Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,045 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A Prophet
Lowest review score: 0 What the #$*! Do We (K)now!?
Score distribution:
6045 movie reviews
  1. This story of a 12-year-old boy who drops through the net of middle-class life invites us-in each shimmering frame-to gaze upon the world with a child's freshly awakening vision.
  2. Lavish with stunning imagery, the experience will ripple into your dreams.
  3. The result is something as original as it is unlikely: a study in grief that is flooded with happiness.
  4. The uncoagulated anguish of parents mourning the death of a child has rarely been more powerfully depicted than in the collected vignettes of grief, rage, and retribution that make up the riveting domestic drama In the Bedroom.
  5. Ten
    A glimpse into a society that has grown more open, more free, and also more casually selfish in its interpersonal aggression.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    But it's Polanski who pries the genre open until it goes metaphysical.
  6. It is their shared strength as a band of brothers humble before their Christian God - and indeed before the God of Islam - that may stir viewers to an awe that transcends skeptical opinions about religion or politics.
  7. In The Beaches of Agnès, you get addicted to watching Agnès Varda watch the world.
  8. Sweaty and claustrophobic, exciting and horrifying at the same time, it never lets us forget we're riding aboard a giant, primitive tin can, a hunk of industrial machinery that mingles the illusion of omnipotence with the reality of a floating prison cell. [Director's Cut]
  9. Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
  10. Argo is never less than wildly entertaining, but a major part of its power is that it so ominously captures the kickoff to the world we're in now.
  11. The movie is pulp, yet it attains a surprising emotional power-especially when Anjelica Huston's Lilly, a survivor who'll do whatever it takes to master her surroundings, is on-screen.
  12. Ozon specializes in dissecting the vulnerability, erotic longing, and garbled intentions with which people regularly rub up against one another.
  13. The rare Hollywood epic that dares to entertain an audience by engaging the world.
  14. Like everything else in this superb work of art, ''Shrinking Lover'' is exquisitely Almodóvarian. It's funny, tender, a little shocking, and it pays homage to what we know about movies: that they can move us beyond words.
  15. Still the grandest of all science-fiction movies.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. What the activist drama "Fast Food Nation" does with talk and the aid of movie stars, Our Daily Bread, a riveting documentary by Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, does even better, with no voice-over and barely a word spoken by the unidentified workers involved in matter-of-fact killing and harvesting.
  17. It's also one of the great movies of the year - an ambitious, challenging, and creatively hot-blooded but cool toned project that picks seriously at knotty ideas about American personality, success, rootlessness, master-disciple dynamics, and father-son mutually assured destruction.
  18. Mr. Lazarescu is that rich and riveting a film of universal small human moments and big-system failure.
  19. Gliding from the physical to the metaphysical, Andersen reveals how films like ''Chinatown'' effectively remade the reality of Los Angeles, replacing history with myth in a way that now anchors the city more than that history itself does.
  20. Sad, menacing, empathetic story.
  21. City of Ghosts shows us what journalism can do in the face of evil. Its message is haunting, humane, and ultimately hopeful.
  22. There's a painterly translucence to this ''Springtime,'' and a mystery, too; each frame is as delicately poised and lit as a Vermeer portrait of a woman, beckoning but unknowable.
  23. In the grim and empathetic lost-youth drama Sweet Sixteen, the director focuses on a few failed souls -- rather than excoriate the system that failed them -- to produce a story of particularly streamlined, eloquent despair.
  24. The film is sublime entertainment, at once ticklish and suspenseful, cynical and sincere. By its very existence, Altman's comedy about the death of Hollywood lets you know that movies are still alive and kicking.
  25. With Wright in the driver’s seat, your standard getaway driver story is transformed into a giddy, adrenaline-filled joyride that’ll leave you gripping the edge of your seat and tapping your feet.
  26. Don't tell Walt Disney, but Hayao Miyazaki really holds the keys to the magic kingdom.
  27. Strong builds a poignant, methodical portrait of loss.
  28. You know you're in the hands of a true filmmaker when you feel invited, at every turn, to share his sense of entrancement. I got that feeling in just about every frame of American Beauty.
  29. This is essential viewing for understanding our world.

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