Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 618 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 331
  2. Negative: 0 out of 331
331 tv reviews
  1. Let's get this out of the way. Last fall's best new drama and this fall's best new drama have one thing in common: a 15-year-old girl. [18 Sept 1995, p.43]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  2. It has plenty to say about the things humans are capable of and, like most great series, it rewards the careful viewer.
  3. The best show on television.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This show is so deliciously perverse that washing up afterward just seems the natural thing to do. [6 Apr 1990, p.75]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  4. Game of Thrones continues to tease out the most meaningful stories from George R.R. Martin's still unfinished fantasy series, "A Song of Ice and Fire," straying where necessary to highlight a possibly neglected character or perhaps just to produce something slightly less depressing.
  5. Matthew Weiner's stylish soap opera continues to be both stylish and sudsy in about equal parts, and, as always, I'd be happy to spend most of my time at the office with Don, learning the secrets of advertising and ignoring his mess of a personal life, if not for Don's precocious daughter, the inimitable Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka).
  6. There's mystery, because the murder case is unresolved, but the drama lies in discovering what prison has made of Daniel and in seeing how he and those around him deal with the walls that still keep them apart.
  7. [There's] a level of ambiguity executive producers Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa might not have gotten away with when they were writing for Kiefer Sutherland's Jack Bauer on "24," but it's part of what makes Homeland, adapted from an Israeli series created by Gideon Raff, one of the season's most intriguing dramas.
  8. A haunting, beautifully executed French series, whose horror reveals itself so gradually that it may be Thanksgiving before you fully understand why what feels at times like a wonderful dream is premiering on Halloween.
  9. Transparent is either the best new series most people are unlikely to see or the best excuse Amazon can give you for signing up for a month's free trial.
  10. As always, execution matters. Broadchurch's is practically note-perfect.
  11. It's no mean feat, either, to follow three highly entertaining reinventions of stories involving one of literature's most adapted characters with three more even better than the first. But it must not be impossible, because Sherlock has done it.
  12. This is extraordinarily ambitious and entertaining television, wherever its pedigree.
  13. It's quibbling to say that it feels at times as if Downton Abbey had been custom-designed for those of us for whom period romance is mother's milk, studded as it is with plucky heroines, accidental heirs and scheming dowagers, with just enough history thrown in to make the melodrama seem highbrow. It's not, really, though. It's simply delicious fun.
  14. Executive producers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have so far done a remarkable job adapting a story with even more moving parts than the show's very cool title sequence.
  15. TV--or whatever it is we're calling Netflix--doesn't get much better than that.
  16. Showing people having sex while wired up to machines may have gotten viewers in the door, but it's the characters and the performances that should keep them there.
  17. Frances McDormand takes the difficult title character from Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer-winning collection of short stories out for a slightly different spin, but the result is less a challenge to Strout's vision than a broadening of it.
  18. While I'm thrilled to have something as deep and juicy as The Wire back after so long a break between seasons, I'm afraid that the show's very best years may be behind it.
  19. [Phillips says] "Money, guns, America's going to get you whatever you need." And so--at least for those who prize artful ambiguity over dull certainty--should The Americans.
  20. Boardwalk Empire has been the glittering light at the end of HBO's tunnel for so long now that you might wonder if it--or any other show--could possibly live up to the hype. Amazingly, it does.
  21. Certainly there's nothing fussy about the almost instantly endearing Treme, which matches some of the best actors working today with characters worth the hustle you'll need to catch up with their interwoven stories.
  22. Two hours can be a long time for a show that's not heavy on action sequences, but "The Doorway" does eventually take us somewhere.
  23. I still don't know where it's headed, but it feels, finally, as if we could be getting somewhere.
  24. If you've seen "The Killing," you may think you've already seen some version of the story that filmmaker Jane Campion is telling in the Sundance Channel's new miniseries, Top of the Lake, but I promise you, you haven't.
  25. This new-to-you season of "Friday Night Lights" is more than worth the wait.
  26. [Dunham has] crafted an honest and at least occasionally hilarious show that might even live up to its hype.
  27. McConaughey and Harrelson are terrific together and intriguing apart, and whatever went on or is going on between them, and in the sadly complicated community they serve, is more interesting than the murder mystery that's meant to drive the story.
  28. Obvious or not, I watched most of the 10 episodes without the scene-setters and was occasionally lost. But if the battles aren't always distinctive, the characters are.
  29. Prohibition is barely more than a gulp next to Burns benders like "Baseball" and "Jazz," but it packs a punch, both as a cautionary tale and as entertainment.

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