New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,604 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 In the Mood for Love
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
6,604 movie reviews
  1. As we face yet another summer of brooding superheroes, it's Magic Mike to the rescue! He's got the civilian alter ego and the acrobatic skills to rival Spidey or Batman.
  2. The best reason to wade into this (let's be honest) challenging but hugely rewarding film is Quvenzhané Wallis.
  3. Christopher Nolan's dramatically and emotionally satisfying wrap-up to the Dark Knight trilogy adroitly avoids clichés and gleefully subverts your expectations at every turn.
  4. The actors in Compliance perform with thorough and chilling sincerity.
  5. A blue-chip Oscar contender that's also a rousing popcorn movie, Ben Affleck's Argo offers plenty of nail-biting thrills as well as funnier scenes than you'd ever imagine possible in the grim context of the Iran hostage crisis.
  6. The very sex-positive The Sessions treats intimacy with an explicitness and honesty that's very rare in movies. It may be the first film that doesn't turn premature ejaculation into a punch line.
  7. Like the fictional Clarice Starling in "The Silence of the Lambs,'' Maya is a consummate professional who brilliantly performs her job in an often hostile work environment.
  8. All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
  9. Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
  10. 56 Up is as good a point as any to get hooked on the magnificent half-century series of documentaries, beginning in 1964 with "7 Up."
  11. Such is literature’s power that the cast is more at ease portraying ancient Romans than speaking as versions of themselves.
  12. Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves is the purest, boldest re-imagining of silent cinema yet.
  13. Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
  14. Without any preachiness, this magically beautiful film urges us to take better care of the bees, and honor the irreplaceable things that they do for us.
  15. A Hijacking is Lindholm’s second feature as director; he’s also worked with such austere Danes as Thomas Vinterberg of Dogme 95 fame. What he’s learned, it seems, is how to strip away distractions, and let character become suspense, as well as destiny.
  16. There’s no shortage of brains, brawn, eye candy, wit and even some poetry in this epic battle between massive lizard-like monsters and 25-story-high robots operated by humans.
  17. The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
  18. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  19. It falls to Hanks and his movie-star presence to anchor this ambitious enterprise, and he does some of his most impressive acting without saying a word.
  20. Compared by some to “2001: A Space Odyssey,’’ Cuarón’s relatively intimate space epic is equally groundbreaking in the spectacular way it depicts space.
  21. Well-meaning films like “Lincoln’’ and “Lee Daniels’ The Butler’’ merely scratch the surface compared to the deep and painful truths laid bare by 12 Years a Slave. It’s about time, Scarlett O’Hara.
  22. This Belgian drama is the real deal, an alternately wrenching and ecstatic viewing experience, adapted from a play by lead actor Johan Heldenbergh.
  23. Miyazaki offers a vivid, at times fantastical view of Japan between the wars, wracked by the Great Depression, a fearsome earthquake that leveled Tokyo in 1923, a tuberculosis epidemic and the rise of fascism.
  24. No film I’ve seen so far this year has provided the sheer moviegoing pleasure of We Are the Best!
  25. Twice I have left a Calvary screening feeling dazed and moved.
  26. That the story has largely gone untold is a shame, and Kennedy (daughter of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy) has done a service to the country in reminding us.
  27. Take note, Lars von Trier: This is how you do a truly funny, subversive movie about a woman’s obsession with the human body and sex.
  28. Powerful, provocative and often surprisingly funny, this may be the year's outstanding documentary.
  29. This wonderful party of a movie, as totally original as its hero, stamps on a smiley face that will linger for hours.
  30. Not a film for all tastes, but it's a considerable artistic achievement.

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