Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 619 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Murder One: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 332
  2. Negative: 0 out of 332
332 tv reviews
  1. It's a happy mix of childlike wonder and mildly adult humor--too mild for "Two and a Half Men," but maybe too adult for Saturday mornings--that allows Reubens to be timeless and yet topical. But again, only mildly so.
  2. Breckin Meyer and Mark-Paul Gosselaar go the buddy-comedy route in Franklin & Bash, a new lawyer show the network's calling an "offbeat drama"--though it's hard to think of something whose beats are this predictable as off-anything.
  3. Like Durant's ideal route, the five episodes I've seen of Hell on Wheels tend to meander a bit.
  4. There are a fair number of character quirks packed into that first hour, more, perhaps, than I remember from early episodes of "Bones," which built up its own quirky world a bit at a time.
  5. I'm not hooked, but I'm not yet planning my escape, either.
  6. There's a germ of a good idea in the massively overproduced Fashion Star.
  7. If you're moving on with The Killing, you're either a sucker for punishment or a hopeless fan of Detective Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) and her Scandinavian sweaters.
  8. Best Friends Forever is better than a blank screen, but beyond setting what I think might be a 2011-12 season record--0 to vagina joke in 15 seconds--it doesn't do much to break through the sitcom clutter.
  9. It offers tantalizing glimpses of other movies it might have been.
  10. NBC's Saving Hope, another of those Canadian imports with which frugal networks pad out their summer schedules, plays like a very special episode of Grey's.
  11. [Larry Hagman's eyebrows] are the most contemporary thing about the "new" Dallas, which otherwise looks and feels like a chunk of the '80s trapped in amber.
  12. The Newsroom is both wonderful and terrible.
  13. This is more soap opera than satire, an intermittently entertaining but not exactly subtle look at the private and public lives of one extremely colorful family.
  14. The first two episodes are so full of clunky explanations that it's impossible to forget for a moment you're watching a TV show.
  15. This one tries so hard to set up its premise that at times it ends up feeling more like a PSA than a comedy, which can be annoying if you're already on board with same-sex marriage and gay parenting.
  16. Frankly, it's a dispiriting season and I won't miss the show nearly as much as I'll miss Blake Ritson's charming turn as Sir Hallam's royal friend, the Duke of Kent.
  17. Hard-core lovers of historical drama who've made no other TV appointments this fall might find the time.
  18. I was far from convinced, but was left curious to know more about [Franklin D. Roosevelt vice president Henry] Wallace, which is maybe as much as anyone can expect from a TV show like this.
  19. The set-in-the-White House comedy starts off more annoying than funny in its Monday debut, overwhelmed by a single character, first son Skip (Josh Gad), a perennial college student and first-class screwup. Over the next couple of episodes the show becomes a little less grating and, occasionally, mildly amusing.
  20. The CW series that takes "Sex and the City" fashionista and sexual anthropologist Carrie Bradshaw all the way back to 1984 Connecticut, and high school, the fit's a little off.
  21. Sutherland's very moving as a father fighting to hold on to a son who was slipping away from him even before the authorities came calling, but the show still feels at times like a mashup of "24" and "Touched by an Angel."
  22. What's a little messy about Hemlock Grove isn't so much the corpses as the oddly paced story and the sometimes eye-rollingly silly dialogue, which occasionally leaves a more than competent cast looking less so.
  23. "Six Feet Under's" Rainn Wilson, in fact, is so weirdly compelling as Scott's hierarchy-obsessed assistant that he just might make the whole exercise worthwhile. [24 Mar 2005, p.36]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  24. The cops, led by Marc Lavoine, are an interesting mix, and the scenery's great. If only the crime itself didn't seem so drearily familiar.
  25. If you didn't like Sorkin's politics before, I doubt you'll be any happier with them this season.... Technology continues to be a bugbear for Sorkin (maybe that's why he was so prescient last season about the NSA stuff?), but stupidity in general seems more evenly distributed this season.
  26. As intrigued as I am by Sutter's willingness to bite off something bigger than his character's tongue to tell a story about the true costs of SAMCRO's business dealings, I'm not sure this is the time, or the place.
  27. If Ironside is going for more than cop-show-with-a-gimmick, it needs to go even bigger.
  28. There's nothing terrible about the pilot of NBC's Welcome to the Family, but nothing that explains how it attracted Mike O'Malley, Mary McCormack , Ricardo A. Chavira and Justina Machado.
  29. The originals strikes me as what "Dallas" might have been if J.R. and Bobby had been immortals. And living, of course, in the Big Easy.
  30. I'm not entirely sure where Tolan, Kinnear and company are going with this, but I'm only interested if they're willing to go all in. Because a toothless rake is of no use at all.

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