New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 1,830 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Late Marriage
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
1,830 movie reviews
  1. As a go-for-it music movie, Whiplash is just about peerless. The fear is contagious, but so is the jazz vibe: When Andrew snatches up his sticks and the band launches into a standard—say, Hank Levy’s “Whiplash”—it’s hard not to smile, judder, and sway.
  2. Beyond the Lights is a deft, gorgeous movie. For all its honesty, it’s never slow, and for all its criticism of the music industry, it’s never finger-wagging.
  3. A truly strange, wondrous beast. It has the playful humor and charm of a children’s movie, but its design is dark and unsettling.
  4. This is Kent’s first feature — an astonishing debut. Not perfect, though.
  5. If Penn really lets these actors sing, his watchful camera also knows how to respect their silences.
  6. Unsatisfying at a very high level. It fritters away more than most movies ever offer up.
  7. There's a timelessness, an immanence to what she (Varda) shows us.
  8. What she (Ullmann) does achieve is a couple of scenes of lacerating power.
  9. The Korean director im Kwon-Taek has made more than 90 films since his first in 1962, and perhaps this explains why his latest, Chunhyang, seems so effortless and masterly. Based on a highly popular eighteenth-century Korean folktale, it's a movie that, stylistically, mixes the traditional with the avant-garde; the narrative may be ritualistic, but there's a let's-try-it-on-for-size friskiness to the filmmaking.
  10. The first full-scale documentary about the history of those years, and it lays out lucidly the involvement of the Communist Party in the young men's defense and the ways in which the trials, against the backdrop of the Depression, replayed the murderous quarrels of the Civil War all over again.
  11. Terence Davies's The House of Mirth is a rigorously elegant adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel, and unlike in some other Davies movies, the rigor here doesn't turn into rigor mortis.... This is dourness of a degree you won't find in Wharton, but in its own shadowed terms the film is a triumph.
  12. It's worth seeing, though, not only for its occasional moments of breathtaking beauty and sadness but also because its very rarity demands it.
  13. The film starts out as a freewheeling farce and turns into a pitch-black burlesque with surprising depths of feeling.
  14. Has a poignant undertone: We may feel we already know in our bones just how suffocating this culture is; but the people who made this movie seem to be discovering each fresh horror for the first time. It's like watching a virgin sacrifice.
  15. There's a new sensibility at work here, wry yet lushly disaffected, and it will be worth watching what Martel does next.
  16. By the end of the movie, the characters are numbed, while the audience is sensitized to the mayhem to an almost unbearable degree.
  17. This time around, though, the Coens' usual arch deliberateness isn't quite as deliberate, and there's an appealing shagginess to some of the episodes and performances.... This is the Coen brothers' most emotionally felt movie, and that's not meant as faint praise.
  18. It's a frisky, funny roundelay starring Stefania Sandrelli, and it features enough shouting and arm-waving to power a windmill.
  19. At times it's plodding and inchoate, but there's certainly nothing else like it in the movies right now, and it has at least one great sequence.
  20. The dramatic arc of Roger Dodger may be banal, but Kidd manages some marvelous moments.
  21. Connery and Zeta-Jones not only look great together, they work well together.
  22. When it comes time for some of the girls to flee, the result is one of the most emotionally satisfying of all prison breaks.
  23. Refreshingly uncategorizable: It’s somewhere between a marital-discord drama and a mystery thriller, but it also has its madcap moments.
  24. Much more kid-oriented than any other computer-animated movie thus far. In other words, it's much more Disneyish. I enjoyed it.
  25. Harrowingly straightforward.
  26. Barrymore pulls off the neatest trick of the year: She makes all this pop schlock matter.
  27. This is not just a musicologist's dream; it's our dream, too.
  28. Bob is a marvelous creation--a faker who is also the genuine article. He’s the perfect hero for a movie about the world as one big scam.
  29. A hushed and powerful piece.
  30. It’s a hyper-aestheticized meditation on the meaning of history, visually astonishing, dramatically stilted. No masterpiece, but quite a feat (and quite effete).

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