Exclaim's Scores

  • Music
For 2,944 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Queen of the Wave
Lowest review score: 10 Excuse My French
Score distribution:
2944 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an impressive compilation of provocatively disparate ideas, but taken in in its intended order, there's a mesmerizing continuity to it all.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a mature and refined album woven deeply enough into pop's historical fabric to please connoisseurs, but with enough lightness and fun for casual appeal as well.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Age of Absurdity is tacky, unoriginal, occasionally annoying and altogether not good. Most of the blame falls squarely on vocalist Neil Starr, whose lyrics stumble through sleaze rock clichés that were already dated in 1988.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There are some truly enjoyable moments on Calexico's latest--but they're vastly overshadowed by at turns annoying or just boring tracks, bogged down in an overly long record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mother finds Xylouris White quietly questioning musical structure and expectations. They remain trailblazing outliers with a supernatural power to express themselves as one and, with a warmth and welcoming generosity of spirit, invite listeners to step up and out of their comfort zones.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the work of ravenous, restless musicians who refuse to be pigeonholed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Snares Like a Haircut might be their most accessible and uplifting record yet; released in a time of social decay, it's a statement that rings loud and clear.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Too often the band fall prey to the conventions of the music from which they're borrowing.
    • Exclaim
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike her Polaris Prize-winning 2015 record Power in the Blood, there are no love songs; Medicine Songs is unflinching in its focus.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I Like Fun remains a strong, if not exactly noteworthy album, simply because TMBG are a strong band that can pull off anything at this point, and although newcomers looking for examples of their late-career excellence should probably start with recent gems like Glean or Nanobots, longtime fans will find much to like here, crunchy guitars and all.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recorded in France and produced by Frames guitarist David Odlum, this is expertly crafted and lushly arranged folk-rock, with some pretty fabulous horns.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Maine's ability to draw out peculiar emotions and thoughtfully pairing them with euphoric sounds in a deliberate way makes The House a natural and more than satisfying sequel to Pool.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, The Official Body remains confined to rudimentary rock arrangements and rigid structures. It doesn't reconcile these contradictions until its final three tracks, which makes for restless, if brief, listening in its middle entries.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cogent and catchy all at once, I can feel you creep into my private life shows that, even amid doubt and distress, Tune-Yards can find a new way forward.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite this influx of collaborative talent, things sound largely the same on this album, but with a project as reliable as the Go! Team, that's not necessarily a bad thing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lyrically and sonically, Ruins helps First Aid Kit gives listeners a mature, realized and often heartbreaking version of this young band's oeuvre.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Overall, No Cross No Crown is for diehard fans; those who want to hear something new will be disappointed.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album melds its many ideas into some larger parts, with just nine songs clocking in at roughly 40 minutes. But true to form, POST- is still all sorts of bonkers in mostly the right ways.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite occasionally overlong runtimes, Rainbow Mirror is an album that encourages introspection and submerging oneself in their unconscious. It's a monument that both inspires and terrifies.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Full Closure and No Details feels more like a journey to the closure Cohen seeks through her songwriting than an answer itself — and what an important and journey it is.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Through fragmentation, each track finds cohesion, making deconstruction — the silences, gaps, twisted repetitions, abrupt cuts, looped production, harried noise--the story itself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At 34, the New Orleans multi-instrumentalist is too young to have his work described in terms of a career peak, but these albums are so nearly flawless that it's difficult to imagine how he can get any better.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Similar to how Drake and Future on What a Time to Be Alive, the two collaborators have trouble finding common ground here. They're equally impressive in their own right but they rarely connect, and when they try on each other's styles, it's awkward.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While previous instalments Muscle Up and School Daze were comprised of early, experimental college compositions, Afternooners is more focused and assured.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tracks like the rambling "Old Things," the hoedown-lite "Bluebird" and perhaps the most precious song about outlaw life, "Private Property," shoot for middle-of-the-road appreciation, sucking out any grit from the recording.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His latest LP, the 13-song Pressure, is a quality collection of songs that core fans will undoubtedly embrace.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like the 6 God's "playlist," this mixtape has no higher purpose than to let its creators run wild, showcasing their prodigious talents with frequent moments of pop brilliance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    We can say that the real Slim Shady does show up and prove himself on a handful of Revival's songs, but many of the more 'noteworthy' moments are buried under a mountain of contradictions and cringe-worthy attempts at shock value.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As anarchic as it may seem on first listen, No_One Every Really Dies smoothes out a little more with each play. It's a strong comeback for the daring trio.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Outside of nostalgia, though, much of the work still feels necessary.