New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,859 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Seven Five
Lowest review score: 0 The Adventures of Pluto Nash
Score distribution:
6,859 movie reviews
  1. Since this low-grade comedy doesn't really even attempt to be funny, the purpose of the movie is to establish (or reinforce) a feeling of luxurious old-timey melancholy.
  2. A kind name for this attitude is false moral equivalence, or perhaps post-imperial cringe. A less kind one is Western self-hatred, or an urgent plea to tolerate the intolerant.
  3. The image that sticks with you here is a smoky pub where the patrons are singing "You Belong to Me.''
  4. The story is fascinating, infuriating and even laugh-out-loud funny at times.
  5. Loving but overlong meditation on movies and the people who make them.
  6. A loving tribute to cinema by Tsai Ming-liang, one of Taiwan's most accomplished and popular directors.
  7. A pleasing fable reminiscent of G-rated nature movies of the '60s and '70s, before kiddie cinema required CGI or hip cultural references.
  8. Deadly serious about its message: that the West is just as vicious and corrupt as Africa.
  9. Larson shines as an adult staffer assigned to keep these self-destructive kids safe while they work with therapists.
  10. Algenis Perez Soto was a baseball player in real life, which helps to explain his sensitive, understated performance as Sugar. But he's let down by a manipulative script recycled from dozens of sports and immigrant movies. At least it dispenses with a Hollywood ending.
  11. We may not need another IRA movie, but even so, Ken Loach's Brit-bashing historical drama The Wind That Shakes the Barley, winner of the top prize at Cannes last year, raises hard questions about Ireland's uncanny ability to kneecap itself.
  12. This weekend, forget "Jarhead" - two hours of guys playing grab-ass in the shower and no chicks. If you're lucky, you can con your girlfriend into seeing Pride & Prejudice.
  13. To paraphrase that old quip about slow-paced art films, it literally is watching paint dry.
    • New York Post
  14. His (Friedkin) very lack of subtlety is both the strength and weakness of The Exorcist in the 21st century.
    • New York Post
  15. A thrillingly vicarious experience that answers a primal urge to join our feathered friends as they soar and glide in the blue beyond.
  16. With its dry wit and all-star household, Baumbach's movie resembles Wes Anderson's "The Royal Tenenbaums" without the heavy whimsy.
  17. One of the year's most consistently entertaining and ingratiating movies, building to an inspirational climax that's as rousing as it is predictable.
  18. Overall, this gorgeously designed and photographed movie artfully depicts the immigrant experience in ways that transcend its setting, melding Hollywood and Bollywood storytelling techniques to weave a tale a large audience will relate to.
  19. Baumbach seems mainly interested in capturing the whimsical rhythms of unformed post-college life, with money too scarce and roommates too ample — but he already did that, did it better and with more rueful feeling, in the much funnier “Kicking and Screaming,” the debut he made at 25 and one of the best films of the 1990s.
  20. Hunger is almost silent, most of its sounds being unintelligible moans and screams.
  21. A Hijacking is Lindholm’s second feature as director; he’s also worked with such austere Danes as Thomas Vinterberg of Dogme 95 fame. What he’s learned, it seems, is how to strip away distractions, and let character become suspense, as well as destiny.
  22. A gut-wrenching experience.
  23. Not exactly as well known as Megadeth or Metallica, Anvil did indeed have 15 minutes of fame back in the 1980s. Then it went into obscurity. Now it's back, trying like hell to be somebody.
  24. The loose feel and sense for random comedy (as when a bore suddenly starts lecturing Coogan about the geological details of the cliff he is standing on) are spiffy.
  25. This movie belongs to its young stars, who have grown immensely as actors since they were first ideally cast by Chris Columbus, the hack who directed the first two movies.
  26. There are more than ample rewards for discerning adults: Some of the best dialogue in a recent movie and a gallery of unforgettable performances.
  27. It's the well-wrought details that explain, perhaps better than any earlier film, how an entire country bought into Hitler's genocidal madness.
  28. The teen movie The Spectacular Now begins like “Say Anything” but soon turns into “Drink Anything.”
  29. Despite having no previous film experience, Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson give evocative performances as Oskar and Eli, respectively.
  30. Literate and engrossing, with excellent performances.

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