New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,867 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Seven Five
Lowest review score: 0 The Adventures of Pluto Nash
Score distribution:
6,867 movie reviews
  1. Ron Howard's splendid The Da Vinci Code is the Holy Grail of summer blockbusters: a crackling, fast-moving thriller that's every bit as brainy and irresistible as Dan Brown's controversial bestseller.
  2. I can't wait to see Borat, which has twice as many laughs as all of this year's other movie comedies combined, for a fourth time.
  3. Happy Feet is not only the year's best animated movie, it's one of the year's best movies, period. Go.
  4. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  5. All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
  6. Four stars simply aren't enough for Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire, which just may be the most entertaining movie I've ever labeled a masterpiece in these pages.
  7. May not have the starry casts of the Coens' more recent films, but it has plenty of heart and soul.
  8. You have never seen a movie like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon because there has never been a movie like it.
    • New York Post
  9. An absorbing, deeply affecting, well-acted --and remarkably evenhanded -- antiwar statement. It's also incredibly suspenseful and very blackly funny.
  10. It’s that priceless dialogue, the bitter ironies, the magnificently skeevy cast of characters and even the overall structure that make The Seven Five “Goodfellas” in blue.
  11. The moral alertness of the film is of the level normally confined, in military pictures, to talky courtroom scenes, yet Eastwood skillfully works dilemmas into propulsive and suspenseful action.
  12. Director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s film combines allegory, brutal melodrama, black humor and strikingly beautiful compositions, each frame dense with meaning. Leviathan stays absolutely gripping, right up to the O. Henry twist that slams the film shut.
  13. A rare case of an American remake that actually improves on a European movie.
  14. Brilliantly acted and directed, Ava DuVernay’s towering Selma is Hollywood’s definitive depiction of the 1960s American civil rights movement — as well as perhaps the most timely movie you’ll see this year.
  15. 24-karat stuff, even if it has a soul of tin. With the voices of Ewan McGregor, Robin Williams and Mel Brooks, Robots is a giddy erector-set update of "Toy Story" with a splash of "The Wizard of Oz."
  16. Russian Dolls is itself a delightful mini-trip to Europe. Its overly cute bits are like cinematic tourist traps, but it's the beauty that stays with you.
  17. This flick is fast and ferocious, his (Sidney Lumet) sharpest and best since "Prince of the City" (1980) - and surely one of the year's finest.
  18. Pure magic.
  19. A sublime variation on the buddy road movie, infusing the midlife crises of the two main protagonists with hope and poetry.
  20. Comes as close to perfect as any movie I've seen lately.
  21. Each scene is breathtaking, such as a long shot of a river at a key moment, and an unforgettable soccer game played with no ball. Timbuktu deserves every accolade it gets.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I was reminded, at times, of the painstakingly detailed beauty of “The Triplets of Belleville,” but Moore has a more ethereal, rounded aesthetic all his own. They don’t make movies like this anymore — except when, lucky us, they do.
  22. Hands-down the best movie of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Go
    Breakneck, raucous and thoroughly exhilarating.
    • New York Post
  23. 56 Up is as good a point as any to get hooked on the magnificent half-century series of documentaries, beginning in 1964 with "7 Up."
  24. So consistently involving because the excellent cast delivers their lines with the kind of utter conviction not seen in this kind of movie since the first "Star Wars."
  25. It's like watching Alfred Hitchcock try to solve a Rubik's cube in a roadside diner.
    • New York Post
  26. Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
  27. Compared by some to “2001: A Space Odyssey,’’ Cuarón’s relatively intimate space epic is equally groundbreaking in the spectacular way it depicts space.
  28. Darkly hilarious, brilliantly acted.
  29. It's a wistful yet penetrating film, shot through with magic realism and life-affirming humor, that gets you deep down where you live.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If she (Paltrow) were the only good thing about Shakespeare in Love, it still would have been worth seeing; that she is the crown jewel in a glittering tiara of a film studded with writing and acting gems testifies to the deep pleasures to be found in this remarkable movie.
  30. At turns sexy, ultra-violent and sweet, it will infiltrate your brain long after you've seen it.
  31. You'll laugh, you'll cry -- the year's best movie.
  32. No adventurous filmgoer will want to miss Tony Takitani.
  33. Vividly re- creates TV news icon Edward R. Murrow's historic face-off with Sen. Joseph McCarthy in devastatingly low-key detail -- is the right movie at the right time.
  34. An unqualified triumph.
  35. The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
  36. This isn't a war movie. Rather, it's a powerful, heart-tugging portrait of the innocent victims of conflict.
  37. Without any preachiness, this magically beautiful film urges us to take better care of the bees, and honor the irreplaceable things that they do for us.
  38. It ranks among Robert Altman's best work ever, and that its many satisfactions derive in large part from a superbly written screenplay by Julian Fellowes that has no equal this year.
  39. Chance encounters and fated love are the stuff of fairy tales, which is what makes the deliriously romantic sequel Before Sunset a small miracle.
  40. That the story has largely gone untold is a shame, and Kennedy (daughter of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy) has done a service to the country in reminding us.
  41. Take note, Lars von Trier: This is how you do a truly funny, subversive movie about a woman’s obsession with the human body and sex.
  42. Up
    An exquisite work of cinematic art that also happens to be the funniest, most touching, most exciting and most entertaining movie released so far this year.
  43. Like a bomb exploding in a fireworks factory: It's fierce and shocking and dazzling and wonderful.
  44. It's not a knock on Steven Spielberg to say he is history's finest maker of children's movies. His capacity to evoke simplicity, awe, beauty and unconditional love are his genius, and his vision of the children's story War Horse is a gorgeous, majestic fable about a boy who yearns to be reunited with his steed.
  45. One of the year's best films and so tapped into the zeitgeist that it's positively scary.
  46. From the Hitchcockian opening credits to the final frame, Almodovar has Hitch on his mind.
  47. Delightfully unpredictable, hilarious comedy with wonderful performances that tug at your heart in ways that utterly transcend gender labels.
  48. Deserved an end-of-the-year prestige release, is a true work of art in a marketplace filled with velvet paintings. It's positively magical, the reason we loved movies in the first place.
  49. An extraordinary experience: an original and brilliant combination of comedy, action and sophisticated political comment -- the best American movie of the year thus far.
  50. A majestic conclusion to a nine-plus-hours epic that stirs the heart, mind and soul as few films ever have.
  51. This is a serious movie overflowing with memorable acting, unforgettable images, searing tragedy, unexpected humor and an eloquent plea for international understanding. And while it's by no stretch of imagination light entertainment, it's fundamentally a more optimistic work than either "Amores Perros" or "21 Grams."
  52. Chomet's wacky tale is so crammed full of eye-popping images, it's impossible to forget afterward.
  53. A spectacularly rendered tale of a family of superheroes, takes the art form to a whole new level.
  54. Those with the stomach to sit through Decline will be rewarded with a lively, masterful documentary.
  55. Porumboiu, who also produced and wrote, elicits remarkably deadpan performances from Teo Corban (as the show's host), Ion Sapdaru (the professor) and - especially - Mircea Andreescu, as the old man. Even the subtitles cracked me up.
  56. Christopher Nolan's dramatically and emotionally satisfying wrap-up to the Dark Knight trilogy adroitly avoids clichés and gleefully subverts your expectations at every turn.
  57. Break out the popcorn and prepare to be blown away. King Kong is the most pulse- pounding and heart-stirring romantic adventure since "Titanic."
  58. Masterful, atypically political - and flawlessly acted.
  59. The year's best foreign-language movie an absolute must-see.
    • New York Post
  60. A thrilling and propulsive drama.
  61. Old-school filmmaking at its best.
  62. Walk the Line superbly combines music and two of the year's most riveting performances to tell one of the screen's great love stories.
  63. Getting a small cohort of humanity dead right is an impressive artistic achievement, but Mike Leigh's beautifully modulated English drama Another Year advances even farther.
  64. As we face yet another summer of brooding superheroes, it's Magic Mike to the rescue! He's got the civilian alter ego and the acrobatic skills to rival Spidey or Batman.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A film of such cyclonic visual and emotional power, of such dazzling virtuosity and shattering humanity, that it is difficult to endure, yet alone describe. Savagely beautiful and savagely true, Saving Private Ryan is an excruciating masterpiece.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A flat-out masterpiece, surely the best movie of the year; indeed, an all-time classic.
    • New York Post
  65. This Belgian drama is the real deal, an alternately wrenching and ecstatic viewing experience, adapted from a play by lead actor Johan Heldenbergh.
  66. Ridiculous comedies can be fine, but the ones that matter creep up close to the truth. This one lives in it.
  67. Summer hasn't even started, but you won't likely find a better catch this season than Finding Nemo, a dazzling, computer-animated fish tale with a funny, touching script and wonderful voice performances that make it an unqualified treat for all ages.
  68. The best reason to wade into this (let's be honest) challenging but hugely rewarding film is Quvenzhané Wallis.
  69. It falls to Hanks and his movie-star presence to anchor this ambitious enterprise, and he does some of his most impressive acting without saying a word.
  70. Visually imaginative, The Theory of Everything is an unusually compelling true-life story about an extraordinary couple triumphing over adversity. It’s my favorite movie so far this year.
  71. A heart-pounding experience that makes you think and contains a gallery of characters that will haunt your nightmares for years to come.
  72. Like all great movies, 127 Hours takes us on a memorable journey. Which is not easy when 90 percent of the movie takes place with a virtually immobile hero in a very cramped setting.
  73. The latest episode of this ongoing masterpiece of reality TV -- which every seven years revisits a group of English people first interviewed as 7-year-olds in 1964 -- is every bit as enthralling as the earlier ones.
    • New York Post
  74. Its superb performances, music, photography, dialogue, its rhythms of tone and theme all complement each perfectly.
  75. Delightful performances are delivered by all in this ingenious work of cinema that is worth seeing if only for its glorious views of the Himalayas.
  76. You won't have a more viscerally emotional experience at the movies this year.
  77. Such is literature’s power that the cast is more at ease portraying ancient Romans than speaking as versions of themselves.
  78. The first movie I've seen in a very long while that deserves to be called a masterpiece. It's such a stunning achievement in storytelling.
  79. Denzel Washington dazzles in his best screen performance to date as Frank Lucas.
  80. A thrilling, beautifully crafted, fact-based horse story that's not merely the summer's finest movie, but may well be the one to catch come Academy Awards time.
  81. No film I’ve seen so far this year has provided the sheer moviegoing pleasure of We Are the Best!
  82. A sumptuous masterpiece by one of the greatest moviemakers of all time.
  83. Audacious, thought-provoking and ruefully funny.
  84. A great movie, period. It's great because it's so real.
  85. A stunning drama from that remote former Soviet republic.
  86. The androgynous Dobroshi is in nearly every scene. She has an exceptional screen presence that brings authority to her portrayal of a woman seeking redemption. As for the Dardennes, they prove yet again that nobody does human frailty the way they do.
  87. Rapturously elegant and deeply sexy in a deliciously restrained way. One of the most romantic movies I have ever seen, right up there with "Brief Encounter"and "Casablanca."
    • New York Post
  88. The surreal images, offbeat jokes and pointed human-rights allegory make this an altogether different experience from most American animation. It’s dreamy, poetic and not to be missed.
  89. Glossy, big-budget thriller that qualifies as the season's biggest and most rewarding surprise.
  90. A spare, exquisitely realized masterpiece about faith, redemption and boxing that beautifully illustrates his longtime philosophy that "less is more."
  91. A Hijacking is Lindholm’s second feature as director; he’s also worked with such austere Danes as Thomas Vinterberg of Dogme 95 fame. What he’s learned, it seems, is how to strip away distractions, and let character become suspense, as well as destiny.
  92. Everything a summer blockbuster should be but rarely is - a whip-smart, slam-bang piece of entertainment where we deeply care about the fate of the central characters.
  93. Nolan blurs the distinction between dreams and reality so artfully that Inception may well be a masterpiece masquerading as a summer blockbuster.
  94. Lee's incendiary and brilliant new film.
    • New York Post
  95. It's impossible to conceive of this ruefully funny entertainment without Bill Murray, who is nothing less than brilliant.

Top Trailers