Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 649 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Boardwalk Empire: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 350
  2. Negative: 0 out of 350
350 tv reviews
  1. I wouldn't want to miss a word.
  2. Personally, I have even less interest in boxing than I do in those other worlds, so when I say I swallowed most of the 13-episode first season of FX's new boxing drama, Lights Out in a couple of marathon gulps, it's saying something.
  3. Grim it sounds and grim it is, but in choosing to focus on the kind of survival stories that no one signs up for but that to some extent eventually shape us all, it can be unexpectedly eloquent about love and loss.
  4. Bacon, always a watchable actor, is the perfect, and necessary, counterbalance to Purefoy.
  5. A pilot that was better than it sounded on paper (though I'm not sure there isn't more funny chemistry between Marcia Gay Harden--who plays Wife No. 1--and Akerman than there is between Whitford and Akerman).
  6. Arthur (Peter Gallagher) and Joan Campbell (Kari Matchett), one of my favorite TV pairings, continue to provide tantalizing glimpses of a marriage complicated enough to deserve its own spin-off.
  7. Frank Underwood may see himself as a man of action, but the odd explosion of violence notwithstanding, House of Cards is primarily a character study, one that can begin to feel a little stale after prolonged exposure. So maybe it's best to treat it like a box of chocolates. A piece (or three) at a time? Still delicious.
  8. Voight is perfectly cast as the one person who can plausibly terrify Ray, and he and Schreiber have a crackling chemistry. The supporting players are terrific, too, starting with Paula Malcomson as Ray's wife, Abby.... But it's Schreiber, who manages to convey a lot while seemingly remaining impassive much of the time, who somehow holds Ray Donovan together.
  9. [Dunham has] crafted an honest and at least occasionally hilarious show that might even live up to its hype.
  10. While the acting's first rate, it's the mystery that drives Five Days.
  11. [A case] that's gradually revealed to be more and more horrific. The only thing that makes watching this story unfold even slightly bearable are West and Watson's performances.
  12. The decision to create a Season 6 exit strategy for Lost may turn out to be one of the best things ever to happen to a TV series, restoring a sense of purpose for the show, which had been treading water.
  13. Two hours can be a long time for a show that's not heavy on action sequences, but "The Doorway" does eventually take us somewhere.
  14. Falco's simply magnificent in a role that exploits a certain no-nonsense quality she's always brought to even the nonsensical aspects of her characters.
  15. Crisis takes kids in jeopardy, class conflict and adolescent (and national) insecurity and stirs them into a surprisingly effective thriller.
  16. Together [Whitford and Hanks], well, they're just silly and in a way that made me feel a lot happier than anything on "24" has made me feel in a long, long time
  17. Without Sam, this might still have been a pretty good film about how modern science works (and sometimes doesn't), and filmmakers Sean and Andrea Nix Fine, who won an Oscar this year for their short film "Inocente," do a fine job of finding the drama in a process that's not always inherently dramatic.
  18. American Crime is aimed squarely at drama junkies. Especially those who, tired of having their thoughts and emotions prechewed, packaged and set to music, may have fled broadcast TV for cable, Netflix and Amazon.
  19. It says something about how unpatronizingly Last Tango treats its lovers that I wondered more than once during the six-episode first season (another's been ordered in Britain) if these two even belonged together.
  20. Writer-director Neil Jordan's first foray into series TV is everything you'd want in a premium-cable costume drama: lush, romantic, violent, tragic, funny--and far enough in the past that few of us are likely to argue.
  21. If you've loved every minute of Downton Abbey up to now, you'll likely still love it this season.
  22. Actors may come and go, inconveniently or not, and viewers may grouse, but Fellowes is composing a love letter to a way of life that's pretty much past.
  23. House is too often dismissed as a formulaic show, as if formula were always a bad thing. It breaks its boundaries often enough, and though tonight's episode--appropriately titled "Broken"--would seem to be a prime example of that, half the fun is seeing the formula applied to strangers, in a very strange land.
  24. It's a comic-book origins tale, but a satisfyingly adult one.
  25. Obvious or not, I watched most of the 10 episodes without the scene-setters and was occasionally lost. But if the battles aren't always distinctive, the characters are.
  26. If "Will & Grace" has an agenda, it's so well hidden that it can't possibly get in the way of the comedy. [21 Sep 1998]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  27. Based on what I've seen so far, we're looking at a killer season.
  28. While it's not always easy to watch Time of Death, which is bound to trigger memories for those who've logged time with the dying, it's a gift to spend time with its highly individual subjects, who resist a one-size-fits-all approach.
  29. Eureka remains my favorite of the two [the other is Warehouse 13], maybe because it seems to do a better job of integrating new characters - and viewers - even as it allows its writers to reset the show's reality as often as they choose.
  30. [Go On] is among the best new comedies of the season.

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