Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,357 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 In the Mood for Love
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
3,357 movie reviews
  1. Moreno, with her wide, watchful eyes, owns the camera - and the film. Her performance is perfectly natural and profoundly moving. Maria Full of Grace is a remarkable picture, full of suspense and discovery.
  2. Without doubt one of the scariest, creepiest, gut-churningly unsettling pictures to come along in ages.
  3. Exhilarating, edgy and wryly comic.
  4. It's action opera, sword-and-sorcery song-and-dance, and it's a heart-pumping, jaw-dropping thrill. OK, so I kind of like the thing.
  5. A movie with the sweet soul of "Toy Story" and the boisterous spirit of "Spy Kids."
  6. This heartbreaking film, with its rich performances and simple eloquence, lays claim to greatness.
  7. Fulfills the promise of its title: It's transporting, it's magical.
  8. It's a quietly powerful work, pulsing with gentle humor and a gripping sense of imminent calamity and dread.
  9. Brilliant, blistering account of the many ways fame deforms a star, his family and his fans.
  10. With no-nonsense narration by Peter Coyote and a soundtrack that's at once apt, ironic and really, really good, The Smartest Guys in the Room is anything but a dry dissection of a major Wall Street debacle.
  11. Kings and Queen, full of passion and humor, madness and grief, is close to a masterpiece. It's like life: messy, impossible, elating, unavoidable.
  12. Cinderella Man is not a movie about boxing, but about this boxer who personified the heart and hope of 1935.
  13. A mischievously inventive, surreal entertainment, one that celebrates not only Whipple Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight and Nutty Crunch Surprise but Busby Berkeley, Stanley Kubrick, the Beatles, and the outer-space acting choices of one Johnny Depp - not to mention those bushy-tailed rodents in all their bustling splendor.
  14. Werner Herzog's magnificent tragedy, Grizzly Man, a Shakespearean character study that packs the sheer terror of "The Blair Witch Project."
  15. Simply the best adaptation of any John le Carré thriller to make it to the screen.
  16. A visually dazzling mood piece.
  17. For two hours I felt like a kitten chasing an elusive ball of catnip that remained just beyond my paw.
  18. The Conformist has a decadent visual beauty about it that's breathtaking. But as striking as Bertolucci's classic looks, there's even more powerful stuff in the storytelling.
  19. Wily, sad, funny, and full of life.
  20. Whether it's simply the change of locale, or a change in Allen's psyche, something is up in Match Point. With a dark view of humankind, and of the vagaries of chance - bad luck, good luck, dumb luck - the filmmaker has crafted a wicked, winning gem.
  21. Like Hitchcock, only creepier, Haneke slowly cranks up the suspense.
  22. It's impossible to imagine anyone, right-leaning or left, coming away from this hugely important documentary unshaken by its representation of the United States and its military establishment.
  23. If that sounds highbrow and pretentious, it's not. The neat trick of Tristram Shandy is that the whole thing comes off as a lark.
  24. At the film's intimate best, it gives a guitar's perspective of the troubadour. He plucks his instrument as he plays our heartstrings. It's movie and music bliss.
  25. A quiet, loopy gem, Duck Season is a goofball celebration of old friends, new beginnings, adolescent freedom, and baked goods laced with a little something extra.
  26. It's Greengrass' way of asking a question that looms large in these post-9/11 days: Are we all praying to the same God, or is one man's God better than another, and one man's God vastly more terrifying?
  27. Profound, passionate and overflowing with incomparable beauty, Water, like the prior two films in director Deepa Mehta's "Elements" trilogy, celebrates the lives of women who resist marginalization by Indian society.
  28. Piercingly funny and unexpectedly moving account of that odd couple, Prime Minister Tony Blair (Michael Sheen) and HRH Elizabeth II (majestic Helen Mirren) and their back-channels affair.
  29. Courageous, shattering and exceptional documentary.
  30. Lives is a best-foreign-film nominee competing in a year that at least three movies in this category are stronger than Oscar's best-picture contenders.

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