Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,045 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Crazy, Stupid, Love
Lowest review score: 0 Bigger Than the Sky
Score distribution:
6045 movie reviews
  1. That the story is so oldfashioned and domestic and the family so average and secular is, in its way, the wind beneath this Broken Wings.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Bounding out of the gate like a greyhound, Unleashed needs only its first 30 seconds or so to elevate itself well above the average action potboiler.
  2. An attack-of-the-aliens disaster film crafted with sinister technological grandeur -- a true popcorn apocalypse.
  3. The movie is smart, serious, and adult about something that matters, but not at the expense of a kind of awful, sensual revelry as le Carré's capacious plot hurtles to its big finish.
  4. Superb psychological thriller.
  5. Another 3-D animated kid movie demonstrates that cartoon storytelling pitched to young people is the last, best refuge of sprightly filmmaking this hard, hot summer.
  6. Light and goofy, yet the fight scenes, which are the heart of the film, are lickety-split mad fun.
  7. In Shoot Me, she wears her spiked cynicism like a cutting form of grace, and everyone around her (including audiences) gets healed by it.
  8. The powerful thrust of the film comes from its critique of the media.
  9. Like all courtroom dramas, A Few Good Men is gimmicky and synthetic. It's also an irresistible throwback to the sort of sharp-edged entertainment Hollywood once provided with regularity.
  10. The unlikeliest enthralling movie to be released so far this year.
  11. The crowd-pleasing comic Euro-drama The Concert is, at its musical center, as full of ripe emotion as Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D Major. It's also as darkly funny as a Slavic farce, a composition of sweet cacophony.
  12. A sobering look at the bureaucratic trials and life-and-death decisions rookie doctors face on their daily rounds.
  13. What's most amazing in The Amazing Spider-Man turns out to be not the shared sensations of blockbuster wow! the picture elicits, but rather the shared satisfactions of intimate awww.
  14. El Bulli becomes a haunting celebration of the human desire to turn food into art - even if the results are consciously insane.
  15. The movie is on some level a stunt, but it has the fervent, sun-dazed pull of an authentic experience unfolding in real time, with glints of drama, comedy, and terror mixed into the almost-but-not-quite tedium.
  16. A warm embrace of tradition and boisterous, ethnographically rich local culture.
  17. With exemplary use of archival footage, director Asif Kapadia expertly contrasts episodes of adrenaline-rush speed with moments of reflective slow motion to capture the addictive thrill and danger of the sport, as well as the personal values of the humble, spiritual sportsman.
  18. It's the rare portrait of a happy marriage that is honest about the complex currents of desire, and the drama is beautifully played by Bale, who gawks with soulful sweetness, and Watson, who does her most piercing work since "Breaking the Waves."
  19. The London universe Leigh creates (employing his trademark improv techniques to unite his ensemble, many of whom make their film debuts) isn't so much a reality as a hope, and an invitation to find joy and grace in everyday moments.
  20. Part of being in a punk band involves having to play some pretty hostile venues. But the one in writer-director Jeremy Saulnier’s new white-knuckle thriller, Green Room, makes the typical mosh-pit dive look like a kindergarten run by nuns.
  21. David Farrier and Dylan Reeve’s documentary Tickled is so crazy that it feels like a hoax. Only it’s not. At least, I don’t think it is.
  22. As compelling as it is bizarre.
  23. Utterly riveting fictional drama.
  24. Nothing in this enjoyably twisty, cool/ hot, genre-grafting Italian psychological thriller by Giuseppe Capotondi is what it seems. And the more you try to solve the narrative puzzle, the more you may want to watch it again - or at least argue about what's real.
  25. Don’t miss this astonishingly bleak, inventive, funny, sumptuously designed film.
  26. A marvelous contraption, a wheels-within-wheels thriller that's pure oxygenated movie play.
  27. But the notable accomplishment of actress-writer Kasi Lemmons ("The Silence of the Lambs") in her feature directorial debut is in creating a landscape quite beautiful and entirely her own -- a fluid, feminine, African-American, Southern gothic narrative that covers a tremendous amount of emotional territory with the lightest and most graceful of steps.
  28. Riveting family portrait.
  29. Just about the only documentary that works like a novel, inviting you to read between the lines of Baker's personality until you touch the secret sadness at the heart of his beauty.
  30. A disturbingly avid re-creation of the last six weeks in the life and slow, self-imposed wasting of Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands.
  31. Dishes up some very corny jokes, but the images have a brighter-than-life vivacity.
  32. Dench and Coogan's chemistry is undeniably great. In the end, he manages to give her the answers she seeks and she manages to give him a heart.
  33. The most original and excitingly executed wow-factor-meets-handheld-video feature since "Blair Witch" itself. It's also a movie that rebuilds the power of special effects from the ground up.
  34. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 also bravely faces the future, slipping with expert ease among the thrilling mass of complications (and complicated set pieces) that Rowling throws fans in the final sprint, then guiding the faithful to the fate that awaits everyone in this world, the moment called The End.
  35. A realistic drama that looks and feels as inevitably true and moving as a good documentary.
  36. A deft, funny, shrewdly unsettling tribute to such slasher-exploitation thrillers as "Terror Train," "New Year's Evil," and Craven's own "A Nightmare on Elm Street."
  37. The triumph of ''Spring, Summer'' is that even those of us who don't happen to be Buddhists can catch a glimpse of ourselves in the spinning wheel of hope, destruction, suffering, and bliss.
  38. With this heartbreaking yet hopeful new documentary about his life’s work, Salgado shares the stories behind these split-second black-and-white moments, giving them even more dimension.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The combination of Home’s layered message, fun score, and clever comedy make it a colorful choice for moviegoers of any age.
  39. Here, love and attraction between two teenage girls put them on a collision course with Tehran society in general and one girl's troubled, increasingly religious brother in particular.
  40. So suspenseful, sexy, and surprising that it would be a shame to say any more.
  41. British filmmaker Andrew Haigh's background in editing (from Gladiator to Mister Lonely) is evident in the casual beauty of moments that only appear "found," giving Weekend an engrossing documentary feel.
  42. The notion of meta has never been diddled more mega than in this giddy Möbius strip of a movie, a contrivance so whizzy and clever that even when it tangles at the end, murked like swampy southwestern Florida itself, the stumble has quotation marks around it.
  43. Moreau is bewitching -- she simply breathes her role, without a hint of vanity.
  44. The movie is an unblinking look at the hidden (or perhaps not so hidden) pathology of American sports mania.
  45. Linklater has hardly been a slacker this year. I'll take the tricky confrontational babble of Tape over some of the gauzier soliloquies in ''Waking Life,'' but either way, he's a filmmaker in love with the music of talk, and let's bless him for that.
  46. Countdown to Zero makes old terrors radioactively new again.
  47. There's a bravura recklessness to Beautiful People that perfectly fits its subject.
  48. [Taylor] deftly translates the bleak, raw-boned menace and tricky time signatures of Train’s intertwined plotlines, and draws remarkably vivid performances from his cast, particularly his two female leads.
  49. It shows us how rare love is — and how we need to grab it and not let it go.
  50. A movie at once understated and radical, deceptively unremarkable in presentation and ballsy in its earnestness. Don't let the star's overly familiar squint fool you: This is subtle, perceptive stuff.
  51. It's probably the impresario's best-made movie yet, his most joyful, and his most moving.
  52. Superb, Oscar-nominated documentary.
  53. The documentary equivalent of a page-turner.
  54. The movie is a bumpy road of twists that leads to a revelation that has the shock and force of Greek tragedy.
  55. It's a beautiful contraption of a movie, a gothic backwoods fable that uses its naive yet murderous hero to walk a fine line between sentimentality and dread.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  56. A quietly dazzling microcosm that's always just this side of eerie, just that side of tragic.
  57. Which brings us back to Kidman, who really IS sensational here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Vallée has taken a contemplative book where, frankly, very little happens and transformed it into a gut-punching drama.
  58. The final shot, of the three characters now united, may be the quietest affirmation of life I've ever seen in a movie, and one of the truest.
  59. Hugo both ticks and flies by, a marvel meant to be pulled from the cabinet and enjoyed again and again.
  60. Up and Down captures Prague life with a fervor that's comical but a longing that's serious; no one is easy to pigeonhole.
  61. Watching Bounce, you look at him (Affleck) and believe how much he's got at stake, and you look at Paltrow and know why.
  62. Duck Season unfolds with a slaphappy logic that only looks casual. In fact, every unfinished conversation and banal picture on the wall (one's of ducks) matters as four little people share one memorable little day.
  63. I mean no impertinence when I say that as a portrait of love and grief, writer-director Mike White's exceptional film Year of the Dog deserves the same admiration accorded Joan Didion's exceptional memoir "The Year of Magical Thinking."
  64. Something marvelous happens as the filmmaker, in his first feature, expertly metes out small scenes of communication between people taught, for generations, to be wary of one another: This Band swings with the rhythms of hope.
  65. It's a crackerjack B movie worthy of comparison to such stylishly low-down, smart-meets-dumb, hyper-violent entertainments as the 1997 Kurt Russell thriller "Breakdown," Clint Eastwood's infamous police bloodbath "The Gauntlet," John Carpenter's original "Assault on Precinct 13," and Arnold's own overlooked 1986 outing "Raw Deal."
  66. The film is like East of Eden replayed as a hyperbolic rock fever dream. There are a few sour, juvenile moments, but this is the rare pop movie that works the way a great rock & roll song does: It tells a simple, almost elemental tale and uses the music to set it aflame.
  67. The very title The Departed suggests a James Joycean take on Irish-Catholic sentiment when, of course, this story is anything but: It's Scorsesean, and he's in full bloom.
  68. Shrewd, tough, and lively -- a junior-league "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."
  69. A mesmerizing work of disturbing power and unease.
  70. The real joy of The Gift is getting to that twisted goodness, because more than anything, Edgerton’s script and direction demonstrate a keen understanding of tension and what puts an audience on edge.
  71. Smith transfers an Iowa-based short story by Randy Russell to India's western Goa region -- and works in Hindi, primarily with novice actors. The result is a story both authentically specific and profoundly global.
  72. His (Townsend) staging has a tumult, a multi-POV immediacy that brings to mind Paul Greengrass' "Bloody Sunday."
  73. This deliciously feisty doc contextualizes their verbal brawls and the odd love-hate (mostly hate) rivalry between two men who seemed able to regard their own sense of heroism only through the other’s villainy.
  74. Lives happily ever after because it's such a feisty but good natured embrace of the inner ogre in everyone.
  75. Film music by Nino Rota provides a Fellini overlay.
  76. This truly intimate film invites viewers to commune as well and feel a profound living connection with fellow humans of 30,000 years ago.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In Martin Provost’s graceful biopic, Emmanuelle Devos plays Leduc as a powder keg of a woman who used her loneliness and insecurity as the explosive fuel for her work.
  77. In a bold move that pays off, the movie jettisons dialogue altogether and tells its whole story through barn-animal noises, goofy sound effects, and sight gags so silly they’d make Benny Hill spin in sped-up ecstasy. The effect is contagiously cute.
  78. The Cockettes weren't talented, exactly, yet the bedazzled flakiness of their passion takes you closer than just about any movie has to what was once really meant by the term ''free-spirited.''
  79. Clooney certainly brings out the best in his actors, but his driving trait as a filmmaker is that he knows what plays - he has an uncanny sense of how to uncork a scene and let it bubble and flow.
  80. Traces the sport to its Polynesian beginnings, then zooms in on the genesis of 20th- century Southern California surf culture -- the boards, the bikinis, the laid-back cowabunga.
  81. Fehling gives a commanding physical performance as he transitions from ambition to despair to, finally, resolve.
  82. There's a slightness to Postcards From the Edge, and a little too much satirical self-help jargon (the story is all about how Suzanne learns to like herself). But the movie captures — and celebrates — how easy it is to turn your problems into show biz.
  83. Like "Almost Famous," Ponsoldt’s film gets at something deep and true about the journalist/subject dynamic and the phony intimacy and tiny betrayals implicit in it. It’s a profoundly moving story about a towering talent who seemed to feel too much and judge himself too harshly to stick around for long. What a shame.
  84. That Thing You Do! is neither overly sentimental nor overly cynical. It looks at the invention of our pop-rock mythology, and the bands that fed it until they were consumed by it, just as you'd expect Tom Hanks to: with open eyes (and a raised eyebrow).
  85. Lauren Ambrose is lovely as the girlfriend he's a fool to lose but seems intent on losing anyhow.
  86. Mezzogiorno (Love in the Time of Cholera) plays Dalser with the kind of fervent intensity once seen in silent films.
  87. The jazzish score, by Lee's music man, Terence Blanchard, is typically intrusive. But the mood is right, the twists are new. And with one casting inspiration, Inside Man furthers the rising stardom of Chiwetel Ejiofor (Serenity).
  88. What hooks you from the start is Dakota Fanning's unfussy passion as Fern.
  89. Janet McTeer displays Amazonian power while Jennifer Jason Leigh tears into her role as a high maintenance creature with a ferocity that leaves little room for her usual acting tics.
  90. Pulling the bandage of sentiment cleanly away from oozing concepts like ''heroism'' and ''our nation's war on terror'' in the aftermath of recent wounds, here's a drama about the most politically charged crisis of our time that grants the dignity of autonomy to every soul involved.
  91. The War Tapes captures how the war in Iraq, for all its terrible carnage and death, is in a way too random in its destruction to even be called ''combat.''
  92. Real Steel is directed by "Night at the Museum's" Shawn Levy, who makes good use of his specialized skill in blending people and computer-made imaginary things into one lively, emotionally satisfying story.
  93. The savviest and most exciting Bond adventure in years, and that's because there's actually something at stake in it.
  94. Riveting true-life drama.
  95. While this sequel lacks the novelty of the first course, it's just as soulful and silly.
  96. I will salute the deftness and intelligence with which Goldfinger observes the reactions of the living to the revelations of the dead.

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