Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,109 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 A Serious Man
Lowest review score: 0 Testosterone
Score distribution:
3109 movie reviews
  1. Like his con artists are prone to saying, American Hustle works from the feet up, and the fun is intoxicating.
  2. It is a riveting and memorable performance and Kingsley finds subtlety in Logan where there doesn't seem to be any.
  3. There isn't a moment in the entire film that doesn't feel genuine.
  4. Flowers is a quiet, eloquent movie about big, overwhelming emotions, and the constant presence of its eponymous plants, in all kinds of colors and shapes, is a metaphor for the ways in which we respond to what life throws at us, be it a sudden trauma, a perpetual state of melancholy or an unexpected opportunity for romance. Some people blossom and bloom; others wither and give up.
  5. It's an eye opener to how quickly a society can switch from being open and tolerant to pointing fingers -- and worse -- at those deemed different.
    • Miami Herald
  6. This is an exciting, exceptionally well-made futuristic thriller that also happens to be loaded with lived-in touches and punchy ideas.
  7. Director Ryan Coogler has pulled off a miracle: He taps into the beautiful simplicity and deep well of emotion of the 1976 original, capturing its essence and spirit while branching out into a new story.
  8. A marketable counterpoint to last year’s "Boyhood."
  9. An exuberant, appropriately cynical reinvention of the stalwart Broadway hit that deftly straddles the line between old-fashioned Hollywood musicals and experimental concoctions like last year's "Moulin Rouge."
  10. The result is a gripping psychological thriller that, while lacking the power of "Funny Games," is still the work of a master.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    What makes this sequel work is the charm of its story.
  11. This is a fiendishly complicated whodunit -- or, to be more precise, a who-done-what-to-whom-and-when -- told within the confines of thoughtful, speculative science-fiction.
  12. The film wouldn't work at all, though, if Sarsgaard didn't strike the perfect balance between snaky predator and love-struck fool.
  13. Like "A Separation," which used the story of a dissolving marriage to illustrate the unexpected consequences of a rigid, inflexible society, About Elly turns what starts out as a breezy comedy into an engaging and substantial exploration of human nature and how sometimes, without intending to, we hurt the ones we love most — including ourselves.
  14. This may not be Park’s best or gravest picture. But it might be his most entertaining.
  15. The Wind that Shakes the Barley is a multi-layered story, and the more you see those different aspects, the more you'll enjoy the film.
  16. Harrowing and grueling, Lebanon ends on a gentle, hopeful note.
  17. Won't appeal to everyone, of course, particularly those who blush easily. And parents who take children to see it deserve to have their heads examined. But for those who don't mind a little bile in their eggnog, it's the perfect antidote to all that prefab Christmas cheer.
  18. A script that deftly fleshes out characters and mimics reality shockingly well.
  19. The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
  20. Politics in Three Times is as subtle as the stories being told. The film is probably too slow, too silent and too long for most audiences. But look beyond the quietness, and you'll discover a three-gem jewel.
  21. More than once during The Fast Runner (Atanarjuat), it's easy to forget you're watching a movie.
  22. Knocked Up is filled with comic exchanges and bits of business that, while not essential to the central plot, keep the movie's comedic energy chugging (like Debbie's throwdown with a doorman at a popular nightclub who won't let her in because she's too old).
  23. Shine a Light provides the clearest and most intimate viewing experience of the band to date. It is also a happy circumstance that the group, now in their mid-60s, have rarely sounded tighter.
  24. DiG! is raw, just as the band members themselves.
  25. Rising above simple sentiment to explore class differences and the enduring clash between East and West with wit and wisdom.
    • Miami Herald
  26. This rich, emotionally complex movie finds Almodóvar venturing into trickier, more fascinating territory, even if his themes.
  27. The movie has a longing melancholy that leavens the humor — it’s a surprisingly sad, gentle comedy.
  28. The real trick, of course, was casting the perfect child actor to carry the heavy load, and Tremblay is a wonder. The smart camera work helps highlight Jack’s perspective, but Abrahamson has also coaxed a genuine, marvelous performance out of the kid that’s key to the film’s emotional weight.
  29. An overwhelmingly tactile experience. Scott brings you so close into the action, the grit and smoke and blood seem to spill off the screen and into your head.
    • Miami Herald
  30. Ceylan examines human relationships with an eye for details and a soul for the big picture.
  31. This is the rare breed of Hollywood studio production that has the brash spirit of an independent picture and the sharp wit of a stand-up comic.
  32. The movie fares less well when the plot and Simon’s neuroses come to the surface, but there is some tremendous suspense in the movie’s final scene.
  33. A dreamy, passionate ode to freedom -- of thought, of expression, of every person's innate right to simply be.
    • Miami Herald
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A League of Their Own is as exhilarating as a double- header at Chicago's Wrigley Field. It captures all the familiar baseball sensations, with a curve: the hollow crack of the bat connecting with the ball, the electric tension before that crucial ninth-inning pitch, the team's camaraderie as they spit and adjust their skirts. [1 July 1992, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
  34. The cast is uniformly spectacular, infusing the characters with nuance and complexity.
  35. The experience of watching Funny Games, be it the original or this version, is never forgotten, whatever your ultimate impression of the film.
  36. Virtually everything Americans know about Ellis Island they've learned from the movies, and virtually all those movies were American. Golden Door offers the other side of the story, the one that ends at Ellis Island instead of beginning there.
  37. An excellent legal thriller elevated to superb drama by the actor's (Clooney) central performance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The most memorable aspect of Batman is the film's attention to florid detail. At times, Burton's strange touches upstage the simple good-vs.-evil parable. [23 June 1989, p.H4]
    • Miami Herald
  38. There's nothing in the utterly enchanting Raising Victor Vargas you haven't seen before; you'd just be hard-pressed to name another movie that did it as well.
  39. Unlike "A Separation", in which Iranian culture and mores played critical roles, the theme in The Past is more universal and spelled out in the title.
  40. An exuberant, disarming entertainment.
    • Miami Herald
  41. Has the ring of classic Disney seamlessly combined with a modern-day sensibility.
  42. The results, for the most part, aren't pretty. The newly expanded Balseros, which adds an hour of footage to the previous film, is an even more compelling, if grimmer, work than the original.
  43. Charles Bukowski would have loved this foul-mouthed, fiery, reckless woman. Against all odds and common sense, you will, too.
  44. Children of Men is thrilling, both for its groundbreaking style (there are action sequences here unlike any filmed before) and its complex, vividly realized ideas.
  45. What American Gangster does have -- what makes it such a commanding, exhilarating movie -- is a consummate love and understanding of story.
  46. Burton has found a vehicle sturdy enough to indulge every facet of his imagination: His great visual flair, his sense of whimsy and humor, his fondness for horror and his love of music.
  47. One False Move is by no means a "big" film. Its goals are admittedly modest, and that's the reason it works so well. If you're a fan of Jim Thompson novels (After Dark, My Sweet, The Killer Inside Me ) or Southern-style film noir, don't miss it. [26 June 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
  48. As suspenseful as a full-blown thriller.
  49. Here, finally, is something you've really never seen before.
  50. The movie isn't just hilarious: It's witty and inventive, too, and in hindsight, it isn't even all that dumb.
  51. Shame is fearless in the way the most ambitious art often is, and to write it off for what it doesn't do is reductive and misguided. You don't just watch Shame: You feel it, too.
  52. Unabashedly frank in its depiction of sex -- too frank, probably, for more discreet viewers -- but it's never exploitive or seedy.
  53. Even in its most tedious scenes, Russian Ark is mesmerizing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Marshall, who established himself as a great movie musical director with 2002’s Oscar-winning Chicago, has done a masterful job of collaborating with Sondheim and Lapine to transform their 1987 Tony Award-winning, two-act musical into a film that flows seamlessly as it juggles its intertwining storylines.
  54. Even though it unfolds almost entirely through a child's eyes, and contains no onscreen violence, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas packs as devastating a punch as an adult-oriented drama about the subject. Its concluding five minutes are almost impossible to watch.
  55. Michael Mann's extraordinary Public Enemies is an unusual sort of gangster picture, a near-impressionistic recreation of the last year in the life of one of American history's most notorious bank robbers.
  56. A rarity, a film that preserves the depth and integrity of its source while bringing the story to life in an indelible way.
  57. It's a dry, mundane title. It's also the only thing about the film that doesn't blow your mind right out of its comfortable, I've-seen-all-this-before rut.
  58. The Salt of the Earth is a celebration of the power of art to change the world, as well as an exploration of the considerable toll gifted artists sometimes pay for their talents, and their courage to push forward regardless.
  59. The design of the film is breathtaking at times, veering from the jagged hyperbole of German expressionism to the drolleries of English comedy at its most daft, if not most broad. [7 Feb. 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
  60. The biggest compliment you can pay the much-anticipated film adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is that you can't imagine Stieg Larsson's corker of a story ever having existed in book form.
  61. Despite its scary warnings, the film ends on an upbeat note, unless of course you happen to be Hillary Clinton's campaign manager.
  62. Life of Pi works seamlessly on two levels. With grace, imagination and stunning visual acuity, it explores Martel's twin themes of faith and the power of storytelling. It's also a thrilling action adventure.
  63. A Frenchman may have thought of the story first, but this Korean film pays tribute to the original while perfectly standing on its own.
  64. After the nihilistic deconstruction of Deadpool and the flattening self-importance of Batman v. Superman, Captain America: Civil War reminds you how funny and exciting these pictures can be when they’re done right — you know, like comic books. The summer movie season has barely begun, and already the remedy for superhero film fatigue has arrived.
  65. Movies like Monsters, Inc. literally make you feel like a kid again, marveling at the joyously inventive sights before you, and that's a feat that should not be taken lightly.
  66. Love & Mercy allows you to understand how the lifelong auditory hallucination that haunted Wilson also fueled his creativity. Sometimes, from madness, great art can emerge.
  67. It's an action picture that's been distilled and compressed to its tightest, barest, almost abstract essence, and it's absolutely thrilling.
  68. But Tarantino isn’t glorifying the ugliness; he’s condemning it. He just wants to put on a grand show at the same time. “Are you not entertained?” he seems to be asking. Yes. Yes, we are.
  69. There's a timelessness to her character that makes her real even today. And in Devos' intense portrayal, she's a woman you admire.
  70. It's a sign of just how much Coppola respects her characters that she doesn't make us privy to that final line: It is only meant for them to share. But like the rest of the ethereal Lost in Translation, you don't need to have it spelled out in order to feel it.
  71. It just requires an open mind, a love of film and a willingness to dream.
  72. The overriding point of Into the Abyss, what keeps this sad, sorrowful film from becoming depressing and elevates it far above the usual chatter of liberal-conservative debate, is that there can be light on the other end of even the darkest of tunnels.
  73. Many questions remain purposely unanswered: Where was the father for 12 years? Why did he want to go away with the kids? What's in a box he finds hidden in the island? Yet, in a remarkable ending, the boys discover their feelings.
  74. If "The Sixth Sense" was Shyamalan's take on ghost stories and "Unbreakable" his ode to comic books, then Signs is the evil cousin to Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
  75. As magical as "The Wizard of Oz," the film leaves its spare setting and blooms into action in a colorful springtime world to tell the story of an epic romance lush with silken costumes, giggling courtesans, comic servants and rulers cruel and compassionate.
    • Miami Herald
  76. One of the first things that strikes you about these courageous people, who constantly confront volatile, gun-carrying thugs, is that they outgrew their violent pasts and now live contented lives with their families.
  77. It feels wholly artificial, and your eyes never tire of drinking it all in.
  78. A joyous, amazingly detailed paean to imagination and personal expression that dares -- and succeeds -- to illustrate one of the most mysterious enigmas of all: the creative process.
  79. Don't let it slip out of town without getting a look at it.
  80. The movie is filled with wonderful music, memorable characters and rich, quotable dialogue. But what makes the picture really soar is the way it reminds you what it feels like to fall in love -- and the endless, countless possibilities a new romance brings.
  81. A remarkable movie that merits a place alongside "The Executioner's Song" and "In Cold Blood" as an unforgettable depiction of tragedy in the heartland.
  82. Another strange, sometimes harrowing exercise in absurdity that resonates despite its weirdness.
  83. The movie offers just the right amount of spectacle.
  84. Dench and Blanchett will likely pick up Oscar nominations; no one could improve on either performance.
  85. A portrait of a family reeling with pain and resentment -- and rising to the challenge of dealing with it head-on.
  86. Gerwig, not surprisingly, is a marvel: mercurial, thin-skinned, haughty, desperate, funny, warm, a magnetic presence who mesmerizes the audience in the same way she attracts Tracy.
  87. As usual for the Dardennes, the plot is slight but loaded with hairpin turns of tremendous emotional power.
  88. Offers a ride worth taking -- an excursion through a fantastical pop universe that is pure, enchanting magic. Try it; you'll like it.
  89. “Movies are a machine that helps us generate a little empathy,” Ebert said about films. Life Itself is a lovely, eloquent tribute to a man who devoted his existence to showing us just that.
  90. Bertucelli nails it.
  91. Gordon Gekko didn't disappear with the 1980s; he just became a lot more difficult to pick out from a crowd.
  92. Brings the viewer up close and personal with the face of evil.
  93. Raucous look at an equally raucous phenomenon.
  94. 50/50 is crude and funny, and it demands that you laugh. And you will.
  95. All of Payne's films have been driven by the anger and frustration of his protagonists, but The Descendants is the first one in which sadness lurks behind every frame.
  96. The most compelling -- and horrifying -- portion of the film, which interweaves archival footage and stylish graphics with the interview segments, centers on the firebombing of Japan during World War II.

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