New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 2,242 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The LEGO Movie
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede (First Sequence)
Score distribution:
2242 movie reviews
  1. His (Sidney Lumet) touch in Before the Devil is so sure, so perfectly weighted, that it’s hard to imagine him capable of making a bad movie. The thing is just enthralling.
  2. Now, at last, comes a fun dystopian sci-fi epic — a splattery shambles with a fat dose of social satire and barely a lick of sense. It’s Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer, which must be seen to be disbelieved.
  3. Leigh has been giving actors their tongues for decades, and of all his films, Happy-Go-Lucky is the easiest, the least labored.
  4. The Pinochet Case is a searing album of remembrance from those who, having survived, suffered most.
  5. Beautifully directed by Phillip Noyce, the film -- is a full experience, a love story and a murder mystery that expands into a meditation on the deep deceptions of innocence.
  6. Weiner is a tabula rasa documentary — one of the most provocative of its kind I’ve seen.
  7. Despite its downbeat context (a plague at its height), the movie is a crowd-­pleaser — graceful and funny enough to distract you from its gaps and elisions.
  8. In the end, the movie is more than the sum of its fragments. The montages are intense, the images ravishing. The movie is tactile. When you finally feel this place, you understand just how little you understand.
  9. The end of The Cove is as rousing as anything from Hollywood. Manipulative? Sure--but isn't that fitting? Capitalism has driven an entire village to massacre dolphins and keep its work hidden.
  10. That's a knock on ­Bujalski -- that his characters exist in a vacuum, with few references to popular culture or politics or much of anything, really. Of course, one artist's vacuum is another's poetic distillation, and there's something about Mutual Appreciation (which is shot in an unassuming black and white) that spoke more directly to my inner slacker than any film since, well, "Funny Ha Ha."
  11. This amazing, maddening film presents a series of extended, mostly static, terrifying tableaux of despair, poverty, and decay.
  12. Moodysson captures exactly the preening narcissism and gumption of these frazzled would-be revolutionaries trying to wriggle out of their bourgeois straitjackets.
  13. Has a mixture of bloodletting and exultation that would make Sam Peckinpah sit up in his grave and howl with pleasure.
  14. If you’ve seen Linklater’s other films, you know that time for him isn’t just a factor, it’s a character, a player.
  15. Spellbindingly original -- Like the wild orchid, Adaptation is a marvel of adaptation, entwined with its hothouse environment and yet stunningly unique.
  16. Pantheism, Cameronism: In Avatar, what's the diff? Now he's king of a world he made from scratch.
  17. The Forbidden Room is often maddening, occasionally beautiful, and ultimately unforgettable.
  18. Endlessly enchanting.
  19. It all adds up to a searing portrait of social misery.
  20. There's a timelessness, an immanence to what she (Varda) shows us.
  21. It's a truly prodigious piece of work, resembling a career summation far more than a maiden voyage.
  22. Rarely has there been so obscenely precise a depiction of ravaged innocence. This young girl has nothing to live for--and an entire life ahead of her in which to live it.
  23. It’s a fascinating meeting of three minds, and perspectives. Chief among them is Salgado himself.
  24. Bahrani’s concentration is close to supernatural as he tracks the young, prepubescent Ale (Alejandro Polanco) from job to soul-numbing job, some legal, some extralegal, to the point where you’re forced to suspend altogether your moral judgments and watch with a mixture of pain and awe.
  25. A comedy in the best sense--it draws its life from the pitch-perfect authenticity of its characters.
  26. '71
    Whenever the film focuses on Gary, it’s O’Connell’s show. And the actor’s ability to quietly express a whole range of emotions with his body language and his eyes, is staggering — especially since, for much of the film, he’s limping and covered in blood.
  27. It’s true that the number of whales in captivity isn’t huge. But they’ve now become the mightiest symbols of our cultural hubris — of our inability to manage creatures we have the power to capture and imprison. It’s a metaphor for the ages.
  28. To my taste, the movie finally feels rather one-dimensional, basic. But there’s no disputing its awful power.
  29. You get a bad feeling early in Project Nim, the brilliant, traumatizing documentary by James Marsh (Man on Wire).
  30. It’s romantic, tragic, and inexorably strange.

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