Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
For 894 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Munich
Lowest review score: 0 Meet Joe Black
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 894
894 movie reviews
  1. A wonderfully quirky cast under Francis Ford Coppola's direction makes this one of the more enjoyable John Grisham movies.
  2. Written with brio and staged rousingly by director Taylor Hackford, the film is good, kitschy fun -- after all, how can you hate a movie that casts litigators as the new legions of Lucifer?
  3. Unlike many dramas of middle-class family wreckage, which tilt toward soapoperatic revelations, The Ice Storm is told from an ironic, almost meditative distance that gives the movie its paradoxical power.
  4. A meditation on love, faith and science in the guise of a thriller, the movie's a tad schematic, but thoroughly gripping.
  5. Mingling reality and fantasy, Forster has given us a luminous, touching meditation on life and art.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here's a surprise: of the four actors in Closer, Clive Owen is the least famous, but he delivers the most memorable performance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pretty charming. Audiences may like it more than critics, but everyone should agree it's one of the most wickedly stylish movies of the year.
  6. Ultimately, one's reservations are overwhelmed by the story's urgency; it's impossible not to be shattered.
  7. A smooth mixture of satire and sentiment that owes an obvious debt to "The Apartment," not to mention "Jerry Maguire."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    New York City has never looked so slick and shallow as it does in Hamlet, an innovative, contemporary adaptation.
    • Newsweek
  8. Everyone will be tickled pink by this sleek Mike Nichols remake.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the film is clumsy and overheated at times, it is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful films of the year. Set in turn-of-the-century London and Venice, its rich colors and opulent textures will linger long after the plot has been forgotten.
  9. Powerful images hook you immediately.
  10. Day-Lewis, who imbues Jack with a ravaged, Keith Richards charisma, is once again extraordinary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's gory stuff, but it's also a visually arresting blitzkrieg with action so bare-knuckled you'll leave the theater spitting out teeth.
  11. Defies all laws of gravity in its pursuit of thrills and laughs—and it's so disarmingly eager to please that only a stone-faced kung fu purist could object.
  12. Explores both prepubescent and teen sexuality with an honesty that may make some people uncomfortable, which is a sign of its potency, and a badge of honor.
  13. Lucas manages to turn the audience's familiarity to his advantage: like a jigsaw puzzle whose final form has always been known, the fun is in discovering how the last pieces fit.
  14. As a history lesson (Depression 101), Cinderella Man feels a bit secondhand. As a true-grit tale of redemption, however, it lands one solid body punch after another.
  15. Has a flavor all its own-sweet, whimsical, homegrown. A quirky romantic for the 21st century, July finds humor and magic in places where no one has looked before.
  16. With Saraband, the great writer-director has stepped back into the ring for one last epic wrestle with his demons. There is, as always, no easy outcome. But no one ever fought for higher emotional and spiritual stakes.
  17. It's hands down the funniest of the year, both pushing the boundaries of bad taste and exploring how those boundaries keep shifting.
  18. In this gorgeously melancholic fresco of love affairs, Tony Leung Chiu Wai plays a womanizing pulp-fiction writer in '60s Hong Kong.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Directed by Tom Shadyac ("Ace Ventura"), it's nearly sociopathic in its quest for laughs, and busts a very big gut.
  19. A streak of pitch-black humor, some bawdy detours and a touch of sanguine, sun-baked poetry Sam Peckinpah would have liked.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The film delivers the warm fuzzies without apology, and you find yourself giving in.
  20. The uncontestable triumph of Goblet of Fire, however, is Brendan Gleeson's Alastor (Mad-Eye) Moody, the grizzled new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor.
  21. Jordan is always best on his native Irish turf, and he's in grand mischievous form in this picaresque fable.
  22. The Syrian Bride would be an out-and-out comedy were it set anywhere but in the Middle East.
  23. This is a movie that sticks its political neck out, that throbs with dread, paranoia and outrage, that doesn't coddle the audience by neatly tying things up.

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