New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,460 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Empire (2015): Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Workaholics: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. The best thing to say about "The Class" is that it improves by quite a few notches as it goes along.... The worst thing to say about "The Class" is that requiring viewers to come back and try, try again is asking a lot.
  2. Black Scorpion is good bad - fun to watch as a tacky diversion. [5 Jan 2001, p.109]
    • New York Daily News
  3. In the end, while its outrageous characters are often amusing, their palate of jokes runs thin.
  4. It feels painted by the numbers.
  5. It presents a mouthwatering cast and a tasty premise, then fails to generate a succulent premiere.
  6. The comedy dominates so much that the forcefully dramatic situations - when O'Toole's character explodes with a verbal or physical outburst, for example, or when they're put in physical jeopardy - seem woefully out of place, almost like spoofs. And even those don't seem to be taken seriously by the characters, so why should viewers react any differently? [26 Jul 2000]
    • New York Daily News
  7. By looking less repugnant than the others, it comes off looking almost attractive. [30 Jun 2003]
    • New York Daily News
  8. The cast works well together. They just have to fight some implausible setups and jarring shifts from clever and poignant to sappy and slapstick. ... Even assuming the show can keep the cast sick enough to be in the hospital, but so not sick it just gets sad, it may be hard to sustain this story over a full season.
  9. The "Apprentice" vision of "reality" is pretty much summarized by the fact that somehow all the women are slender and attractive. [8 Jan 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  10. Eli Stone is uneven and seems uncertain about what it wants to be when it grows up, it has rather endearing moments.
  11. Sheen has no problem grounding the show, and encouraging viewers to laugh at his character. It's Cryer, though, who brings the more delightful offbeat energy to Two and a Half Men. When complaining about his wife's change of heart, he seems genuinely anxious and betrayed - but always manages to inject a flustered comic edge that makes the pain amusing, as well as real. [22 Sept 2003, p.77]
    • New York Daily News
  12. "The Unit" features a strong cast - but for much of this show, they're cast adrift.
  13. Fox and K-Ville creator Jonathan Lisco get credit for setting their new police drama in post-Katrina New Orleans--but future episodes will have to settle down and get serious if the show is to do justice to its setting and potential.
  14. For a serialized drama to catch on, though, it has to grab you from the start. Despite its impressive roster of actors, "Smith" doesn't.
  15. The change of format doesn't bring with it any sense of assurance. To amp up the canned laughter while simultaneously lowering the intelligence level of the humor isn't a recipe for success. [14 Apr 2003]
    • New York Daily News
  16. "Dresden" hasn't put a spell on me at the start - but it's not bad. It's just that on Sundays, opposite such shows as "Desperate Housewives" and "Rome," not bad is not nearly good enough.
  17. There's a good cast at work here - but after previewing two episodes, "Medium" seems anything but well-done. [3 Jan 2005]
    • New York Daily News
  18. Tucker, whatever its modest comedic achievements, feels like a retread.
  19. So many parts of the pilot, though, seem dumbed down or sacrificing character for punch lines, you wonder why things weren't retooled in time for launch.
  20. No matter how obvious the wardrobe might be, the scripts are even more so.
  21. Complexity is one thing; making the complexity compelling is another, and "Prison Break" fails there.
  22. Lipstick Jungle apparently still isn't sure we get the point about bonding, because it goes out of its way to make it clear that even sympathetic male characters don't.
  23. Jay was Jay last night--hands in pockets, blue suit, solid monologue. Pleasant, likeable, funny, a guy you'd invite to your barbeque.
  24. It requires a lot of patience to get there, but the lessons may be worth it.
  25. There's nothing flashy or special about this series, but it's satisfying and impressive in an old-fashioned way - much more so, in this opener, than its parent, "JAG." A lot of it is due to the ease with which Harmon and McCallum embody their characters. [23 Sept 2003, p.83]
    • New York Daily News
  26. All glamour and glitz and surface. The show is intended as a prime-time soap to appeal to those who watched "Beverly Hills, 90210," "Dawson's Creek" and "Felicity" - and for them, The O.C. ought to connect quickly. [5 Aug 2003, p.66]
    • New York Daily News
  27. Anyone who thinks Silverstone's charm wasn't the major factor in the movie has only to watch the TV version. With Blanchard at the center, Clueless doesn't have the same flair and in this appearance-is-everything Beverly Hills comedy, flair is everything.
  28. Nip/Tuck does not grab you like "The Shield," though, and does not ingratiate you to its quirky tone, like the network's comedy "Lucky." It's more artifice than art, and in everything from the performances to the dramatic contrivances, you can see the strain.
  29. "'Til Death" plays like a tired reworking of "Married ... With Children," but without the children.
  30. With talents like Dunham (who created the show, writes, directs and stars) and executive producer Judd Apatow behind the scenes, you’d expect at least more chuckles than you get from this sad return.

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