Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
For 895 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Truman Show
Lowest review score: 0 Meet Joe Black
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 895
895 movie reviews
  1. Forest Whitaker, uncorking the power that he usually holds in check, gives a chilling, bravura performance as Ugandan tyrant Idi Amin, whose bloody regime slaughtered more than 300,000 people. This intelligent, sometimes gruesome thriller is based on a novel by Giles Foden.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Marvelous, and surprisingly intimate.
  2. An epic both raw and contemplative, is neither a flag-waving war movie nor a debunking.
  3. A welcome paradox--an intelligent, rousing adventure for grown-up kids. [17 Apr 1995, p.66]
    • Newsweek
  4. It's hard to believe this is von Donnersmarck's first feature. His storytelling gifts have the novelistic richness of a seasoned master. The accelerating plot twists are more than just clever surprises; they reverberate with deep and painful ironies, creating both suspense and an emotional impact all the more powerful because it creeps up so quietly.
  5. A heartbreaking comedy that is simultaneously funny and sad, raunchy and sweet, funky and elegiac. These fresh, unexpected juxtapositions are a specialty of the writer Hanif Kureishi ("My Beautiful Laundrette"), a sworn enemy of cliché.
  6. A wicked delight. Adapted by playwright Patrick Marber from Zoe Heller's acclaimed novel, it's at once a comedy of cluelessness and class, a melodrama of two women in the grips of wildly inappropriate obsessions, and a "Fatal Attraction"-style thriller.
  7. Loach hurls us into the fracas, circa 1920, and creates such a vivid sense of the nuts and bolts of guerilla war you almost forget you are watching a period piece. Unlike the epic sweep of Neil Jordan's "Billy Collins," which spoke in a syntax closer to Hollywood's, "The Wind" doesn't paint over its political arguments with a patina of nostalgia.
  8. Comedy and suspense, satire and shame are all mashed together--with breezy confidence.
  9. Thanks to everyone involved, the movie radiates a hundred pleasures.
  10. Summer hasn't arrived, but the funniest riff on a summer movie genre has already landed.
  11. For anyone who grew up worshiping at the shrine of Julie Christie, the notion that she could be playing a white-haired woman drifting into senility is a jolt to the system. But her radiance, beauty and talent are undiminished: she's hauntingly, heartbreakingly good.
  12. It happens to be one of the most wildly (and disturbingly) inventive animated films I've seen.
  13. It has the feel of a classic coming-of-age story. It's the sleeper of the summer.
  14. As a "Revenge of the Nerds" redux, Superbad isn't perfect. But it's super close.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Brilliantly strange, often funny and ultimately heartbreaking film.
  15. It sounds grimmer than it plays, thanks to Jenkins's sardonic, deadpan humor and the superb cast, who invest these damaged characters with rich, flawed, hilarious humanity. This bittersweet X-ray of American family dynamics may not be a Hallmark-card notion of a holiday movie, but it's one any son or daughter can take to heart.
  16. A great horror movie is like a good shrink--and a lot cheaper, too. It purges us through petrification. That horror movie, thankfully, has arrived. It's called The Orphanage," and it is seriously scary.
  17. Schygulla's heartbreaking performance--like the movie itself--will stay with you long after the film's quietly devastating final frame.
  18. Tropic Thunder is the funniest movie of the summer--so funny, in fact, that you start laughing before the film itself has begun.
  19. Most of the time, Demme's deliberately unstable mixture of moods and genres produces electric results. Rachel Getting Married takes a familiar subject--the raw nerves of American family life with--and draws fresh blood.
  20. Eastwood tells his haunting, sorrowful saga with such a sure, steady hand, only a very hardened cynic could fail to be moved.
  21. Desplechin is an inspired impurist. His Christmas Tale is untidy, overstuffed and delicious: a genuine holiday feast.
  22. Lyrical, original, misshapen and deeply felt, this is one flawed beauty of a movie.
  23. The images of war that Folman and his chief illustrator, David Polonsky, conjure up have a feverish, infernal beauty. Dreams and reality jumble together.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An extraordinary documentary.
  24. There hasn't been a studio movie as unapologetically adult, sophisticated, and nuanced as Up in the Air in some time.
  25. Crazy Heart gets to you like a good country song--not because it tells you something new, but because it tells it well. It's the singer, not the song.
  26. Rabbit Hole deftly sidesteps sentimentality and still wrenches your heart.
  27. Urgent, gritty, sometimes weirdly funny, The Fighter might be considered his first feel-good movie. But Russell's too honest and acute an observer to serve up affirmation without leaving a subversive aftertaste of ambivalence and unease.

Top Trailers