 Accidental Love
Score distribution:
6020 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Bruce Beresford's tightly focused adaptation retains all the impact of its Pulitzer Prize-winning stage original. Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman give exceptional performances as the aging widow and the sage black chauffeur who enlightens her in the segregated South.
  1. These 173 minutes don't drag, they waltz.
  2. Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
  3. Rapt, heady, and startling: the most profound documentary I've seen this decade.
  4. Definition eludes the delicate pleasures of this marvelous, idiosyncratic movie collage.
  5. Until Once, I'm not sure that I'd ever seen a small-scale, nonstylized, kitchen-sink drama in which the songs take on the majesty and devotion of a musical dream.
  6. Yagira's performance is so extraordinary, it won him the best actor prize at the 2004 Cannes film festival.
  7. The picture moves with stealth, enjoying its own thriller-ness as hints are laid and mislaid. There's a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
  8. Room is more than the title of one of the year’s most powerful movies — it’s a state of mind that’s unbearably tense and as claustrophobic as a straitjacket
  9. The setting is somewhere between a post-WWII Brigadoon and the environs of Marcel Carn classic "Children of Paradise," but the story is as timely as this morning's news from Europe.
  10. The first animated feature produced entirely on computer is a magically witty and humane entertainment, a hellzapoppin fairy tale about a roomful of suburban toys who come to life when humans aren't around.
  11. What's astonishing about Sofia Coppola's enthralling new movie is the precision, maturity, and originality with which the confident young writer-director communicates so clearly in a cinematic language all her own.
  12. Cary Fukunaga’s stark, beautifully shot drama was likely never meant to be a blockbuster; its brutal account of a child soldier in an unnamed African country is far too discomfiting for wider audiences. It absolutely does belong on a big screen, though, and more important, it just deserves to be seen.
  13. The film takes off from formula elements-it's yet another variation on "Die Hard"-but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that every gaudy thrill had been earned.
  14. A delicate yet haunting movie, a meditation on friendship, on the roots of bohemianism, on the sad comedy of madness.
  15. Jennifer Baichwal's gorgeous documentary Manufactured Landscapes amplifies the powerful work of Edward Burtynsky, a Canadian artist who specializes in large-scale photographs of terrain transformed by civilization into rivers and tides of industrial ugliness.
  16. Trier's compassion for what it takes to survive, mixed with the love he bestows on Oslo, is rewardingly profound.
  17. It's a work of art that deserves a space cleared for its angry, nervous beauty.
  18. Arenas' life zigzags before us in a manner as heady and unpredictable as it must have felt to the man who lived it.
  19. I suppose you could call The Big Short a comedy. It’s very, very funny. But it’s also a tragedy. Behind every easy drive-by laugh is a sincere holler of outrage.
  20. In The Beaches of Agnès, you get addicted to watching Agnès Varda watch the world.
  21. A marvelous rock doc that manages to be wistful, tasty, and jam-kicking at the same time.
  22. It's a lovely, original, Australian take on a climactic moment usually thought of as all American.
  23. A memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director Karen Moncrieff's superb feature debut.
  24. Presents Glass as a masterfully corrupt fabulist who convinced himself of the ultimate seductive lie, which is that there can't be anything wrong with telling people what they want to hear.
  25. A confidently original, engrossing interpretation.
  26. An existential chain reaction, yet as remarkable as his cinematic gamesmanship is the way that he traces the anatomy of feeling in Lola.
  27. Can be interpreted politically or even biblically or not at all, as the elemental struggles between dominance and submission, impulse and action, man and nature, father and son, play out to their stunning conclusion.
  28. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  29. The most resonant and haunting movie I've seen this year.

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