New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,412 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The King's Speech
Lowest review score: 0 Marci X
Score distribution:
7412 movie reviews
  1. Daring and unique, La Commune makes perfect viewing for the Fourth of July, which commemorates America's own revolution.
  2. Summer hasn't even started, but you won't likely find a better catch this season than Finding Nemo, a dazzling, computer-animated fish tale with a funny, touching script and wonderful voice performances that make it an unqualified treat for all ages.
  3. Revels in the sensual pleasure of music while capturing brilliantly the tension that grips any theater company before the curtain goes up.
  4. Being John Malkovich, which contains not a frame of extraneous footage, is more than a must-see movie: It's a must-see-more-than-once event.
    • New York Post
  5. Chance encounters and fated love are the stuff of fairy tales, which is what makes the deliriously romantic sequel Before Sunset a small miracle.
  6. A spectacularly rendered tale of a family of superheroes, takes the art form to a whole new level.
  7. An unqualified triumph, the year's best movie so far.
    • New York Post
  8. Davis, a hugely underrated actress..., is deadpan perfection as Joyce, wearing oversized glasses and a wig that makes her look like an older version of Thora Birch's character in "Ghost World."
  9. It ranks among Robert Altman's best work ever, and that its many satisfactions derive in large part from a superbly written screenplay by Julian Fellowes that has no equal this year.
  10. It's a long, brutal and honest look at a shattering event some Americans would apparently prefer not to see depicted - but also a respectful, inspiring one that's in no way exploitative or emotionally manipulative.
  11. This spectacularly great reboot is surprisingly owned not by Hardy, who is fine, but by Charlize Theron.
  12. An unforgettable and complex portrait of a nuclear family in meltdown.
  13. There is an honesty and realism to Driver’s performances that work well in the part of a blue-collar poet who feels no need to court the spotlight.
  14. It is a vivid, at times heartbreaking, portrait of a life and a nation in crisis.
  15. The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
  16. It's impossible to conceive of this ruefully funny entertainment without Bill Murray, who is nothing less than brilliant.
  17. All the pieces converge in a powerful rush during the second half.
  18. The skillfully acted and directed The Lives of Others is a timely warning about governments that seek to repress dissent.
  19. The movie equivalent of a 12-course feast crammed with unforgettable images and mind-boggling stunts.
  20. Engrossing and exhilarating documentary.
  21. Koreeda, talented director that he is, never allows the story to sink into soap-opera melodrama, and he refrains from pointing fingers.
  22. I can't wait to see Borat, which has twice as many laughs as all of this year's other movie comedies combined, for a fourth time.
  23. Yet while Nemes criticized “Schindler’s List” as “conventional,” all that’s new here is the hyper-realistic technique: Saul’s quest is not very far from the girl in the red dress.
  24. The cast is excellent, particularly Timur Magomedgadzhiev as a conscience-stricken co-worker, but it’s Cotillard who’s in nearly every scene. Desperate, downtrodden, but grasping at each shred of hope, Cotillard — who won an Oscar playing Edith Piaf in 2007’s “La Vie en Rose” — carries the whole film.
  25. Less tiring than a three-hour tramp through the halls, and considerably less expensive than a plane ticket, National Gallery gives the feeling of having seen everything there is to see.
  26. Some documentaries are a fervent search for truth; others are a fervent search for snickers. This one is the latter, providing via interviews and old film clips a Greatest Hits for Bush haters.
  27. More than a thriller, Phoenix is a ghost story, made plain in an extraordinary shot of Nelly’s terror at a passing train.
  28. The role of William is a perfect fit for Red West, a well-weathered member of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia who has served as a bodyguard as well as a stuntman and bit-part actor.
  29. Brilliantly acted and directed, Ava DuVernay’s towering Selma is Hollywood’s definitive depiction of the 1960s American civil rights movement — as well as perhaps the most timely movie you’ll see this year.
  30. Literally the kind of movie they just don't make anymore, Michel Hazanavicius' French-sponsored charmer The Artist is a gorgeous black-and-white love letter to silent Hollywood with old-fashioned English intertitles and just a single line of audible (English) dialogue.

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