Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,321 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck
Lowest review score: 0 Even Cowgirls Get the Blues
Score distribution:
5,321 movie reviews
  1. For all I know, Ryan's performance could be a dead-on Kallen impression. But what she appears to be doing is an impression of Johnny Depp doing an impression of Keith Richards doing an impression of Liz Taylor.
  2. The movie is a true folly, yet there's no denying that Gilliam has gotten some of the hallucinogenic madness of Thompson's novel on screen.
  3. Soul-sucking romantic comedy.
  4. The film values quips and declamations over natural conversation (or an explanation of how such intelligent women could have been so blind to world events).
  5. British director Mike Barker and magpie New York screenwriter Howard Himelstein, have taken "Lady Windermere's Fan" - Wilde's first big stage success, written in 1892 - and pulped it senseless in the name of puttin' on the charm.
  6. The second insurmountable problem is the difference between Parker's performance as a fortysomething banker, wife, and mother musing (in voice-over) at her computer and her previous performance as a single, thirtysomething girl-about-town in "Sex and the City": There is none. I don't know why she does it.
  7. The movie wants to be deadly cool, but mostly it's just deadly.
  8. If you've always longed to see a Cold War satire done in the hit 'em over the head frantic camp mode of ''Love, American Style,'' then Company Man is the movie for you.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Sitting on your couch watching these morons sit on their couch and get wasted is like being the only straight guest at a pot party. Everyone else is laughing, and you're left wondering why.
  9. I love a good mind-bender, but it's getting more common these days to see thrillers that don't so much bend your mind as chop it, smash it, and place it in the Cuisinart. Trance, the new film directed by Danny Boyle is a high-brainiac art-world thriller that wants to do nothing more (or less) than give your head a majorly pleasurable spin.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 33 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Carpool is affably stupid Saturday-matinee fare -- good for opiating the kids for a few hours -- but let's just say it's no Big Bully.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Exhibits none of the infectious offhand tastelessness of their hit show and all of the insistent overkill of a Mel Brooks joke gone horribly wrong.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The experiment didn't work. The English-language production is a jumble of poorly delineated notions about love, celebrity, the look of romantic movies, and the sound of American-style dialogue - and it's been sitting on the shelf for over a year.
  10. It's hard to say what's more excruciating: Alex's novel, which is like ''The Great Gatsby'' rewritten by Lizzie McGuire, or his quarrelsome flirtation with Emma, who has no existence as a character apart from her drive to reshape Alex into a specimen of respectable tamed manhood.
  11. The premise is out of '70s porn, and so is the overbroad satire and almost total lack of conviction.
  12. A yawn-by-numbers romper-room dud.
  13. The Smurfs may be blue, but their movie is decidedly green, recycling discarded bits from other celluloid Happy Meals like "Alvin and the Chipmunks," "Garfield," and "Hop" into something half animated, half live action, and all careful studio calculation.
  14. This is strictly substandard stuff, with imitative creepy noises, vertiginous camera angles, and long pauses.
  15. Few comedies have worked this hard to make everyone on screen look this dumb.
  16. Nobody's got a clue. Enquiring minds don't even want to know.
  17. If you're looking for cheap scares and have 90 minutes to kill, you could do worse than The Pyramid. But not a lot worse.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    In Blended, his (Sandler) comic flab has never felt as thick, and this hackneyed "family-friendly" entertainment feels less like a movie than a bad sit-com re-run.
  18. This Debbie Downer of a drama is a bitter slog.
  19. It just makes you want to flip on the tube to see the real (fake) thing.
  20. Commits the cardinal sin of too many modern movies: It never gives the audience a clue why any of these people were ever attracted to one another in the first place. [30 May 1997, p. 54]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. A mess -- all high concept, stranded performances, and no laughs.
  22. Washington is wasted here. Kelly Lynch is wooden. Crowe has a ball going over the top, but how much taunting and eyeball popping can a performer do?
    • 24 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    At least London nails the inanity of drug-speak - the bathroom chat quickly devolves from God and ''time horizons'' to coprophilia and a truly dumb confessional tirade by Statham - although perhaps this achievement is unintentional.
  23. You can see what the film was going for, but the jokes just sit there; you chuckle a few times, mostly out of lame hope, but you never bust a gut, never really get what you came for.
  24. Yes indeed, Pirates 2.0 is a theme ride, if by ride you mean a hellish contraption into which a ticket holder is strapped, overstimulated but unsatisfied, and unable to disengage until the operator releases the restraining harness.
  25. But when the writers run out of ideas, they simply have Farley walk into a lamppost, or cop from old SNL skits.
  26. Subplots go nowhere, and characters -- many played by well-known actors -- barely get screen time. Willem Dafoe, Salma Hayek, and Jane Krakowski are among those who are there and gone.
  27. This toothless thriller...feels like a strained reworking of ''The Fugitive.''
  28. There isn't a shred of subtlety in their clowning - or in any part of the movie, which clumsily shoots for operatic highs and lows. But with so many borrowed bits and pieces, the only feeling it successfully evokes is déjà vu.
  29. When martial arts star Michelle Yeoh shows up as a pious, butt-kicking nun, you have to wonder if Kassovitz isn't accidentally cribbing from Mel Brooks, too.
  30. Old Holden would call the whole movie phony, and I agree, if you want to know the truth.
  31. Bland to dismal.
  32. Features the dullest, least lifelike collection of pals this side of "Eyes Wide Shut."
    • Entertainment Weekly
  33. A brutally monotonous thriller.
  34. Not one female character escapes mockery or patronizing.
  35. A jaw-dropping misfire. The dialogue is laughably pretentious, the plotting is virtually nonexistent, and the performances are so broad and cartoony that you keep wondering if it's all some sort of prank.
  36. Cooper, who looks appealingly wolfish in his expensively tailored suits, plays the whole thing with a dutiful, earnest expression lacquered on his face, his eyes misting on cue at the exact same moments yours will be rolling into the back of your head.
  37. Ultimately, Age of Extinction is an endless barrage of nonsense and noise.
  38. It's like the worst movie Jean-Claude Van Damme never made.
  39. Some horror movies want to scare you witless, but Silent Hill: Revelation 3D just wants to beat you senseless.
  40. Asia Argento is not what I would call a good actress, but she's a prime specimen of train-wreck sexuality: a debauched Eurotrash starlet who oozes punk cred more than she does talent. It's not too hard to see why she wanted to write, direct, and star in The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    As campy as a flick by Banderas' evident artistic mentor, Pedro Almódovar.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Bogusly wholesome six-gun dud.
  41. A demented, orgiastically gory vampire/sex parable.
  42. No worse than any disease-of-the-week TV movie, and no more moralistic than any Lifetime drama. But it's no better, either, and it ought to be.
  43. This sequel adds more insults and injuries that could traumatize little ones. Most frightening of all, the ending leaves the door open for ''103 Dalmatians,'' which would certainly constitute Cruella and unusual punishment.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  44. It was originally called ''Animal Husbandry,'' and while the producers were throwing away that title, they might have done well to chuck the movie along with it.
  45. Really, all this movie is about is the joy of checks, calls, folds, rivers, and the acquired thrill of knowing what those words mean.
  46. Robin Williams (yes, I'm afraid so) plays a kind of Manhattan-based Fagin with a touch of Midnight Cowboy to his wardrobe. And ants will play havoc in any cynic's pants as this loopy, goopy fairy tale about a kid looking for his parents oozes to its predictable finish.
  47. Most of the movie's action-horror set pieces play like lame Gwar music video outtakes, and Cage's signature mix of irony and off-the-rails mugging only works when you can see the actor's face. In Ghost Rider form, his character is just a skeletal automaton with neither a tongue nor a cheek to put it in.
  48. Van Helsing, a fusion of eye candy and brain sputter, is a long, kinetic, yet dreary mess.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    What you have is less a sequel to a not-so-bad remake than yet another remake, this one of that not-so-great 1988 John Candy comedy "The Great Outdoors."
  49. The Farrelly brothers could burp out a movie funnier than The Hottie & the Nottie, a farce of corrupt stereotypes that's never more grotesque than when it pretends to be more than skin-deep.
  50. The results in Employee of the Month are toothless.
  51. FYI, there's zero chemistry between P.S. I Love You's two commodified headliners. P.S.: The plus in the harsh grade goes solely to the divine Lisa Kudrow, delivering desperately needed laughs as the twitchy widow's husband-hunting best friend.
  52. Apollo 18 fails to stay with you because, like the cratered satellite on which it's set, it has no atmosphere.
  53. The Avengers is too enervated to qualify as even a full-scale disaster.
  54. Back to the Future Part III has that same sort of studio back-lot clunkiness. Only this time it's the audience that gets conked — by the sheer desperation of the whole enterprise.
  55. In one form or another, you get exactly what you pay for at an Adam Sandler comedy. Otherwise the man wouldn't have earned zillions.
  56. Most of The Man is as awful as last year's debacle, "Taxi," yet Levy, stuck in a no-brainer variation on Billy Crystal's predicament in "Analyze This," shows just enough noodgy passive-aggression to suggest what the movie might have been were it not shackled to buddy-action clichés.
  57. Nightwatch is a horror for reasons that have nothing to do with suspenseful moviemaking.
  58. If your allergy to comedies bred from British style mugging crossed with Disney style prancing has, like mine, flared up in recent years, this hybrid from writer director Joel Hershman (''Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me'') will make you wheeze.
  59. Its greatest achievement is that there isn't a single convincing scene in it.
  60. Generic hip-hop soundtrack? Check. Aerial stock footage of milieu? Check. Hardy-har homophobia and misogyny? Check. Emasculated sub-Gump white dude played by Jay Mohr? Double check.
  61. The Medallion makes you long for Tucker -- and for Jackie Chan to fly without digital wings.
  62. I Love You to Death is strenuously unclever.
  63. No belief on earth can rescue Swank from a film that's a chain of disaster chintz masquerading as a sermon.
  64. Have there ever been two less energetic stars than Eric Stoltz and Annabella Sciorra? Casting this diffident duo in an allegedly romantic comedy proves disastrous; they suck the air out of virtually every scene.
  65. An unctuous rom-com that runs its characters through every plastic cliché of a pre-Oscar McConaughey vehicle, ultimately causing us to root against the vacuous couple and their predetermined happy ending.
  66. You should be rooting for the humans, but you might as well be rooting for the blobs. Most likely, though, you'll just be rooting for the credits.
  67. Too mild to be dirty, yet too dirty to be charming, and altogether too generic to be much of anything.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Long on smarm and short on charm.
  68. For all of De Palma's studious multimedia trickery -- a valid, even inspired idea -- Redacted is so naive it's an embarrassment.
  69. Adam Sandler stars in a one-joke Caddyshack for the blitzed and jaded.
  70. For his part, Lee seems to have pored over every sports underdog movie of the last twenty years, boiled away all the interesting particulars, and kept whatever dross was left.
  71. Lawrence is so ON that he appears to be gunning for clockwork bursts of audience approval.
  72. Orphan isn't scary -- it's garish and plodding.
  73. A recitation of woes doesn't constitute a plot, and panoramic shots of migrating wildlife don't convey enough African flavor.
  74. CJ7
    Trivial and charmless.
  75. The fusion of cheekiness and deliberately overscaled fantasy never jells.
  76. This rusty jalopy of a movie, which is so ramshackle it's nearly enough to make you forget how tossed-together the 1976 ''Car Wash'' was.
  77. This one is just murk.
  78. An Unfinished Life is inert, kaput -- a middlebrow mush of platitudes rather than an okay corral of distinct characters with heartbeats. It's awful not in an exciting, uncontrolled way but in an overly controlled, narcotized way.
  79. Everything about Vice feels like recycled goods. It's basically "Westworld" meets "Blade Runner" programmed by glitchy filmmaking replicators.
  80. A film not even a star as foxed and foxy as Johnny Depp himself could save.
  81. Antonio Banderas is a charming and talented man, but in Take the Lead he lays on the old-world panache so thick - the accent, the flowery courtliness, the romance of romance - that he comes off like Dracula's metrosexual cousin.
  82. Lawrence's gender-bending jokes are played out, and his slapstick is wooden and slow.
  83. There's no enjoyably outlandish hiss to this variation on the formula, and no Ice Cube or Owen Wilson, either. This time, a ship of capitalist fools (and no movie stars, unless you count utility player Morris Chestnut as a headliner) steams along the river in Borneo.
  84. "Species" at least had the benefit of Henstridge's glazed porn-doll perversity, but this time any glimmers of sexual ominousness are buried in a lame, desultory chase plot and in the woefully underimagined special effects.
  85. Every porridgy inmate in this instantly forgettable romp warbles in the prison's amateur musical, and one of them demonstrates a rather extreme devotion to the tomatoes he grows in the on-site greenhouse.
  86. Holland's empurpled bio-fantasy is hooey with an anachronistic feminist slant from start to finish.
  87. Since there is a mystery, the movie might have been entertaining camp had director Taylor Hackford staged it with pace, style, or a whisper of surprise. Instead, the plot just clunks forward-for two hours and 10 minutes.
  88. Tame and witless enough to make me long for the ancient, dusty fright kitsch of ''The Munsters.''
  89. The star is done in by the deathless mediocrity of the production, an assemblage of random camera shots, messy editing, redundant scenes, and witless dialogue as haphazardly stitched together as the flesh on Jonah Hex's face.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Director Walter Hill won't take credit for Supernova... Can you blame him?

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