Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,962 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
5962 movie reviews
  1. Holland's empurpled bio-fantasy is hooey with an anachronistic feminist slant from start to finish.
  2. Since there is a mystery, the movie might have been entertaining camp had director Taylor Hackford staged it with pace, style, or a whisper of surprise. Instead, the plot just clunks forward-for two hours and 10 minutes.
  3. This mediocrity disguised as entertainment, this greed promoted as synergy — this, to paraphrase that seminal media study, Broadcast News, is what the devil looks like.
  4. Tame and witless enough to make me long for the ancient, dusty fright kitsch of ''The Munsters.''
  5. The star is done in by the deathless mediocrity of the production, an assemblage of random camera shots, messy editing, redundant scenes, and witless dialogue as haphazardly stitched together as the flesh on Jonah Hex's face.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Director Walter Hill won't take credit for Supernova... Can you blame him?
  6. Sadly, rather than melding the best of two worlds, the film only takes the worst of their soap operas.
  7. The movie doesn't so much extend Schwartzman's antic outsider persona from ''Rushmore'' as uglify it, reducing him to the ultimate Uncool Anti-WASP.
  8. Director Ken Kwapis fills the movie with feeble references to Planet of the Apes and King Kong that don’t amuse adults and sail over the heads of tykes who snicker most at the raspberries Dunston blows at anyone he meets.
  9. The movie is MTV Kafka: Instead of dialogue, character, behavior, it has a look and a mood. And that's all it has.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    If you put the scripts for ''West Side Story,'' ''Mean Streets,'' and ''The Warriors'' in a blender, you might wind up with something like Deuces Wild, a preposterously melodramatic paean to gang-member teens in Brooklyn circa 1958.
  10. The scenery (prettily captured by There Will Be Blood cinematographer Robert Elswit) is littered with heavy symbolism (fire! rain! dead birds!); the performances are merely heavy.
  11. In its hostile sitcom way, Christmas With the Kranks is a paranoid comic nightmare of conformity gone mad.
  12. At least Ribisi's fake-cojones histrionics are fun. The rest of this "Donnie Brasco" knockoff, with James Marsden as a Gulf War veteran who goes undercover, is a turgid, ketchup-spattered dud.
  13. Silly, undone by lack of faith in its own subject.
  14. Ultimately, the talented cast -- among them M. Emmet Walsh, Faye Dunaway, Skeet Ulrich, and Viggo Mortensen -- play to their easiest star turns rather than their most interesting strengths.
  15. This rote exorcism-is-real claptrap.
  16. Running is a fevered smashup, as if Hollywood dug up Sam Peckinpah's corpse and forced it to adapt "Grand Theft Auto: Vice City" for the screen.
  17. If you want to know how inept the movie is...well, it's so inept that you may wish you were watching an M. Night Shyamalan version of the very same premise.
  18. The endless, numbing sameness of it all.
  19. Stuart Townsend, Theron's reallife boyfriend, may have inner fires as an actor that have yet to be revealed, but in Head in the Clouds he's a somber puppy who looks as if Theron could eat him alive. I wish she had.
  20. This cinematic stiff should have stayed buried.
  21. Director Dito Montiel splinter’s the film’s story on multiple tracks, in a truly shameless and incredibly obvious effort to protect a Big Twist.
  22. Sounds mildly fun, be forwarned: When in Rome doesn't even offer that.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    A tired action thriller determined to play the race card every which way for every which kind of viewer, seems hopelessly behind the curve.
  23. Tells a moldy-oldie, not-nearly-as-nasty-as-it-thinks-it-is joke. Over and over again.
  24. Self-righteous and smug in its use of heartland stereotypes, the movie backfires by assuming that its intended liberal audience is just as intolerant and condescending as the conservative opposition insists it is.
  25. A few of the images are startling, but as Radha Mitchell (a good actress) wanders through a ghost town, searching for her lost daughter as though she was touring an abandoned movie set, Silent Hill is mostly paralyzing in its vagueness.
  26. Has all the mood enhancing flavor of a tropical cocktail made with watered down rum and fake fruit juice.
  27. Even if Robin Williams were still among us, the limp, drearily derivative A Merry Friggin' Christmas would feel like it had a pall cast over it.
  28. This slapdash, charmless, baldly boomer-chasing romantic comedy, directed by Michael Lehmann (Heathers) from a clunky, orgasm-obsessed script by Karen Leigh Hopkins and Jessie Nelson, is the lazy studio's answer to a call for more age-appropriate entertainment for "More" magazine readers.
  29. The movie has no script, and even the better gags - like one in which a couple of the pilots scribble away at coloring books in the backseat of a plane - could have been staged more vividly.
  30. If Crowe's eyes are open, he seems to have directed most of Vanilla Sky with his mind wide shut.
  31. Perelman pays such cooing attention to surfaces that our response to violence carries no more importance than our response to the delicate jewelry around the adult Diana's neck.
  32. Even the film's one "original" twist is just a desperate attempt to link it up to Ghost Rider, the only lousy Nicolas Cage action film that is actually spawning a sequel.
  33. The film is proof that if you repackage the classics (in this case, Dickens) for the youth market in an era of MTV dislocation, what you get, in essence, is postmodern Cliffs Notes with an alt-rock soundtrack.
  34. Really, the sole favor Dolman does the plucky Hawn is to light her rear end so that its continued gloriousness can be appreciated.
  35. The only pleasure to be derived from the resulting carnage comes from the Rube Goldbergesque chain reactions that precede each fatality.
  36. Even in her dullest vehicle, Lindsay Lohan exudes an unfakable shine.
  37. Terminally muddled crime drama.
  38. The director, Nora Ephron, displays her peerless gift for making everything seem snappy and mushy at the same time, and Travolta's performance has a slovenly, I-can-do-anything-and-you'll-still-love-me obnoxiousness.
  39. It takes the movie all of 15 minutes to descend into sub-Spielbergian banalities about poor Max's search for his absentee dad.
  40. The dialogue, most of which is stilted philosophy about femininity and beauty, sounds like something your freshman-year roommate said and you learned to ignore.
  41. Insistently sullen, nihilistic, and successful to the point of smugness at transmitting buzzkill, Art School Confidential is the second collaboration between art-house cartoonist Daniel Clowes and director Terry Zwigoff.
  42. McCarthy's rawhide has become movie Naugahyde, a substance unknown in literature or in nature.
  43. The main problem? Raid lacks a center. It's an exhausted sprawl with multiple story foci, none of them terribly compelling.
  44. Yet Speed 2 is as slow-moving as a garbage scow. Those blinking lights might as well be emanating from a vital-signs monitor. The story is dead in the water.
  45. Though not quite the fiasco of revved-up gunplay that Beverly Hills Cop II was, this new movie, directed by John ''Rock-'em Sock-'em'' Landis, is just a clunky action thriller, with occasional comic moments rationed out to the audience like stray crumbs.
  46. Dirty Grandpa feels like spending 100-plus minutes with a scatalogical toddler, proudly showing you what he made in his diaper. Don’t look if you don’t have to.
  47. A portentous and goopy Dutch drama.
  48. With his tousled mane and wispy facial hair, Asian pop star/ Prada model Kaneshiro suggests a Japanese Johnny Depp, but even his charisma can't carry Returner through its interminable longueurs. Blame it on Yamazaki.
  49. Neither Sandler nor his listless writers (too many punchlines just sit there and collect flies) seem invested. Whether he’s saving the planet or putting the moves on Michelle Monaghan, Sandler can’t be bothered to raise his pulse above comatose. If he doesn’t care, why should anyone else?
  50. The gooey sanctity of the bond between fathers and sons all but nullify Jackson's zesty performance.
  51. The few jaunty, ''Friends''-inflected lines Perry does get off are lost among the cow pies.
  52. Just as all regular models can't be supermodels, so all action chicks can't be superheroines. Elektra Natchios turns out to be walled off rather than mysteriously alluring; blank rather than deep.
  53. Most of this just seems, you know, so three years ago, so "Bourne" again.
  54. Viewers primed for a postapocalyptic blowout will be disappointed to learn that Universal Soldier is set in the boring old present day, and that until the climactic clash the film is slow-moving and short on firepower.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    If steampunk bloodbaths aren't for you, it's a long wait for the fat lady to sing.
  55. Jean-Claude Van Damme's latest dud.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Gets lost in translation.
  56. The best part of Piranha 3DD, the pointless sequel to the utterly unnecessary 2010 remake of Piranha, is the credits. Not only do they signify that the film is finally, mercifully over, but they also allow for David Hasselhoff to sing the theme song to a new fake TV series called The Fish Hunter, a clever meta-gag that nods both to Baywatch and the Hoff's international recording success.
  57. He now imparts so many life lessons via his Rube Goldberg thresher devices that he's starting to turn into the Rod Serling of severed body parts. Now that's torture.
  58. I gave up making heads or tails of Synecdoche, New York, but I did get one message: The compulsion to stand outside of one's life and observe it to THIS degree isn't the mechanism of art -- it's the structure of psychosis.
  59. Some movies make love look schematic. The Trouble With Men + Women makes those films look stunningly insightful.
  60. Empty jokes hang heavy.
  61. Without any of the patented Farrelly insight into the insecure, horndoggy teen in every man, and without a grown-up setting in which Harry and Lloyd can transgress like dum-dum geniuses,Dumb and Dumberer is dumberest.
  62. Red Riding Hood goes from trite to triter, a plot collapse that overtakes any of the visual prettiness from cinematographer Mandy Walker (Beastly).
  63. I don't know if it's ickier to assume that writer-director Brad Silberling (Moonlight Mile) thinks the culture-clash jokes he pushes in 10 Items or Less are charming because they're earnest, or because they're tongue-in-cheek. Either way, this sale is void.
  64. Myers is trying for another of his endearingly hormonal imp-egomaniacs, but hidden behind a wavy beard, a wax-curled mustache, and an astoundingly ugly squashed fake nose, he's a little too grotesque.
  65. The characters who cross paths here in the hard shadows of late-'90s New York City are meant to convey loneliness, bitterness, neediness, loss, and bad karma. Mostly, they convey bad Sundance.
  66. ''Kid'' seeks to ''empower'' its target audience of recent Pokémon grads with an adult antihero desperation that feels preemptive and inappropriate.
  67. As a shameless contraption of ridiculously sad things befalling attractive people, the engorged romantic tragedy Remember Me stands tall between those towering monuments to teen-oriented cinematic misery, Love Story and Twilight.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    This movie has no courage and little brains, and is salvaged, if at all, only by its heart. There remains a huge market for a great Halloween teen comedy, but Fun Size is the disappointing apple that your crazy-haired neighbor gives you instead of candy.
  68. Garish, squeal-pitched preteen comedy.
  69. How lame have high-concept, no-brain comedies gotten?
  70. Bloodless and false.
  71. A notorious opinion divider last year at Cannes, Battle in Heaven is less about heaven or battle, or hell on earth, or the soul of Mexico, and all too much about gawking. And so, for all the ''shock'' of the movie's clinical carnality, this battle is lost.
  72. What's on screen is lazy, second-rate, phoned-in -- a heist in which it's the audience whose pockets have been picked.
  73. So let's hear it for the giant wig of Pre-Raphaelite gray corkscrews planted on the noggin of Jane Fonda as a glamorous hippie grandma. The hairdo meets its match in the dull Ann Taylor togs encasing Catherine Keener: That's how you know Granny's daughter is an uptight lawyer.
  74. Burns pads around Gotham, yammering yesterday's op-eds about Disneyfication and ''classic New York holdouts.'' He somehow manages to sound fogyish AND immature.
  75. Earns points only for being remarkably unself-conscious about its across-the-board ineptitude.
  76. Even ignoring the racism — which is pretty much impossible — No Escape is a cliché-ridden, artless relic.
  77. Faster grafts that genre's style onto a deadbeat script and leaves it to Johnson - as deadly focused as a gunsight - to make it all believable.
  78. A creepy, humiliating ''comedy,'' playing to Bullock's worst instincts for demonstrating the lovability of women who don’t fit in.
  79. You don't walk into a movie like A Haunted House 2 expecting anything remotely scary or serious, but you don't expect to walk out feeling a terrible sense of dread, either.
  80. It's an utterly fake nostalgia piece -- stupid and pandering, a bad-boy teen flick that plays less like a loving look at the late '70s than a terrible movie from the late '70s.
  81. The only performer I enjoyed watching was Martin Short, who plays a bitch dandy music teacher with a smile so fake that the comedian seems to be acting with his gums.
  82. If you've been longing to see the worst family entertainment of 1966, A Dog of Flanders may be the movie for you.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    It's tempting to brand the film anti-Semitic, but it's so utterly pointless it lacks even that distinction.
  83. Hop
    It's "Alvin and the Chipmunks" with only one chipmunk, and (if possible) even less fun.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The plot twists fall about as weightily as the fake snow.
  84. The film squanders every opportunity (and international-coproduction cent) on by now imitative Nine Inch Nails-video-style visual Goth-goo, and, scarily, forgets to input a plot or script that makes any sense.
  85. What willful streak of perversity inspired Kevin Costner to take on this wacky tale of a letter carrier-turned-postapocalyptic hero?
  86. Whenever an actress takes on a gritty working-class role, the audience does a gut check of authenticity. Either the actress gets it, like Melissa Leo did in "Frozen River," or she doesn't, like Michelle Monaghan as the spoilin'-for-a-fight truck-driver heroine of the inert indie dud Trucker
  87. An immediately forgettable action pic directed with a blowtorch by Lee Tamahori.
  88. The audience gets the message (religious fanaticism: bad), but nothing we see is convincing on its own.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Movie is dopey. And with its emphasis on stupid violence, xylophone abs, and getting yourself on YouTube, it's yet another product that makes you feel bad about today's youth culture.
  89. The movie lacks even the misplaced fervor of obsession. It's lifeless kitsch.
  90. A sodden ''feminist'' vulgarization.
  91. It will have you groaning between yawns.

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