New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,840 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Far from Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 6 Month Rule
Score distribution:
6,840 movie reviews
  1. If there's an awkward moment, it's the scene in which the monks take part in a sort of Last Supper, drinking wine while Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake" plays in the background. You keep waiting for Natalie Portman to twirl into the room.
  2. There’s an exhilarating sadness to it all that amounts to cinematic poetry.
  3. A sentimental, whimsical autobiography.
  4. With Japan facing a new nuclear crisis, this beautifully composed and acted heart-wrencher -- couldn't be more timely.
  5. This superb documentary about the Catholic Church's worst pedophile scandal is in many ways far scarier than any fiction.
  6. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  7. A blue-chip Oscar contender that's also a rousing popcorn movie, Ben Affleck's Argo offers plenty of nail-biting thrills as well as funnier scenes than you'd ever imagine possible in the grim context of the Iran hostage crisis.
  8. A sensitive and subtle meditation on aging, loss and bereavement.
  9. Atriumph on almost every level. It is breathtakingly stylish, wonderfully acted and its three interrelated tales of the "war" on drugs are brilliantly structured to form a cohesive, powerful whole.
  10. Isn't quite as accessible or as deeply moving as his masterpiece, "All About My Mother." It's a tad too self-consciously a work of art for that. But it's still a must-see for anyone who's halfway serious about film.
  11. A thought-provoking documentary that would go well on a double bill with Richard Linklater's fictional "Fast Food Nation."
  12. It's a sharply written, unforgettably directed character study with brilliant performances by Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams - far more intimate but no less intense than director Paul Thomas Anderson's Oscar-winning last film, "There Will Be Blood.''
  13. So terrifically entertaining, it would be a shame if it didn't inspire a companion piece on New York.
  14. The 34-year-old Meadows has assembled an effective cast, especially newcomer Thomas Turgoose as Shaun and veteran Stephen Graham as Combo.
  15. Can be summed up in one word: style.
  16. Not for all tastes, but it demonstrates Loach's skill as a poet of gritty semi-documentary filmmaking.
  17. The real star of The Son isn't lead actor Olivier Gourmet. It's the back of his neck, which the camera obsessively focuses on throughout this difficult but rewarding Belgian drama.
  18. The profanity-laced but witty and literate dialogue by William Monahan ("Kingdom of Heaven") is delivered by a brilliantly chosen cast, almost all of whom are operating at the very top of their game.
  19. This environmentally themed, very loose version of Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Mermaid" is never going to be mistaken for Disney's musical of the same name.
  20. The movie is more a situation than a narrative, and it's repetitive and depressing. One interrupter -- a murderer who did 14 years in prison -- says of the program, "In essence, it's just a Band-Aid." At best: One of his colleagues gets shot in the back for his peacekeeping effort.
  21. A mouse and a bear defy social convention to forge a friendship in this lovely, charming and Oscar-nominated French animated feature (now available dubbed into English with the voices of Forest Whitaker and other notables).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A flat-out masterpiece, surely the best movie of the year; indeed, an all-time classic.
    • New York Post
  22. The closing subtitle says that no one was ever prosecuted for this madness. The pure-archive approach leaves a taste of despair; civic governance, it seems, can’t even promise not to kill you.
  23. A startling look at the devastating human cost of China's newfound embrace of capitalism.
  24. The best reason to wade into this (let's be honest) challenging but hugely rewarding film is Quvenzhané Wallis.
  25. Fans of Hou know just what to expect from his slow, contemplative films - and they won't be disappointed.
  26. Anyone expecting a hard-hitting biography will be disappointed by Julian Schnabel's soft-edged, dreamy and relatively nonpolitical film.
    • New York Post
  27. Director Paul Greengrass - who directed the superb "United 93" between the second and third "Bourne" installments - knows how to stage and edit bravura action sequences, generating almost unbearable suspense while deploying a superb cast.
  28. Visually flat and uninteresting and too often feels like a (leisurely paced) filmed play.
  29. The Pianist recalls "Schindler's List," even down to its weakness: Just as Spielberg's film turned sentimental in its final half hour, Polanski's work, too, has a schmaltz coda. But that doesn't make The Pianist any less effective.

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