New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Workaholics: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. It's still, for the most part, the exact same show, which is a relief: The fun remains watching a pressure-cooker gathering of a bunch of the alleged "best and brightest," and seeing just how quickly they can act with astounding stupidity. [9 Sep 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  2. All three families seem fairly serious, not just like people who want to be on television. So the details of their new lives seem instructive, even if the lesson is “better them than us.”
  3. It's unavoidable that True Blood will fall into some of the same dramas as other vampire shows. It's just got sharper teeth.
  4. Without taking anything away from “Once Upon a Time”--this one is cleaner and seems to require less cataloging of multiple plotlines.
  5. Aside from a couple of odd pop-culture references (characters played by Amber Riley and the Common busted out glittering iPads at different points in the show) NBC's The Wiz Live! was far tighter and far more fun to watch than last year's awkward production of "Peter Pan" and 2013's high-rated but wooden "The Sound of Music."
  6. He has always been wrapped a little tight but now he's about to explode, and Chiklis plays it beautifully, making it sound as if he must measure every phrase so that just opening his mouth doesn't release all the frustration in a nuclear blast.
  7. What Southland has, already, is its own swagger, a get-outta-my-way style of moving and talking that says it's going for the raw edges we see on cable shows like "Breaking Bad." Southland pulls it off, too. If Thursday night's premiere episode is an indication how it plans to roll, it's a keeper.
  8. The new musical-comedy drama Glee dresses like "High School Musical" and has the heart of "Porky's." That's a compliment.
  9. Crucial, sometimes hopeful and sometimes worrisome as the larger issues of modern medicine are, Hopkins excels on the human side.
  10. It's well-paced, it's fun to watch and none of the characters needs to be anywhere near as annoying as, say, Nick Castle.
  11. Madam Secretary starts off solidly, with an engaging performance by Téa Leoni as the secretary of state.
  12. For viewers, most of the jokes still click.
  13. It’s lethal and funny. Sometimes the new normal looks much like the old.
  14. The jokes flow nicely, the music is fun, and the pop culture references will make almost everyone smile.
  15. Ray Donovan has picked up a couple of new guest stars and in the process picked up its game.
  16. In between the romantic dramas, a lot of sharply written comedy and some long passages of news-wonk stuff, it aims to make viewers do a little thinking.
  17. The dramas, rivalries, kindnesses and treacheries begin almost at once, and as in all the best PBS series, they are well-drawn.
  18. You don't have to know a thing about "Firefly" to enjoy this fascinating victory dance.
  19. As with “Pretty Little Liars,” the viewer knows no more than the characters. And as with “PLL,” it should be fun finding out.
  20. Even if you’ve never wondered how a movie comes about, The Chair makes the process feel almost cinematic.
  21. It's gripping stuff, seamlessly blending the larger tension of the world with the smaller dramas back at 165 Eaton.
  22. HBO’S new miniseries Parade’s End won’t stop the “Downton Abbey” DTs. But it can soothe the pain with wonderful visuals and superb performances by Benedict Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hall and Adelaide Clemens.
  23. For all the familiar elements here, however, nothing feels like a gimmick. It’s a crime-and-cop story with enough time to paint detailed pictures of all the people the murder affects.
  24. It's like three, maybe four sitcoms all squeezed into one, and quite an enjoyable one.
  25. This requires commitment, it requires paying attention and it has few cartoonish interludes to give the audience a breather. It also reminds us the value and satisfaction we can find in a complex production executed well.
  26. It's a fun ride and Wyle has gotten a little better each time. That's why it's a shame there apparently won't be another.
  27. If you enjoy following complex machinations, however, and enjoy watching smart TV characters try to figure them out, Rubicon is your ticket.
  28. House of Cards, like “The West Wing,” has soap and melodrama in its DNA. It also moves at a surprisingly deliberate pace, often seeming to linger on a scene just so it won’t clutter itself up by bringing in too many subplots. Still, the second season maintains the tension of the first season, and the “Bad Boys at Work” sign is still up. Let the binging begin.
  29. If the premise is somewhat forced, it sets up a situation with enough comic potential to sustain Hot in Cleveland indefinitely.
  30. It's a brand new ballgame. It looks to be a winner.
  31. A Cherry drama rises or falls on the pretty simple test of whether it’s fun, and Devious Maids has the right stuff to get to there.
  32. Wright, who already has won an Emmy for the role, remains one of the best parts of the series, while Underwood’s bottomless appetite for dark dealing keeps Spacey so deliciously detestable you can’t help but keep rooting for the bad guy to win.
  33. It's popcorn TV well worth settling in to watch.
  34. Liv is funny as well as charming, and the no-frills CW production keeps the focus on the characters and the stories. iZombie is dead-on.
  35. But if Ugly Americans comes with a message, it is at least equally determined to just be funny, and at that task, it frequently succeeds.
  36. If all "South Park" offered were poo-poo jokes and babes spouting profanity, the show would wear thin awfully fast. It doesn't. The reason is that Parker, Stone and their collaborators actually have done something remarkable with their primitive, construction-paper animation: They have created a wholly new, internally consistent fictional world and have peopled it with distinct, interesting characters. [13 Aug 1997]
    • New York Daily News
  37. This season also takes a few scenes to get into gear. But it’s faster, and Schilling in particular slides right into her new rhythm as the seasoned prison veteran.
  38. Ramsey is just right for the role and Goldberg is equally good. Several other characters have promise. Even with all that second-hand smoke, Hindsight should show us a good time.
  39. The new guest cast is uniformly solid....The whole show is now on its own for the first time, since the previous two seasons were adapted from an Israeli series. That series ran for only two years, so this new In Treatment will have to work from scratch. What it has scratched out so far is impressive.
  40. Rescuing people from burning buildings. Feeding people who are starving. Taking a child no one cared about and teaching that child to read. That’s heroic. The Hero is an entertaining reality show. That’s fine. It’s just not the same thing.
  41. It all adds up to a promising, surprisingly lively and fast-paced drama that humanizes those early computer geeks.
  42. This isn't a portrait of a perfect response. But it leaves no doubt about the magnitude of the moment and the size of the challenge America and its President would soon tackle, and overcome.
  43. Like all good sitcom characters, they sometimes drive us nuts. But we fall for them both and would like very much for this long shot to come in.
  44. Once you get past its curiously unhelpful title, this six-part series offers a powerful look at the rise of women over the last half century, in fields from comedy to politics.
  45. It’s all very evocative, creating a perfect mood for the complete “Basement Tapes” sessions that, surprise surprise, have just been released.
  46. It works as light summer drama, with lots of great banter between the women, and it works as cop drama, since it has put both of them in very dangerous situations at regular intervals. Best of all, though, it keeps peeling away layers on both characters.
  47. It's a big cast where every piece fits, and at least upfront, the writing and jokes are good enough that Anger Management only uses sex gags where they work, not to cover up any lack of other ideas.
  48. PBS goes deeper than Smithsonian [The Day the Bomb Dropped], partly because it’s a two-hour show, but also because it raises the thorny isue of whether that first bomb needed to be dropped at all.
  49. Sleepless in America plays like a meticulously researched horror documentary.
  50. It's hard to classify Grace and Frankie except to say it’s splendid television.
  51. Treme, created by "Wire" mastermind David Simon, may not ultimately get to the level of those others, because it's going to take a while to sort out the characters and lay down the themes. It also looks to have a deliberate pace, and it doesn't seem to be setting up for a lot of blood-and-guts action, so it may end up attracting a more cerebral crowd.
  52. Much of the film is built on interviews with firefighters, and the conversations feel like conversation between professionals, not like a lecture to a group of outsiders.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The movie deals with Lisa’s death tastefully and sincerely, and the three actresses who play the girls couldn’t be better. They have the trio’s finger-snapping repartee and sisterly rapport down. If the script clunks, and the direction of Charles Stone III lacks the slightest in subtlety or grace, those qualities aren’t what matters. The cray-cray back story is.
  53. Unlike shows that rely on flamboyant judges for much of their color, Top Chef has mostly risen and fallen on the personality and skills of the contestants. So it's off to a good start this time around.
  54. The likable Pete and Myka are a classic match, bickering until they need to stop and work together, which they do. Artie provides both comic relief and a reminder that their job is difficult and dangerous--point also made by Artie's boss, Mrs. Frederic (CCH Pounder). Not too much new here. But there's nothing wrong with taking the old and doing it well.
  55. Life is annoying Nucky Thompson as Boardwalk Empire starts its third season, and that gives this first-rate show just the push-off it needs.
  56. The Killing marks another bull's-eye for AMC in presenting complex, literate, well-crafted television.
  57. [A] delightful animated hour.
  58. At the end of each episode, you want to see what will happen in the next one. For a murder mystery, that’s a pretty good start.
  59. Human Target was a good wise-guy action adventure last season. It's already looking like a better one this season. The main reason: Two girls, Indira Varma and Janet Montgomery, have crashed the testosterone party.
  60. It's a show about someone trying to figure out life, one little thing at a time, and realizing that sometimes, hey, you can't.
  61. They also don’t know what’s happening back East, so we don’t start with any crossovers or even cross-references. There’s just the uneasy sense that something is wrong, which for TV drama purposes means something is right.
  62. These four hours pack as much intensity and darkness as 22 episodes of many other police shows.
  63. A look at the first pay cable episode of the iconic kids show reveals that it offers the same mix of fun, education and goofiness that has kept Sesame Street a powerhouse piece of programming for 46 years.
  64. Top of the Lake doesn’t fully get rolling for a while. Happily, Moss doesn’t let us become disinterested.
  65. It understands that high school drama can be as serious as it absurd, and as Jenna and her friends enter their junior year, we can see them slowly starting to wrestle with the real and scary question of where it all goes from here.
  66. Sewell radiates the kind of fascination you can't buy off the rack at the TV drama store, and that alone gives Eleventh Hour a strong start.
  67. Book of Negroes, a six-hour Black History Month miniseries, will be fairly compared to "Roots."
  68. It helps a lot that [Blunt] is played by Patrick Stewart, who brings theatrical majesty to a man who quite sincerely believes words can change the world for the better.
  69. Method to the Madness leaves no doubt, in any case, about the appreciation he has inspired in others over the years, and not just the French.
  70. Writer/director Hugo Blick skillfully walks the hairline between a well-paced adventure thriller and a psychological study that gives us enough time to appreciate the nuances of the character we're watching.
  71. Season four continues the good work of past seasons by building on all the trouble Jackie has heaped upon herself.
  72. [Genealogy] may not seem like a particularly robust thread for an eight-part series, but O’Dowd, Guest and a wonderful cast of deadpan actors and improv experts spin it into a tapestry of cheery laughter.
  73. All the cast seems to be enjoying these turns, because it's a show that cherishes the idea of going over the top.
  74. Beyond the joke, the show’s premise is encouraging: that being gay is no big deal.... The engine driving this show is female friendship, the kind strong enough to get you through even high school. For Amy and Karma, we want that.
  75. Fascinating film details history of American unit whose sole objective was to fool Hitler and Nazis by creating fake armies.
  76. Complications offers a fine ride.
  77. Harper's Island is an elaborate horror movie, a twentysomething slasher flick with a really good wardrobe, a first-rate cast and 13 weeks worth of twists and subplots.
  78. The game has always been better and more joyous than many of the people who played it. "The Tenth Inning," like its predecessor, makes that point as cleanly as a line-drive single to left-center.
  79. This year Dwight has pretty much buried the impersonator tag, though he still has Elvis posters on his wall, and Memphis Beat has further solidified its standing as one of cable's more engaging police dramas.
  80. One of the new season's potentially best sitcoms is born.
  81. It sounds soapy, but it's all handled well enough, and with enough humor, that we believe it.
  82. Survivor’s Remorse becomes simultaneously more uncomfortable and funnier as it launches its second season Saturday. Both those qualities are good.
  83. A relationship with Julie, which has been percolating for some time, might be just a good cover for Dexter. But it feels more complicated than that, which at the very least reflects good writing and acting.
  84. It all adds up to a dizzying series of cross-plots and so many brief and often odd alliances that some viewers may wonder if they've wandered into "Survivor." On the positive side, it's all done with standard Glee fun, the tongue never far from the cheek, and it's punctuated with upbeat musical numbers.
  85. Happily, Harrelson and McConaughey play the characters well enough, and the script is crafted ingeniously enough, that we want to know where it all goes next--and don't focus on the likelihood it will be no place good.
  86. Orange has graphic scenes that aren’t for kids. But they aren’t played for cheap gags, either, and that attitude serves the production well. With Schilling in top form, this Orange tastes fresh.
  87. Like the Oscars themselves at their best, it’s a celebration of the movies.
  88. It’s absurd. It’s ridiculous. If you’re a fan of low-budget horror movies and you miss it, you will regret it for the rest of your life.
  89. Some viewers won't buy the premise of the Social Security numbers. Its beauty, though, is that you don't have to.
  90. There’s little action in Dates. It’s about language, verbal and nonverbal. When the words are this good, that’s enough.
  91. They’re wry and smart about each other and sometimes themselves. Everything also comes out funnier because it’s refreshingly underplayed.
  92. Painful as that journey may be, the show and these actors hit all the notes that make us want to come along.
  93. Spy dramas sometimes get too enamored of their own twists, subplots and dark details, but this one never becomes impenetrable.
  94. The trump card of Hollow Crown, of course, is that it was written by Shakespeare--and if the language sounds stilted to modern ears, anyone who listens for more than a few minutes will be properly seduced.
  95. Much of A to Z deals in a different kind of action than most recent sitcoms about young singles, where the only goal often seems to be setting up predictable sex jokes. Because of that, A to Z may seem a little less frenetic. In truth, that’s good.
  96. The episode moves along at a good pace, with only a couple of moments when the timing feels a little too coincidental.
  97. The songs aren’t all terrific, but like “Rescue Me” at its best, S&D&R&R succeeds both as wild, uncontrolled, absurdist comedy and touching, quiet personal drama.
  98. The Dust Bowl sounds like a dry subject, no cheap pun intended, and Burns works hard to humanize it by talking with some of the now-elderly people who made it through.
  99. It all adds up to plenty of action and suspense, with heroes we like and villains we can boo and hiss. And the fate of the planet at stake. Who says there ain't no cure for the summertime TV blues?

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