New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,379 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 London Has Fallen
Score distribution:
7379 movie reviews
  1. It’s a small movie, but in his third feature, indie writer-director Chad Hartigan proves he is a major talent, imbuing the interactions with wit and warmth and charm.
  2. Cars leaves the animated competition in the dust, even if it is a tad slower and more predictable than Pixar at full throttle.
  3. An exhilarating, sweeping epic that begs to be seen on the largest possible screen.
    • New York Post
  4. This demanding puzzle is not for the "Chocolat" crowd, but those who stay with it will experience perhaps the most dazzling film released so far this year - even though a second viewing is virtually mandatory.
    • New York Post
  5. I'm not generally a huge fan of movies with two-or three-person casts -- they tend to resemble filmed plays -- but The Business of Strangers is a knockout.
  6. An instant classic.
  7. Pieta is one of Kim’s most complex and mature efforts, melding violence and humor into dark entertainment.
  8. Includes insightful and often hilarious archival interviews with Langlois and dozens of associates, as well as wonderful footage of Langlois.
  9. This movie doesn't get huffy, it gets laughs.
  10. It’s a captivating throwback that promises to lead the genre away from sci-fi flash and trickery. I’d rank it beside “X-Men: Days of Future Past” among the best X-Men entries.
  11. The role of William is a perfect fit for Red West, a well-weathered member of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia who has served as a bodyguard as well as a stuntman and bit-part actor.
  12. Rarely less than absorbing and never boring over its nearly three-hour length.
  13. Like some of Hitchcock's films, the story - adapted from a novel by Charlotte Armstrong, an American mystery writer of the '40s and '50s - can be accused of stretching credibility and coincidence almost to the breaking point.
  14. Be warned: Though it's entirely justified by the story, there's a level of violence and brutality in Training Day -- that some terror-weary audience members may not care to cope with these days.
  15. Lilya is portrayed by Oksana Akinshina, who gives a dynamic, heartbreaking performance... She was wonderful in ["Brothers"], but is even more astonishing in Lilya 4-Ever.
  16. Sicario, which combines dizzying action scenes with a taut script, ravishing photography and an otherwordly musical score, is a knockout.
  17. Genuinely creepy Southern Gothic thriller that once again proves that in horror movies, sometimes less is actually more.
  18. The result is an immensely enjoyable portrait of a strange-looking, non-comforming genius who loved women as much as designing masterpieces but was never able to commit to them. In other words: great architect, lousy family man.
  19. Turns out to be one of the most absorbing films of the year. Plus it has lots of wiener jokes.
  20. So terrifically entertaining, it would be a shame if it didn't inspire a companion piece on New York.
  21. This is all as pure and sunny as lemonade.
  22. Pays off with emotional dividends well worth the time investment.
    • New York Post
  23. An unforgettable and complex portrait of a nuclear family in meltdown.
  24. You'll either be screaming with laughter - or be incredibly offended.
  25. The two working girls at the center of Tangerine are played by engaging newcomers: Kitana Kiki Rodriguez as the freshly out-of-jail Sin-Dee Rella, and Mya Taylor as her best friend Alexandra.
  26. A twisty, spectacular farce.
  27. His (Friedkin) very lack of subtlety is both the strength and weakness of The Exorcist in the 21st century.
    • New York Post
  28. An astonishing re-creation of the Londonderry massacre of January 1972.
  29. This environmentally themed, very loose version of Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Mermaid" is never going to be mistaken for Disney's musical of the same name.
  30. If there has ever been a better voice performance in an animated film than Ellen DeGeneres’ in Pixar’s wonderful sequel Finding Dory, I sure can’t think of it. Her tour de force even surpasses Robin Williams in “Aladdin.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    (Osment) delivers what may be the greatest performance ever by a child actor.
  31. Thankfully, Tintin is Spielberg at his most playful and unpretentious.
  32. Toy Story had a simpler, stronger story and the advantage of being the first of its kind. But it's quickly apparent that TS2 represents a major step forward in computer-animation artistry.
  33. Atriumph on almost every level. It is breathtakingly stylish, wonderfully acted and its three interrelated tales of the "war" on drugs are brilliantly structured to form a cohesive, powerful whole.
  34. The cast is excellent, particularly Timur Magomedgadzhiev as a conscience-stricken co-worker, but it’s Cotillard who’s in nearly every scene. Desperate, downtrodden, but grasping at each shred of hope, Cotillard — who won an Oscar playing Edith Piaf in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose” — carries the whole film.
  35. Not that a film as taut and exciting as this one needs punchy dialogue, but Black Sea has that, too.
  36. May not be a masterpiece, but it still had me in tears at the end.
  37. The Wrestler offers something to pretty much everyone in the audience. Much like "The Sopranos," it creates a world that might make you feel utterly at home or exhilarated by strange horrors. Maybe both.
  38. Lymelife, set amid marital decay and teen frustration, isn't quite the "American Beauty" of the 516 area code, but it'll do.
  39. A funny, hip, touching and utterly irresistible comedy-drama.
  40. A deeply felt evocation of a place and a people by writer-director Matt Porterfield, who set this largely improvised film in his own lower-class Baltimore neighborhood.
  41. A real high in a season filled with unfunny comedies.
  42. One of the year's most engaging films.
  43. Mostly it's worth seeing Alien, which established Scott as an A-list director, in a theater because his brilliant and often expansive visuals have always worked better on a big screen than on video.
  44. You know a performance has to be special when a Palestinian wins Israel's version of the Best Actress Oscar. But why should politics detract from a stunning performance?
  45. An exquisitely crafted Civil War epic that combines the epic romantic sweep of "Gone With the Wind" with a more intimate voice that speaks eloquently to the war-weary nation of today.
  46. Ray
    Contains large helpings of Hollywood schmaltz, stereotype and clich‚, but it's also pretty impossible to resist.
  47. Rarely since the tale of the Corleones has a movie presented such a compelling, sympathetic portrait of a criminal lowlife.
    • New York Post
  48. Combining a thoughtful script with splendid acting -- especially by Sansa -- Bellocchio has fashioned a tense thriller that is both understated and powerful.
  49. One funk-tastic musical biopic.
  50. The faint of heart might want to leave early. If you elect to stay, remember: You were warned.
  51. Werner Herzog looks at the death penalty in Into the Abyss, and as is almost always the case, to look through his eyes is to marvel.
  52. Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe and the Marquis de Sade (interesting combination, no?).
  53. Drawing inspiration from anime and vintage Looney Toons, this beautifully drafted, offbeat charmer is hip, funny - and a bona fide heart tugger for the whole family.
  54. The scariest, creepiest and most elegantly filmed horror movie I've seen in years - it positively drives a stake through the competition.
  55. You can tell this is a smart take on Hamlet from the first wordless opening shots.
  56. So smooth and satisfying it makes the similar "Ocean's Eleven" look like a game of three-card monte.
  57. The second half offers shot after shot of the people who sat opposite Abramovi - an unexpectedly enthralling record of reactions that range from stark agony to rather phony amusement.
  58. O
    Exceptionally intelligent and powerful contemporary adaptation.
  59. More than a ripped-from-the- headlines drug drama, Maria Full of Grace is like a horror movie made real.
  60. Constantly battling, Hoskins and Dench have terrific chemistry together.
  61. Don't let the quiet, indie stylings of The Place Beyond the Pines fool you. This is a big movie with a lot on its mind. Slowly, it unfolds into a kind of epic.
  62. Tremendously affecting on several levels, In the Bedroom is must-see viewing for anyone who complains Hollywood doesn't make movies for grownups.
  63. Makes the most of its wintry settings and never insults the audience's intelligence -- no mean feat for a family film. It's a real crowd-pleaser.
  64. Coppola works in weird ways, but the real Versailles was so much weirder.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Polarized world views from the mouths of babes -- unfortunately does little to mitigate this depressing image, but much to humanize both sides.
  65. The most effective moments in Taymor's gorgeous, surprisingly romantic Frida are those that evoke the visual world from which Kahlo's work was formed or the paintings themselves, often using clever animation and other special effects.
  66. There is too much funny here for a movie (even though it continues into the closing credits). Step Brothers should be a TV show.
  67. Easily one of the year's best movies.
  68. Bryan Cranston finally translates his critical acclaim for “Breaking Bad” into an Oscar-caliber performance in darkly comic Trumbo, playing an eloquent, witty screenwriter who bucked the Hollywood blacklist and triumphed.
  69. A modest and charming comedy from Israel.
  70. The final result, shaped by the brilliantly nimble, pitch-perfect direction of Spike Jonze, and blessed by superb acting, is an extraordinarily clever comedy that falters only in the last 20 minutes.
  71. '71
    It’s a rare film that locates viciousness and kindness on both sides of Northern Ireland’s Troubles.
  72. The skillfully acted and directed The Lives of Others is a timely warning about governments that seek to repress dissent.
  73. You're either going to love this film and run out to see everything Majewski has directed, or you're going to be bored silly. I'm hoping for the former.
  74. Worth seeing just for the dramatization of the making of “Good Vibrations” alone. But there’s much more to savor in this biopic — a rare high note in the drone of so much summer dreck.
  75. For all of its laughs and a star-making performance by Hawkins, Happy-Go-Lucky represents a serious philosophical inquiry by Leigh, who has illustrated a consistently pessimistic view of humankind in his semi-improvised movies.
  76. This movie depicts an unlikely intersection of sports and leadership in ways that manage to be inspiring and insightful without ever becoming schmaltzy or preachy.
  77. File this one in the same category of edgy Long Island comedies as the equally smart 2009 Alec Baldwin film "Lymelife."
  78. Vulgar and lewd and raunchy like you wouldn't believe, and absolutely hilarious from beginning to end.
    • New York Post
  79. The story is ornate but easy to follow. It's the dreamy look and sound of Tabu - half old, half modern - that give the film its haunting strangeness.
  80. The Yellow Handkerchief tells a timeless fable, and tells it extremely well.
  81. The movie all but proclaims U2 the world's best rock band. Somewhere, Mick Jagger's jaws are grinding.
  82. Woody Allen's most purely entertaining film in years.
  83. The marvelous Burtonic gothic/nightmare production design -- scenery, weaponry, costumes, etc. constantly pleases the eye without ever distracting you from the plot.
  84. Doesn't have the crossover appeal of the Mexican sexcapade "Y Tu Mama Tambien," but it does herald the arrival of an audacious young filmmaker. We can't wait to see what he does next.
  85. Ivo’s farmhouse looks leftover from another century, which gives a timeless feeling, as does the regal bearing of Ulfsak and the dry humor of the script. The film telegraphs its pacifist message early on, but it’s still deeply affecting.
  86. A visually stunning film.
  87. There is something both mischievous and moving about a world-famous director who, closing on his 10th decade, designs a movie that celebrates his actors: their varying ages, their versatility, their heart.
  88. The friction between a couple of still-struggling artists sounds rather depressing, but in fact the film is often funny; it shows that love is present in even the couple’s harshest exchanges.
  89. The film is dark, both literally and figuratively. Only at the very end do we get a glimpse of the sun.
  90. A classic social drama in the proud tradition of "Norma Rae," "Silkwood" and "Erin Brockovich."
  91. Fast-moving, psychologically savvy.
  92. Like a Pixar movie shorn of the cutesy and manipulative aspects that marred “Inside Out,” the animated remake of The Little Prince, hitting theaters and Netflix, is as fragile and beautiful as the beloved rose guarded by the wee fellow of the title.
  93. Actors tell us that dying is easy, comedy is hard. But comedies about dying are hardest of all.
  94. It's also a terrific, career-capping role for Eastwood, who claims he's now retired as an actor. He shows off his comic chops more fully than in any film since "Bronco Billy" more than a quarter-century ago.
  95. If Like Someone in Love frustrates, it also has ineffable grace in the framing of Kiarostami’s long, languid shots, the changes he captures in the light, and the way the actors’ smallest movements become fascinating. This enigmatic study of identities built on social deceit offers more than easy answers ever could.
  96. Brutality and tenderness are a potent mix in War Witch.
  97. Spanish master filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar offers up a grisly Halloween trick-and-treat in his first full-out horror movie, an eye-popping and genuinely shocking gender-bending twist on Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo.''
  98. Literate and engrossing, with excellent performances.

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