Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,331 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Masters of Sex: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Murphy's Law (1988): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 871
  2. Negative: 0 out of 871
871 tv reviews
  1. TV's pre-eminent people-watching pleasure.
  2. Bigger, brassier and even more thrilling, Homeland has boosted the stakes.
  3. Burns and Ward pile on so much detail, alongside so much stunning footage, that by watching this whole spread--to borrow that famous and also well-rubbed line -- will be like arriving "where we started and know the place for the first time." Magnificent. Of course.
  4. Target is pure, utter, ridiculous, over-the-top-into-the-ravine entertainment.
  5. Watching the first couple of episodes once again I am marveling at how good the show really is. [16 Jan 2000]
    • Newsday
  6. A re-energized and immensely entertaining start to the third season.
  7. One of TV's best shows, comedy or drama, because this series often succeeds as both.
  8. This one is stylish, smartly produced and has a very appealing cast.
  9. Man, is this a good show...Boomtown is so good, it single-handedly restores your faith in broadcast networks. They can compete with the "freedom" of premium cable. All it takes is creative smarts. And NBC's Boomtown has plenty of those. [27 Sept 2002, p.B02]
    • Newsday
  10. You can't go wrong with Smith ("That '70s Show") or Lenehan, pros with impeccable comic timing, which leaves relative newcomers Bornheimer and Hayes. Thumbs-up here, too. Worst Week may be the best new comedy on network TV this season.
  11. From this, you will gain a keen understanding of what lies beneath those endless rows of markers at any military cemetery. This is an honest and often magnificent tribute to the 1st Marine Division.
  12. Like "Mad Men," Wife has an obsessive attention to detail; it's a hurricane of detail, in the visual touches, legal patter and the actors' unspoken flourishes. Nothing seems extraneous or out of place. Also like "Men," this show cares as much about silence as words, or that which isn't said (also a form of eloquence).
  13. Lean, laconic, precise and as carefully word-crafted as any series on TV, there's pretty much nothing here to suggest that the third season won't be as good as the second--or better.
  14. Unlike "Daddy Dearest," it's a warm, compassionate, story about a human problem the baby boomer generation sooner or later will be dealing with: what to do with geriatric TV set as they get on in years. It's not a big busy ensemble sitcom like "Cheers," more a one-man show for Grammer. But it's cozy, involving, socially relevant and marvelously amusing. [16 Sept 1993, p.93]
    • Newsday
  15. A luminous and fully alive portrait by a first-rate actress.
  16. Excellent actors playing excellent actors--and largely succeeding.
  17. Episodes is flawless and hilarious. What a pity it lasts only seven episodes.
  18. The show also feels more nuanced. If season 4 was like a giant exhaled breath, then season 5 is an inhaled one. The story beats are more deliberate. There's also a sharpened sense of building anticipation--or impending doom.
  19. The first three episodes totally nail it.
  20. Byrne is brilliant and--for the most part--so is this fine and absorbing show.
  21. A densely packed, well-paced gothic horror soap with surprisingly funny twists placed at the worst.
  22. Justified remains as good as ever--and as tautly written, acted and directed, and deeply, completely pleasurable as the fifth season, and the one before that and... all of the other seasons, too, now that I think of it.
  23. The show is well-conceived, well-written and very funny. [16 Sep 1991]
    • Newsday
  24. Not a single minute seems superfluous. This is all-engrossing, and all-informative.
  25. The producers ("Alias" alums Josh Appelbaum and Andre Nemec) have created a Dickensian (with a nod to L. Frank Baum) universe, draped in shadows, pastels and mystery, while aurally wrapped in chestnuts from the Sweet, Five Man Electrical Band and the Ramones. This new series has enormous promise.
  26. Interesting, engaging, worthwhile.
  27. They [directors John Dorsey and Andrew Stephan] know how much to say, and show, to viscerally deliver the sights, sounds and even smells, without scaring us away.
  28. Brownstein and Armisen move so effortlessly between characters, then execute their riffs, tics, styles and voices with such skilled abandon that before long this doesn't seem like satire any longer but a fun house mirror reflection of intensely real people.
  29. Louie very much remains Louie in the best sense.
  30. About as good a Community restart as anyone could have possible hoped for.

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