Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,817 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Full House: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1015
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1015
1015 tv reviews
  1. It's a funny show, fundamentally, but not always, by intention. Not everything works, or works equally well; like Louie, Louis is only human.... Louie is a thought process made flesh.
  2. Breathtaking, heartbreaking, awe-inspiring and addictive, it remains the single most remarkable feat of television, possibly ever, increasingly admirable for its ability to grow rather than simply sustain.
  3. [Master of None] is smart, sweet and funny in ways both familiar and fresh.
  4. A dozen characters, played by the inevitably glorious assortment of British actors, crisscross in an astonishingly fluid game of cat's cradle, bringing this small town miraculously to life but never straying too far, or too absurdly, from the narrative through line.
  5. The artfully composed images are both crystal clear and cinematically creamy.
  6. The case [A Scandal in Belgravia] is much more complicated than that [photos involving a member of the British family] of course, so much more that it, as with the episodes that follow, occasionally threatens to collapse under its own writhing weight. Fortunately, the thrill of Sherlock Holmes was never so much plot as character.
  7. Real talk shows should be as acutely funny.
  8. Downton Abbey, which premieres Sunday, is this generation's "Upstairs, Downstairs," both in theme--the daily dramas of a titled British family and their many servants--and in stature.
  9. It sings. Mournfully, triumphantly, poignantly, of failed dreams and second chances; of the simple mistakes that accumulate into tragedy, of the cold calculations required by redemption. But mostly it sings of itself, an anthem to television’s unique power to turn a series of understated performances into sustained magnificence.
  10. Atlanta is subtle and human, a beautifully played comedy of place and character.
  11. A striking six-week miniseries delivering one of the rawest, truest, most provocative and involving dramas ever beamed to Americans. And one of the most important, defining a seedy, destructive junkie subculture in vivid, aching detail in the tradition of such theatrical films as "Panic in Needle Park," "Drugstore Cowboy" and "Trainspotting." [14 Apr 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  12. [Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski] and their fellow writers do a good job getting the information out, (mostly) without making the dialogue too obviously expository; it happens at times, but it almost can't be helped. As producer and sometimes director, Murphy keeps the production pretty level-headed-- not documentary naturalism, exactly, but close enough for respect.
  13. Season 2 finds Rae and company just as wonderfully messy and entertaining as they were when we first met them back in 2016.
  14. Many heads bend over this adaptation, each belonging to a master of his or her craft, and what emerges is a truly new, and miraculously accurate, definition of epic television.
  15. American Crime artfully follows several different narratives that end up moving through the same obstacle course but with very different outcomes. The buildup is slower here and requires more patience than the last two seasons, partly because this installment of American Crime is more ambitious and covers more terrain.
  16. It's not quite perfection. Nearly everything to do with the character of Piper's fiancé, Larry (Jason Biggs), somewhat based on Kerman's now-husband Larry Bloom, seems problematic to me. Similarly, in emphasizing the humanity of the inmates, their warders have been made to look, for the most part, pathetic, foolish or monstrous. That is remedied in part this season by a deeper look at the staff, even as some of the more difficult prisoners, like Uzo Aduba's Crazy Eyes, are brought into better focus.
  17. Breaking Bad is as good as a show on this subject could possibly get, but the subject has its drawbacks. I like it, I admire it, but I can't say I enjoy it.
  18. In a more refreshing fantasy, Boomtown's L.A. appears to be almost a one-medium town. In early episodes, at least, there are no local TV pests to harass Little and her publication, who have the news all to themselves. Which is one more reason why some of us think so highly of this series. [28 Sept 2002, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  19. In Season 2 the issues and tensions remain the same, but perfectly dialed up a notch or two.
  20. This is a beautifully constructed space for a viewer to occupy for a while, while the story plays out--it's a place to go, though, title aside, that place is not necessarily, or ever, Fargo, N.D.
  21. [A] lovely, ruthless, masterfully restrained two-night, four-hour contemplation of love, marriage, parenthood, mental illness and identity.
  22. For all its willful outrageousness, Arrested Development is sort of gripping -- a continuing story that one actually wants to see continue, which is more than can be said of most of the new dramas the season produced. [31 Oct 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  23. Tig
    A frank look at the many things that make a life, that change a life, without embroidery or quick-hit editing.
  24. There is a current of delight that runs through the show different from other reality contestants, where the grown-ups may feel they have their lives on the line; there is disappointment here, but little bitterness.
  25. Larry is getting a little ridiculous... and a little too mean even for Larry. [7 Sep 2007]
    • Los Angeles Times
  26. It works because it's less about who we were then--it's a fantasy of who we were then, really--than about who we are now.
  27. The show thus far feels more observational than story-driven; it relies on our desire to listen to Rock talk. And we do want to listen, because Rock is hilarious.
  28. Hannibal is much better than it once was, perhaps the guiltiest pleasure on television at this time.
  29. Elizabeth and Philip react with the appropriate amount of fear for and protectiveness of Paige and Henry. No doubt, this will further widen the cracks already forming in their political/professional resolve, but there is no going back: The Americans puts the kids front and center.
  30. It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.

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