Hitfix's Scores

For 546 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 O.J.: Made in America
Lowest review score: 0 Work It : Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 338
  2. Negative: 0 out of 338
338 tv reviews
  1. Young's performance continues to be extraordinary, with a monologue late in the premiere all but guaranteed to raise the dust level in your home as you watch it. But it's a measure of the work McKinnon and the supporting actors have done in demonstrating how the smaller conflicts in the lives of Amantha or Ted Jr. or Tawney can be just as powerful (to them and to us) as Daniel's larger existential crisis.
  2. Even with Walt's apparent victory over all who would seek to deny him, his genius and his strength, Breaking Bad is still a perfect model of filmed suspense.
  3. It's still Homeland, and it's good.
  4. ESPN's newest 30 for 30 film O.J. Simpson: Made in America proves to not only be better than The People v. O.J.--and among the best things ESPN has aired in its history--but a perfect complement to the FX show.-
  5. They know how great the show looks, they know how much their actors can give them, and they know just how much they can get away with.
  6. The second season may be even better than the first.... Here's an anthology miniseries follow-up that recaptures all that worked well in the original, even as it's forging its own identity.
  7. Louie viewers don't know exactly what they're getting in any given week, but the show is so elastic that nothing it tries feels like something it shouldn't.
  8. It is entirely its own thing, and it is one of the very best shows on television. We're lucky to have it back.
  9. There is nothing else on television quite like it, and for those who have the patience to sit through Daniel's still, slow journey, the emotional rewards are enormous.
  10. Homeland functions terrifically as both a thriller and a commentary on our post-post-9/11 world, where the War on Terror and the concept of being constantly under surveillance are both facts of life.
  11. It's the best new TV show debuting anywhere this fall, by a long stretch.
  12. The deeper you go, the more powerful The Returned gets.
  13. This isn't the best four-episode stretch the series has ever had--as with most cable dramas, the ends of GoT seasons tend to be stronger than the starts--but there's a sense of real forward momentum to the proceedings that hasn't always been there in the past. Again and again, my pulse quickened as I watched these four hours.
  14. This is a great show, which you might expect given the number of "Parks" veterans involved (including Mike Schur in a godfather capacity as one of the executive producers), but which still feels surprising given the show's clever structure and eagerness to embrace other perspectives.
  15. Darn it if Justified showrunner Graham Yost and company haven't found a way to equal--if not top--that bunch [of opponents], while at the same time building on the lessons they learned in the first season.
  16. Broadchurch is a police procedural, and an effective one, but what renders it special is the way it tracks the ways that physical and emotional violence haunts everyone in the town.
  17. Game of Thrones remains a very entertaining series set in a very rich world. But the longer it’s on, the more it feels like Benioff and Weiss are only scratching the surface of that world--even if that may be the only way to coherently explore it.
  18. Now, I wouldn't say I loved it. Parts of it I didn't even like. I became quite engaged with what was going on downstairs with the servants, while I found virtually everything having to do with the Granthams (at least the parts unrelated to how they dealt with the staff) a chore to get through.
  19. By forcing Raylan to retrace his father's decades-old steps, Yost is reinventing his show yet again, but he's also going deeper into the heart and mind of the man with the big hat and gun.
  20. Through seven of its eight hours (HBO didn't give critics the finale in advance), it's vital and gripping. It's not an imitator dressing itself up in the trappings of a classic HBO drama, but the real deal.
  21. If Atlanta is a surprise, it's frequently an excellent one.
  22. BoJack Horseman is somehow one of TV's funniest comedies and most affecting dramas all in one weird, addictive little package.
  23. Silly or sober, Louie is one of the best shows on television.
  24. The treatment is serious, thoughtful, and an introductory triumph for this American Crime Story franchise.
  25. As the follow-up to an incredibly strong debut season, it's even more fun.
  26. This is an amazing show, beautifully acted and simply beautiful to look at (early episodes this season were directed by Stephen Gyllenhaal, Lawrence Trilling, and Billy Gierhart), with a keen appreciation for faith and family and community that eludes even some of TV's more celebrated dramas.
  27. It's the show it was last year, but in many ways better.
  28. The sheer number of colorful characters maneuvering keeps things lively.
  29. Masters of Sex has much more on its mind than simply the tumultuous relationship between its two famous central characters. But if it just had those two, it would still be among the best things you could watch on television this summer.
  30. As great as both McDormand and Jenkins are in the lead roles (both are early Emmy frontrunners), their story ultimately feels too repetitive--the miniseries plays as a collection of anecdotes designed to make the same point over and over and over again--to justify the running time.
  31. The good news is that nearly everything that went wrong last season goes right at the start of this one. ... "Justified" is again fun and scary and thrilling.
  32. It's one of the most purely funny shows on television--where many "comedies" are really dramas in half-hour form, and others are likable but rarely laugh-out-loud funny--and it's only more confident, sharp and very much its own thing in the new season.
  33. The premiere suggests that the only other show that belongs with it in the discussion for the best drama on television is the same one we were talking about last season. At the top level, there is "Breaking Bad," and there is also--finally, thankfully, exceptionally--Mad Men, and then there is everything else.
  34. The last thing television needs is more serial killer dramas. But when they're this well made, this smart and creative and unexpectedly funny? Then, yes, more Hannibal, please.
  35. Season 2 finds ways to introduce even greater tension, even as [Philip and Elizabeth are] a more fundamentally sound unit, while also adding a whodunnit element that spices things up nicely.... Absolutely dynamite.
  36. As with the best of these broad canvas series, the players and their allegiances become clear within an episode or two. And from that point on, Boardwalk Empire becomes everything that HBO (and I) had hoped for it.
  37. When you're smart men writing about the smartest man of all, you may feel the need to demonstrate your smarts in every possible way, with every beat of the story. But Holmes and Watson are such enduring characters, and these versions written and played so well, that they don't always require such elaborate mental gymnastics.
  38. I came into the series expecting a raunchy black comedy, and got that, but with the added bonus of something achingly beautiful when it wanted to be.
  39. The other six episodes I've seen have their ups and downs, but that's kind of the nature of the beast with comedies that push the outer edge of the envelope of taste and common decency; their batting average will be lower than their comedy peers, but their slugging percentage will be higher.
  40. Casual still stands out among this group [of lo-fi dramas] because the writing and performances are so specific and so smart that it doesn't feel like a spin-off of six other shows.
  41. It continues to be one of the most satisfying dramas in the history of the medium.
  42. Again and again, the show toggles between shock humor and sentiment like the two are the most natural fit in the world. Tonally, the show's a miracle, on top of just being balls-out funny.
  43. This is an absolute: Top of the Lake is great.
  44. Last summer, the show's quality was a surprise because of what it was about and where it aired. Now, UnREAL isn't surprising. It's just thrilling.
  45. It definitely has a voice, and it's a great one: witty and wise and warm and not exactly like anything you've heard before.
  46. The two central performances are so powerful, the dialogue so evocative, the look so intense, that they speak to the value of the hybrid anthology format Pizzolatto is using here--which, along with FX’s “American Horror Story,” points to a potentially fascinating shift in dramatic series television.
  47. The show's as cynical as ever, but it doesn't feel nearly as empty. Selina's more of an actual character--and has become an accomplished slinger of four-letter verbiage in her own right--and even if the team's screw-ups remain inevitable, the ways in which they screw up feel far less predictable.
  48. Almost everything that made the show a treat a year ago is present for the new season.
  49. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has only gotten better, more confident, and more consistent as it's moved along. It knows exactly who its heroine is, what she's good at and what makes her terrifying, just as well as it has very quickly and appealingly figured out how to turn any potential weaknesses into additional strengths.
  50. Masters of Sex is the best new show of the fall by a very long stretch. It's also a refreshing anomaly: a prestige cable drama that doesn't feel like a recombination of elements from 15 shows that came before it.
  51. It's so small and spare and simple, and yet it can be incredibly effective at what it does. Nice to have it back.
  52. Over the course of the first four episodes (and hopefully over the remaining six), the TV Fargo establishes itself as its own wonderful thing that is connected to the movie without being a recreation of it, and that doesn't seem unworthy of the name.
  53. Thanks to committed performances from Cumberbatch and Freeman, and clever writing from Moffat and Gatiss, most of it works splendidly.
  54. Almost every scene demands that the viewer asks why it was presented in that particular fashion--not in a way that distracts from the narrative, but only helps convey the themes of the piece. And as the series jumps ahead to 1901, it's becoming more ambitious in those themes and its articulation of them.
  55. It's essentially a six-hour lecture on zoning regulations, municipal codes, and why integration remained such a thorny issue long after the civil rights era of the '60s. But if it's a lecture, it's an engaging, emotional, and surprisingly light on its feet one.
  56. The season's first two episodes confirm everything that was obvious by the end of last year: Jimmy's doomed attempt to play things straight and not go back to his con man Slippin' Jimmy ways is much too fertile an area to be abandoned so quickly. It feels like a creative choice rather than a commercial one (as opposed to all those times Dexter Morgan managed to evade the brilliant investigators at Miami Metro because his ratings were too high), and the choice plays out in fascinating ways early in Saul season 2.
  57. It's a smart mix of soap opera, music and political intrigue.
  58. Season five is a definite improvement on season four, but only to a point. There aren't as many different stories rattling around, but the show's still so crowded that it has to bounce from scene to scene, subplot to subplot, so quickly that very little gets a chance to breathe.
  59. All these different time periods and tones don't always fit together comfortably, and the four episodes Netflix made available for review are trying so many different things each time out that some feel like they're from entirely different series. ... But when Lady Dynamite hits on the right absurd note, it is spectacularly funny and feels original and vibrant.
  60. The ideas behind most of these developments are fine, but they get thrown at the viewer so haphazardly as to require dramatic organ music when each is introduced.
  61. Ultimately, the good in Normal Heart outweighs the bad, which isn't always the case with Murphy's work. It's an important story packed with vivid individual moments, but with this material and these actors, it feels like it could be so much more than what it is.
  62. The first episode, at least, is terrific, with a distinct, involving tone, and it does very right by its leads.
  63. It's a big swing for ABC and for Ridley, and if it's not a home run, it's also far from a big whiff.
  64. Absorbing in fits and starts, but ultimately so didactic and, especially, humorless that I'm probably comfortable leaving the story--and the series--here.
  65. Bee had a very strong first show, chowing down on the low-hanging fruit that is both sides of this current presidential election.
  66. So the atmosphere and central performances feel worthy of telling one story over 13 hours. My concern is whether the story can say the same.
  67. "Hannibal" is one of the very best shows on television. But it's also so extreme in depicting violence and its aftermath — even in this heightened fashion, and often with a dry, absurdist sense of humor about it — that it's not one I would insist every serious TV fan must watch.
  68. In season two, the strengths of Treme remain strengths, while some of the show's weaknesses have been much improved.
  69. The new season starts a bit slow.... But it's all laying the groundwork for a gripping, almost nightmarish second half of the season in which the life of every member of the Gregson family seems in danger of splintering as badly as Tara's psyche.
  70. The darker and more complicated life gets for the Sons, the better the TV show tends to be. And based on the four episodes I've seen, Sons is still at the incredible level it achieved a year ago, when it became one of the best dramas on television.
  71. Insecure is less inherently dramatic than some of the other Comedies In Theory, which makes the infrequency of laugh-out-loud moments a bigger issue than on, say, Casual, but Rae is a really engaging writer and performer, and the series is charming and compulsively watchable.
  72. Despite whatever aesthetic limitations it may have, The Curious Case of Curt Flood manages to tell a solidly complete version of the story over its 90 minutes, resisting the temptation to make this a simple hagiography.
  73. It's a perfect marriage of creative team, channel and subject.
  74. As with the first season, the stories keep tiptoeing up to cliché before shuffling into more interesting and complicated emotional territory.
  75. Nurse Jackie season 4 is all consequences, all the time--and is much, much more satisfying overall as a result.
  76. Downton in season 3 is still a soap opera (as it was in season 1, as well), but it's a smarter one; it's harder to see the puppet strings Fellowes is pulling this year to get to his desired outcomes.
  77. What makes these episodes feel extra-special is the sense of purpose to them. There's a big story being told here--not one that requires you to watch every episode (though your funny bone will thank you if you do), but one that seems to raise the stakes for everyone involved, and which makes the jokes funnier, the characters richer, in the process.
  78. Orange remains as sharp and funny and poignant as ever.... It's one of TV's very best shows, no matter how you slice it.
  79. The miniseries is filled with superb, lived-in performances, but especially by Kirby, Page, Rose, Whitaker, and Meyers. The cast (which also includes, at various points, Mekhi Phifer, T.I., Chad L. Coleman, Erica Tazel, Anna Paquin, James Purefoy, Matthew Goode, and Sedale Threatt Jr., among many others) and crew had an impossible task in front of them, and they rose to the challenge.
  80. So long as Elba's on the screen, I'm interested, and even more when he and Wilson are sharing it. But ultimately, Luther turned out to be more average than I thought at first, regardless of its country of origin.
  81. It's a show that stands entirely on its own while never forgetting the series that inspired it.
  82. Along the course of these six episodes, the show touches on various rom-com tropes about disapproving parents (Carrie Fisher is, as always, a treat as Rob's cynical mother), secret meetings with exes, bachelor and bachelorette parties that spin out of control, etc. But they're all dealt with in such a specific and simple way that they feel unique to these characters and their world, rather than the obligatory stumbles on the path to a happy ending.
  83. It took me a while to overcome the "been there, analyzed that" feelings I had in the opening episodes, as Paul and his patients began the familiar dance, wherein they talk about only what they're comfortable talking about while Paul, like a good detective, tries to solve the mystery of what's really bothering them.
  84. This doesn't feel like a factory product, but a work of individual, beautiful craftsmanship.
  85. Happy Valley is so effective at what it sets out to do, and so neat in fitting all its pieces together (up to the way the story's climax evokes a much milder incident from early in the series), that I'm a bit ambivalent about the fact that a second season has already been ordered. Lancashire is so good that I won't necessarily mind getting to watch more of her in this role, but this particular story is so unique to her in a way that no sequel season can be.
  86. It would be easy for all this reinvention to feel jarring, or like Halt desperately racing from one idea to the next because the last one ran out of steam. But each transition has felt natural, earned, and of a piece with what came before.
  87. There are still great ideas--and one great episode, "San Junipero," that I'd put up against the best previous installments(*)--but on the whole it's much more uneven than the show's previous output.
  88. Fey and Carlock have delivered basically the same show they did a year ago. Given how great that original NBC version was, I can't really complain. If your biscotti recipe is already deliciously weird, why change the ingredients?
  89. Overall, a solid but not riveting premiere. No goosebumps ala Eric in the halftime locker room last year, but as always, it's good to be back in Dillon.
  90. Normal is overrated. Give me whimsy, dreams and Evil Troy and Evil Abed any day. Give me extraordinary. Give me Community.
  91. The Honorable Woman is really a thriller and, at its best, it's on a level with something like "Homeland" at its best.
  92. It would be very easy for the remaining producers of multi-cam to leave that [dramatic] stuff to their more fashionable counterparts and just stick to telling jokes. Mom, thankfully, is a strong reminder of just how elastic this 64-year-old format is.
  93. I was encouraged that the character-driven third episode was stronger than the zombie action-heavy second, and perhaps the producers will be proven right--that the longer this saga goes on past these initial six episodes, the more it will set itself apart from the zombie canon.
  94. For some, the six hours of Rectify will feel like a very slow sentence indeed. For others, the performances, the very clear sense of time and place, the beautiful images and the thoughtful things the series has to say about life, death and spirituality will feel like no time at all.
  95. The Walking Dead is excellent with action, with suspense, and with atmosphere, and these early episodes have all three in spades.
  96. While there are many extraordinary moments in the new season, there's still enough inconsistency that I'm still waiting for it to become the classic drama it so clearly has the tools to be.
  97. The story never entirely comes together, but it's so much fun watching the supporting cast that coherence almost seems besides the point.
  98. It's a smart, beautifully mounted, and at times very moving production.
  99. Two episodes (one of which many of you may have seen) isn't a big sample size to judge whether Mr. Robot will avoid the sophomore slump. But they're a very promising start, and a continuation of all that made the series so fascinating a year ago.
  100. Michael Hirst's saga of pillaging and migration remains everything it has been almost from its premiere.

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