Fact Magazine (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 428 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Trilogy
Lowest review score: 10 >Album Title Goes Here<
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 428
428 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ruins is one of her finest works, full to the brim with emotion in spite of the aching space at its heart.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Metal is an exceptional record. It is a stronger, more complete statement even than that seen on The Redeemer, primarily because it lays bare its own contradictions.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An extremely promising debut.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite a couple of missteps and the odd moment of doubt, I can't remember the last time a series of three full-length records released this close together has captured me--and others--in the way that this has.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For music that is over 15 years old, Back on Time sounds as fresh as a sitar-wielding half-stepping daisy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gorgeous, beguiling, strange and way way out there, records like this restore a sense of mystery and wonder to the world.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than limiting this EP's scope, restricting it to the use of only one synthesizer allows Terje's innate quirkiness and sense of humour even more room to maneuver.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fin
    Despite its patchier moments, fIN's effective command of light and shade make for an involving listen, and it's a sound that's pretty much Talabot's own.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Patience (After Sebald) is an unnervingly quiet album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burial's appointment as cemetery caretaker, presiding over the skeletons of rave, was always going have limited traction--after all, there's only so many ways you can express a bereavement--but perhaps in this EP he's found new purpose amongst the ruins.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record that pushes a catholic range of sounds through filter after filter, and turns out something at once smudgy and beautiful.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Skillfully and bewitchingly arranged, its neatest trick is in the way it enfolds so many distinct personalities into Glasper's own vision, his music always complementing their voices without ever being dominated by them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's very difficult not to like these songs--for their clarity and craftmanship, but also the strength of their ideas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    4Eva and a Day is--modestly, but definitely--a triumph.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Everything about the record suggests a separation and a self-contained existence, like a second novel, and is wonderful for it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Acousmatic Sorcery's imperfections are unapologetic and unconcerned, largely stamping all over any chances of bringing the overall experience down.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Voices From The Lake is serene and sinister, hides more than it reveals and is so entirely absorbing that you could lose yourself in it indefinitely.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a collection of intriguing, often beautiful miniatures--gems to be cherished and enjoyed, sonic curiosities that reward repeated listening.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best footwork album released by Planet Mu to date, and sits comfortably in the upper echelons of their discography. Traxman has set the bar incredibly high.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Five songs coming in just under 18 minutes of superior darkly-stranded pop music.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LHF offer up their most extensive, immersive work to date.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reform Club's prime influences may be rooted in techno's past but what it lacks in formal innovation it more than makes up for with a rich and profound personal expression that will keep you company long after the rest of the world has shut down for the night.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result leaves the listener with less of a sense of control and more of an experience controlled by someone who knows exactly what they are doing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unobtrusively profound statement, cradled in soft-focus melancholy, it's a willowy but towering expression of disassociation, and deeply moving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I wouldn't be surprised if it ends up as the best dubstep album released this year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music is certainly some of El's most engaging yet, and should possess real lasting power.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With this record Laurel Halo has created a strong work that, while being notable and challenging for its unusual, compact combination of pop, ambience and musique concrète, is also immersive and enjoyable for this exact reason.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not without faults, but overall it's a undoubtedly a very welcome gift.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It stands out as one of the year's most demanding, lasting listens.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Kemp's uncompromising beat patterns and bouncing, funk-infused basslines that ultimately deserve the spotlight here.