Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 750 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 414
  2. Negative: 0 out of 414
414 tv reviews
  1. American Crime is aimed squarely at drama junkies. Especially those who, tired of having their thoughts and emotions prechewed, packaged and set to music, may have fled broadcast TV for cable, Netflix and Amazon.
  2. It says something about how unpatronizingly Last Tango treats its lovers that I wondered more than once during the six-episode first season (another's been ordered in Britain) if these two even belonged together.
  3. Everyone has secrets, and, yes, lies. And a lot of Big Little Lies, from the to-kill-for ocean views to the kitchens, constitutes affluence porn. But there's honest emotion here, too, as well as small moments, like an unexpected one between Dern and Woodley late in the series, that help Big Little Lies float above the suds of soapy guilty pleasure.
  4. Writer-director Neil Jordan's first foray into series TV is everything you'd want in a premium-cable costume drama: lush, romantic, violent, tragic, funny--and far enough in the past that few of us are likely to argue.
  5. If you've loved every minute of Downton Abbey up to now, you'll likely still love it this season.
  6. Actors may come and go, inconveniently or not, and viewers may grouse, but Fellowes is composing a love letter to a way of life that's pretty much past.
  7. Aaron Tveit's Danny won't make anyone forget John Travolta, but his Broadway chops showed in the live format, and Julianne Hough was an enchanting Sandy. Vanessa Hudgens' Rizzo? Adorable. But the MVP of Grease: Live has to be director Thomas Kail, who segued from Broadway's Hamilton to Rydell High and along with Alex Rudzinski, pulled off the most ambitious live TV musical in my memory, anyway.
  8. House is too often dismissed as a formulaic show, as if formula were always a bad thing. It breaks its boundaries often enough, and though tonight's episode--appropriately titled "Broken"--would seem to be a prime example of that, half the fun is seeing the formula applied to strangers, in a very strange land.
  9. It's all happening at a manic pace, but the five episodes I've seen--of a 10-episode season--are smartly written, heartfelt, and frequently funny.
  10. It's a comic-book origins tale, but a satisfyingly adult one.
  11. Obvious or not, I watched most of the 10 episodes without the scene-setters and was occasionally lost. But if the battles aren't always distinctive, the characters are.
  12. If "Will & Grace" has an agenda, it's so well hidden that it can't possibly get in the way of the comedy. [21 Sep 1998]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  13. Based on what I've seen so far, we're looking at a killer season.
  14. The Knick is as engrossing and disturbing as ever, and the medical gore's only a small piece of it.
  15. While it's not always easy to watch Time of Death, which is bound to trigger memories for those who've logged time with the dying, it's a gift to spend time with its highly individual subjects, who resist a one-size-fits-all approach.
  16. Eureka remains my favorite of the two [the other is Warehouse 13], maybe because it seems to do a better job of integrating new characters - and viewers - even as it allows its writers to reset the show's reality as often as they choose.
  17. [Go On] is among the best new comedies of the season.
  18. As odd-couple partners go, they're [Marco Ruiz (Demian Bichir) and Sonya Cross (Diane Kruger) are] wonderfully imperfect. {The] 91-minute pilot is full of surprises, large and small, and sets the scene for a larger story.
  19. The Honorable Woman" doesn't give itself away easily--I was well into the eight episodes before a few things began to be clearer--but Blick uses his other characters so effectively that the wait doesn't seem wasted.
  20. Battle Creek is a whimsical, even genial, cop show.
  21. The presentation may be Hitchcockian at times, but there is nothing fun or arch or cartoonish or even particularly original in the violence that permeates Luther. It is, quite simply, terrifying, and we are meant to take it as seriously as Luther himself does.
  22. The patients, too, are easier to take. With no one in sight that Paul's likely to get mushy over--the way he did so disastrously with Laura (Melissa George) last season--we're free to admire Mahoney's artistry as a CEO with panic attacks or to root for young Oliver, whose parents need therapy more than he does.
  23. There are a few occasions when Clinton, a politician used to rolling right over interviewers to get his message out, finds himself speaking at the same time as Costello, but it's only noticeable because the host is for the most part the most self-effacing of interviewers.
  24. I still don't know where it's headed, but it feels, finally, as if we could be getting somewhere.
  25. A dramatically satisfying story that embraces the second half of the F. Scott Fitzgerald line, "Show me a hero and I'll write you a tragedy."
  26. Schilling's Piper, engaged to the supportive Larry (Jason Biggs) and dodging the attentions of her former lover (Laura Prepon) as well as more aggressively amorous inmates, displays a nice comic sense as she encounters one prison Catch-22 after another. The supporting cast is a strong one. But it's Kate Mulgrew, as the inmate who rules the prison kitchen with an cast-iron fist, who steals every scene she's in, and should leave Netflix's streaming subscribers begging for more.
  27. Adventure lovers of both sexes should want Outlander.
  28. Even with Barrett and Spencer's characters there to remind us that the good old days weren't good for everyone, and the hint of some overarching conspiracy, there's a romance to Timeless that so far makes it worth the trip.
  29. Dollhouse is less about the ninja kicks and witty banter than it is about instant transformations, and about making the audience care about a character who's likely to behave differently every time we see her. That Dushku mostly pulls this off is a happy surprise, as is Dollhouse, which has survived "Firefly"-like trials of its own to get this far.
  30. Frances McDormand takes the difficult title character from Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer-winning collection of short stories out for a slightly different spin, but the result is less a challenge to Strout's vision than a broadening of it.

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