New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,902 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 City of God
Lowest review score: 0 Noel
Score distribution:
6,902 movie reviews
  1. Ron Howard's splendid The Da Vinci Code is the Holy Grail of summer blockbusters: a crackling, fast-moving thriller that's every bit as brainy and irresistible as Dan Brown's controversial bestseller.
  2. I can't wait to see Borat, which has twice as many laughs as all of this year's other movie comedies combined, for a fourth time.
  3. Happy Feet is not only the year's best animated movie, it's one of the year's best movies, period. Go.
  4. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  5. All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
  6. Four stars simply aren't enough for Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire, which just may be the most entertaining movie I've ever labeled a masterpiece in these pages.
  7. May not have the starry casts of the Coens' more recent films, but it has plenty of heart and soul.
  8. You have never seen a movie like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon because there has never been a movie like it.
    • New York Post
  9. An absorbing, deeply affecting, well-acted --and remarkably evenhanded -- antiwar statement. It's also incredibly suspenseful and very blackly funny.
  10. It’s that priceless dialogue, the bitter ironies, the magnificently skeevy cast of characters and even the overall structure that make The Seven Five “Goodfellas” in blue.
  11. The moral alertness of the film is of the level normally confined, in military pictures, to talky courtroom scenes, yet Eastwood skillfully works dilemmas into propulsive and suspenseful action.
  12. A hilarious and touching animated masterpiece that takes a gloriously imaginative, sometimes scary leap into the mind of a girl on the cusp of adolescence.
  13. Director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s film combines allegory, brutal melodrama, black humor and strikingly beautiful compositions, each frame dense with meaning. Leviathan stays absolutely gripping, right up to the O. Henry twist that slams the film shut.
  14. A rare case of an American remake that actually improves on a European movie.
  15. Brilliantly acted and directed, Ava DuVernay’s towering Selma is Hollywood’s definitive depiction of the 1960s American civil rights movement — as well as perhaps the most timely movie you’ll see this year.
  16. 24-karat stuff, even if it has a soul of tin. With the voices of Ewan McGregor, Robin Williams and Mel Brooks, Robots is a giddy erector-set update of "Toy Story" with a splash of "The Wizard of Oz."
  17. Russian Dolls is itself a delightful mini-trip to Europe. Its overly cute bits are like cinematic tourist traps, but it's the beauty that stays with you.
  18. This flick is fast and ferocious, his (Sidney Lumet) sharpest and best since "Prince of the City" (1980) - and surely one of the year's finest.
  19. Pure magic.
  20. A sublime variation on the buddy road movie, infusing the midlife crises of the two main protagonists with hope and poetry.
  21. Comes as close to perfect as any movie I've seen lately.
  22. Each scene is breathtaking, such as a long shot of a river at a key moment, and an unforgettable soccer game played with no ball. Timbuktu deserves every accolade it gets.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I was reminded, at times, of the painstakingly detailed beauty of “The Triplets of Belleville,” but Moore has a more ethereal, rounded aesthetic all his own. They don’t make movies like this anymore — except when, lucky us, they do.
  23. Hands-down the best movie of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Go
    Breakneck, raucous and thoroughly exhilarating.
    • New York Post
  24. 56 Up is as good a point as any to get hooked on the magnificent half-century series of documentaries, beginning in 1964 with "7 Up."
  25. So consistently involving because the excellent cast delivers their lines with the kind of utter conviction not seen in this kind of movie since the first "Star Wars."
  26. It's like watching Alfred Hitchcock try to solve a Rubik's cube in a roadside diner.
    • New York Post
  27. Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
  28. Compared by some to “2001: A Space Odyssey,’’ Cuarón’s relatively intimate space epic is equally groundbreaking in the spectacular way it depicts space.

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