HOB.com's Scores

  • Music
For 101 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 90 Closer
Lowest review score: 0 Duke Lion Fights The Terror!!
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 101
  2. Negative: 3 out of 101
101 music reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Closer is classic BTE: hopeful melodies, lead singer Kevin Griffin's uniquely sweet voice, enough pop to make you sing along and smile but thoroughly substantial and rewarding.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The White Stripes' songs are so strong, so deliciously simple, it's genius.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rainer Maria still sit solidly in the emo-core genre, yet avoid producing music that is maudlin or obvious. In fact their graceful approach to music is exactly what disguises their insightful and detailed lyrics.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not as immediate as Keep It Like A Secret, or as unified on the sonic surface, but with enough patience, Ancient Melodies of the Future resonates on a level that connects the band's body of work, while also taking it a step further.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Adam's milked a meaty, soulful rock album out of the band…and it is good.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A collection of near perfect (and brief, yes!) lo-fi pop tracks that openly mine the sonic groundwork laid by The Cars, Squeeze and even Led Zeppelin.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the ample cast of guests on The W seems less like a blatant attempt to boost its first week sales than simply a welcome attempt to add to its stylistic diversity. The result is something almost as rare as getting the entire Wu-Tang Clan together: a mainstream rap album that actually sounds like an album instead of a long-playing single.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So at 68 he's still able to churn out songs that are immediately likable, if not instantly classic. For a man who's seemingly suffered from every ailment imaginable in the past few years, his signature baritone remains as strong and expressive as ever, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What's most striking is simply that they are able to take such a drastically different tack with this album and still end up sounding like the same band.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's impressive enough that Wainwright doesn't have the whole orchestra playing at once. But his well thought out arrangements are only the finishing touches on songs that would have held up even if he was given little more than a guitar and a pocket tape recorder to work with.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Alison Krauss & Union Station has a voice like honey, raw and honest and sweet, and she wraps it lovingly around these achy ballads and American Gothic lamentations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Refreshing and ultimately brilliant premiere.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In twelve brutally honest and dark tracks, Reed revisits the best elements of his early work...
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What is most striking about The Sophtware Slump, besides the band's resonating compositions, is its subtle approach towards invoking a strong cathartic response. It's at times a sleepy record with songs that only work as an afterthought, or only make sense when you can focus enough attention on what the band is actually saying. But it has just enough on the surface to strike an initial interest that unfolds, sometimes slowly, sometimes quickly, into the many brilliant aspects of this album and band.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold forays into gospel, R&B and even a little soul (complete with ooh-oohing singers backing Burgess) display a far reaching confidence that rises as the album reveals itself to be not only something swimming in classic influences, but also a path-carving groove maker that falls in line with the likes of Stereo MCs and Jamiroquai.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, there's a lot to be said about G Love's consistency and the way that amid a steadfast formula he never fails to feel fresh.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the better albums released this year...
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of bombastic musings and ethereal compositions is not simply a grab bag of past accomplishments, or a recycling of what works, but a record that yields a wholly different result: An easy sounding album, upbeat and surprisingly positive with not much forced.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lyrically, Haunted progresses from timid to defiant, and ultimately to triumphant. Musically, Poe drifts confidently from trippy beats and spacy sounds to straight ahead rock and mellow, melancholic numbers, though not always in such a way as to strictly parallel the dramatic flow of the album's lyrics. All that means, though, is that this is a dynamic collection of songs and not merely the kind of high-minded rock opera that quickly goes from interesting novelty to pretentious joke. Ignore everything but what comes out of the speakers, and you've got a pop treasure that is as innovative and insightful as it is immediate and unforced.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is more of simply Hersh and an acoustic guitar than her last effort (1999's Sky Motel), but that just gives the appearance of other instruments greater effect. The emotional weight of her often unorthodox sentiments comes from subtle mastery of dynamics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frank Black has dug in deep for this one, and come up with an album that captures the essence of his roots while expanding the realm he's been entrenched in over the last few years.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This self-titled effort is the kind of wall-to-wall spitting, snarling aggression that they haven't fully unleashed on the world since Let's Go.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here the trio trade in the constant reliance on the fuzzed out guitars that led the charge of their steady rise through obscurity for the more subdued moments that have occasionally reared up in past projects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Alvin injects these historic tunes with his own modern flavoring that keeps them fresh in light of their aging repose.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rather than dwell on tragedy or sulk through an album of moodier blues, they deliver a batch of radio-friendly tunes reminiscent of their commercial breakthrough, Four.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This of course is the power of mountain music, the weight it gives to simple instruments and simple folk, and for all of Parton's talents, singing in this medium may very well be her best.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album is often angular, odd, and unpredictable, but always contributing to a relaxed atmosphere.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Testing the limits of what people might want to hear at first, Fisk arguably re-educates us on what music is, and where it comes from, finding rhythm and melody in what many now call Intelligent Dance Music.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The good thing with Mascis is that, even without straying in the least from his recognizable sound, he can maintain some degree of unpredictability in his songs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This album is nothing but a parade of their '70s and '80s hard rock influences worn proudly on their sleeves. And for that, rock 'n' roll fans should be grateful. Time Bomb is one romping anthem after another almost clear through to the end, a "hidden" piano ballad that serves only further cement the band's status as a throwback to the days of overwrought arena rock.