Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,643 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Half Nelson
Lowest review score: 0 Molly
Score distribution:
5643 movie reviews
  1. If you’re willing to surrender to his singular vision, you might just walk out of the theater seeing the world in a new way — which is probably more than you can expect from the new Kevin Hart comedy.
  2. Keira Knightley, in a witty, vibrant, altogether superb performance, plays Lizzie's sparky, questing nature as a matter of the deepest personal sacrifice.
  3. Here, in paranoid, bad acid trip form, is the real birth of girl power.
  4. Mesmerizing.
  5. In hovering, The Squid and the Whale becomes its own realistic display of family entropy, as cautionary as it is educational.
  6. The School of Rock was made by gifted veterans of the American indie scene, but it's still the most unlikely great movie of the year.
  7. The clever and infectious reboot of the amazingly enduring sci-fi classic, director J.J. Abrams crafts an origin myth that avoids any hint of the origin doldrums. That's because he rewires us back into the original Star Trek's primal appeal.
  8. Moving and marvelous new cross-cultural family saga.
  9. Gerwig, who previously starred in Baumbach's "Greenberg," is charmingly awkward. And Sumner (Sting's daughter) is an ace with deadpan one-liners.
  10. Around town, Stephen Fry ("Peter's Friends"), as a fluty artiste, dogs Flora with his devotion and declares, "I'm engorgedly in love with you!" That's how I feel about this gem.
  11. A disturbingly avid re-creation of the last six weeks in the life and slow, self-imposed wasting of Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands.
  12. The facts are so awful that Dear Zacharycan be forgiven much of its antsiness--as a memorial, as a condolence to Bagby’s parents (who became activists for judicial reform in their late son's honor), and as a howl of grief.
  13. It's a hilarious, and unexpectedly moving, documentary about the greatest metal band you've probably never heard of.
  14. The Trip looks like a lark - and is - yet there's a sneaky resonance to the way it celebrates what acting means to these two rogue cutups.
  15. Shot in spooky gradations of silver and shadow, The Prisoner of Azkaban is the first movie in the series with fear and wonder in its bones, and genuine fun, too.
  16. It's better than good; it's such a crackling and mature and accomplished movie that it just about restores your faith.
  17. If I respect Downfall more than I was enthralled by it, that's because its portayal stops short of revelation. Once you witness Hitler's denial, the film has little more to say about him.
  18. The Spectacular Now doesn't shrink from being an all-out teen movie (it has hookups and a senior prom). Yet it's one of the rare truly soulful and authentic teen movies. It's about the experience of being caught on the cusp and not knowing which way you'll land.
  19. The film’s glacial pacing and drily absurd tone mimic their relationship with a bit too much discipline.
  20. The end will haunt you.
  21. Out of the zany strictures of Dogma 95...Danish newcomer Thomas Vinterberg has made a funny, volatile, visually dynamic story about the unraveling of one extended family during the course of a patriarchal 60th-birthday dinner.
  22. Where "No End" is cool and measured, Taxi is hot, anguished, and sometimes as difficult to watch as pictures of torture ought to be.
  23. Footnote is itself a perfect little piece of Talmud, full of text, commentary, and colorful argument.
  24. As sharp and slick as Steve Jobs is, it ends up feeling more interested in entertainment than enlightenment.
  25. Marley was directed by the gifted Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland), who shows off his chops not by doing anything dazzling - the film is documentary prose, not poetry - but by treating Marley as a man of depth and nuance, of inner light and shadow.
  26. Shot in vivid black and white, the movie is like "Village of the Damned" directed by Ingmar Bergman, only without Bergman's intensity.
  27. So overstuffed with random fireworks that despite its politics, it's easy to imagine the film getting a four-star rave from Bush or Saddam.
  28. The story itself is so powerful and troubling, the moral geometry so vertiginous, and the photography so big that anything other than the natural sounds of snowfall and footfall is a Flat Earth Society intrusion.
  29. As Demme's audienc we're at the mercy of political passion overshadowed by style.
  30. A triumph -- Demme's finest work since "The Silence of the Lambs," and a movie that tingles with life.

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