New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,397 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 My Name Is Earl: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Cougar: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 578
  2. Negative: 0 out of 578
578 tv reviews
  1. After you watch Wednesday night's premiere of ABC's doctor drama Off the Map, you might think the title means the show hasn't quite found its path yet. You'd be right. But it's got a shot to get there, with an engaging ensemble cast and a novel premise that could prove useful.
  2. In contrast to Scorsese's other work, like his Bob Dylan documentary and "The Last Waltz," George Harrison feels like it doesn't get far below the surface.
  3. While viewers may be curious to know whether they do, the journey itself may not be as interesting to us as it is to #1096’s progeny.
  4. It’s a show rife with bad decisions, though only people who can take several steps back are likely to find the humor. The characters themselves rarely run into much occasion for merriment.
  5. Gossip Girl will get some slack on repeating itself, because teenagers have an incredibly high tolerance for remixing, reworking and rehashing the drama in their own lives. But the show still has to feel fresh, which is why Monday's episode adds at least two new characters who promise to have significant impact on people we already know.
  6. The pieces are in place for a solid drama-with-humor, the kind that cable channels are serving like aspirin these days. The problem is this show hasn't quite figured out yet how to integrate all the components into a uniform tone and direction.
  7. While the program as a whole has room to grow, Wilmore's comedy is sharp, solid and filled with keen observations and strong enough to have earned him the distinction of being the only high-profile black voice in late night television.
  8. So while the scripts and characters rival those of any network series (and beat most), and directors such as Clark Johnson (who played Lewis on "Homicide: Life on the Street") do them justice, the players surrounding Chiklis and Pounder are a notch or two less intense and effective. [12 Mar 2002, p.83]
    • New York Daily News
  9. Once we know the setup, at home and in the workplace, we can pretty much figure what we're about to see and hear. That doesn't make the show less amusing or Cristela herself less appealing. It does mean that once it has found its pocket, at least in the beginning, it seems content to work inside it.
  10. The show raises questions, and fans of the paranormal will find they're kept open in reasonably interesting ways. The problem is that time-travel shows require a level of attention casual TV viewers don't always want to invest.
  11. By staking turf between "True Blood" and "Twilight," Vampire Diaries hopes it has found the promised land. The danger is it could also be no man's land.
  12. Santos very nicely balances her conflicting roles as the kid who wants to experience life and the teenager who finds she has become the mother. We’re rooting for her, the same way we root for the teens in other MTV dramas. The network does this stuff well.
  13. Fans of the comic book and first-rate psycho-horror may form a large enough audience to make this a hit. Those not in those groups may want to start by taking a deep breath.
  14. What we have here is a classic family sitcom, with jokes that come from the quirks of the characters rather than a mandate that there be a sex line every 30 seconds.
  15. The dialogue is crisp, no scene lasts too long, and despite the large cast, we can follow what's happening. What's not clear yet is whether this show has its own style and vision.
  16. It all adds up to an hour of decent entertainment, and there's room for enough character development to give NCIS: Los Angeles a personality of its own.
  17. Viewers who were glued to the trial may note a misplaced detail here and there, but in general they are likely to find this 87-minute movie a solid summation of Arias’ disintegration.
  18. While Family has predictable moments, it has the potential to provide some pleasant surprises.
  19. Poehler has great skill at delivering outrageous lines in a droll deadpan. That sets the tone for a cast, including Lowe and Scott, with similar abilities. Too many of the sketches, though, cross that fine but visible line between bemused absurdity and slapstick.
  20. It's still lively, still fun and still has the right touch of snap in the dialogue. But at times it's working a little too hard, and maybe requiring the viewer to work too hard as well.
  21. The Michael J. Fox Show, which marks his welcome return to a regular network series, isn’t an instant classic. But it does a lot of things right.
  22. It makes for lively drama, and, given what was at stake for religion and royalty, its historical significance remains legitimate. It just gets hard to watch sometimes, because even though most drama is fueled by its villains, The Tudors needs a few more characters we could actually like.
  23. A few horror-story cliches seep in, but with Bello playing a character who is strikingly unglamorous and at times not even sympathetic, Big Driver should deliver for its audience.
  24. Once TNT's new Leverage scrambles to its feet, it becomes an adept, fast-moving adventure yarn built on the familiar but serviceable premise that justice sometimes isn't best served through legitimate channels.
  25. Nip/Tuck may sag a little here and there, but for what it is - a goof on medical shows--its scalpel still has an edge.
  26. The Crazy Ones has its charms. It also has yet to find the balance between Williams’s shtick--his solos, basically--and the good ensemble comedy that would keep viewers coming back.
  27. As they build the show’s foundation, dozens of other characters float by. Figuring out which ones matter, and why, will be part of the fun and the challenge in this compact series.
  28. It makes for an intense two hours.
  29. Creator/writer/director Neil LaBute uses a theatrical style, heavy on dialogue. That works out well both for developing the characters and putting comedy into the situation.
  30. The cop is a little too snarky, the nurse is a little too cavalier and the 16-year-old doesn't look a day under 21. That said, A&E's new Florida police drama, The Glades, still has some juice.

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