New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,730 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Knocked Up
Lowest review score: 0 Goodbye to Language 3D
Score distribution:
6,730 movie reviews
  1. Algenis Perez Soto was a baseball player in real life, which helps to explain his sensitive, understated performance as Sugar. But he's let down by a manipulative script recycled from dozens of sports and immigrant movies. At least it dispenses with a Hollywood ending.
  2. We may not need another IRA movie, but even so, Ken Loach's Brit-bashing historical drama The Wind That Shakes the Barley, winner of the top prize at Cannes last year, raises hard questions about Ireland's uncanny ability to kneecap itself.
  3. This weekend, forget "Jarhead" - two hours of guys playing grab-ass in the shower and no chicks. If you're lucky, you can con your girlfriend into seeing Pride & Prejudice.
  4. To paraphrase that old quip about slow-paced art films, it literally is watching paint dry.
    • New York Post
  5. His (Friedkin) very lack of subtlety is both the strength and weakness of The Exorcist in the 21st century.
    • New York Post
  6. A thrillingly vicarious experience that answers a primal urge to join our feathered friends as they soar and glide in the blue beyond.
  7. With its dry wit and all-star household, Baumbach's movie resembles Wes Anderson's "The Royal Tenenbaums" without the heavy whimsy.
  8. One of the year's most consistently entertaining and ingratiating movies, building to an inspirational climax that's as rousing as it is predictable.
  9. Overall, this gorgeously designed and photographed movie artfully depicts the immigrant experience in ways that transcend its setting, melding Hollywood and Bollywood storytelling techniques to weave a tale a large audience will relate to.
  10. Baumbach seems mainly interested in capturing the whimsical rhythms of unformed post-college life, with money too scarce and roommates too ample — but he already did that, did it better and with more rueful feeling, in the much funnier “Kicking and Screaming,” the debut he made at 25 and one of the best films of the 1990s.
  11. Hunger is almost silent, most of its sounds being unintelligible moans and screams.
  12. A Hijacking is Lindholm’s second feature as director; he’s also worked with such austere Danes as Thomas Vinterberg of Dogme 95 fame. What he’s learned, it seems, is how to strip away distractions, and let character become suspense, as well as destiny.
  13. A gut-wrenching experience.
  14. Not exactly as well known as Megadeth or Metallica, Anvil did indeed have 15 minutes of fame back in the 1980s. Then it went into obscurity. Now it's back, trying like hell to be somebody.
  15. The loose feel and sense for random comedy (as when a bore suddenly starts lecturing Coogan about the geological details of the cliff he is standing on) are spiffy.
  16. This movie belongs to its young stars, who have grown immensely as actors since they were first ideally cast by Chris Columbus, the hack who directed the first two movies.
  17. There are more than ample rewards for discerning adults: Some of the best dialogue in a recent movie and a gallery of unforgettable performances.
  18. It's the well-wrought details that explain, perhaps better than any earlier film, how an entire country bought into Hitler's genocidal madness.
  19. The teen movie The Spectacular Now begins like “Say Anything” but soon turns into “Drink Anything.”
  20. Despite having no previous film experience, Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson give evocative performances as Oskar and Eli, respectively.
  21. Literate and engrossing, with excellent performances.
  22. Once it calms down and stops trying to be funny, it turns into a thoughtful and intriguing drama.
  23. The movie has enormous force - because it's about a genius, yes, but even more so because of the intelligence, passion and wit of the people who knew Marley.
  24. The White Ribbon is one of the finest films that ever repelled me, a holiday in the abyss.
  25. An extraordinary experience: an original and brilliant combination of comedy, action and sophisticated political comment -- the best American movie of the year thus far.
  26. A stunning achievement, every bit the equal of the classic moun taineering book which inspired it.
  27. The Agronomist uses archival footage and music to tell a moving story that's all too common in the Third World.
  28. As Kym, Hathaway runs an astonishing gamut of emotions, from anger to fragility and from hurt to regret - without ever seeming actress-y, like Nicole Kidman. Start clearing that mantelpiece, Anne.
  29. Le Havre is warm-hearted and uplifting, without being schmaltzy or preachy. And, with its illegal-alien theme, it's dead-on timely.
  30. Side by Side is an eye-opening, comprehensive look at the biggest technological revolution in Hollywood history. One huge irony is that digital formats are evolving so rapidly that the only foolproof way to archive and preserve a movie shot on video for future generations is . . . to transfer it to film.

Top Trailers