Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,586 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Wendy and Lucy
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
3,586 movie reviews
  1. Career Girls doesn't have the sweep of Secrets & Lies, nor the venom of Naked (which also featured the riveting Cartlidge). But in the small world it keenly describes, the film packs an emotional punch - silly voices and all.
  2. Corinne's journey begins with an act of blind faith. The movie ends, but you have a palpable sense that the journey does not.
  3. Underlines the nightmare of entrapment so vividly captured in The Day I Became a Woman.
  4. The film treats the ensuing issues of conscience and compromise with subtlety and warmth.
  5. It's a movie with a pulse. Sometimes, it flies off the chart.
  6. A dynamic portrait of an artist by an artist, one as wry, audacious and erotically charged as its flamboyant subject.
  7. Adapted from the devilishly clever 1955 novel by master crime author Georges Simenon, The Blue Room is a dazzling deconstruction of the mystery genre that turns its conventions on their heads.
  8. Into the Abyss is a true-crime drama, to be sure, but in Herzog's hands it becomes something much more: an inquiry into fundamental moral, philosophical, and religious issues, and an examination of humankind's capacity for violence - individual and institutional.
  9. A bruising, dark comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Although it's set on the same frozen continent, Happy Feet Two is worlds away from its predecessor.
  10. For those dazed and dazzled by surf anarchists Noll and Clark, Hamilton comes off as the sport's technocrat, but he boldly goes where no surfer has gone before.
  11. A thinker and an educator, Zinn has led a life of commitment and compassion, and the film offers a loving tribute.
  12. What begins as Lafcadia's journey into the heart of darkness ends as his pilgrimage into the light. Stunning.
  13. Does what the best movies can do: take viewers to what might be unfamiliar places, into a culture with unique customs and traditions, and show, through drama and comedy, how the fundamental truths of the human experience need no translation.
  14. Crash fools around with chronology in a Tarantinoesque way that brings its story full circle. You could argue that as events, and people, merge, Haggis' spiky screenplay (cowritten with Bobby Moresco) gets to be, quite simply, too much.
  15. The filmmakers don't bother hammering home a backstory or explaining why David is crazy. They just throw us in the deep end and dazzle us with a series of violent encounters that ends with a deadly chase in a surreal fun house maze of mirrors.
  16. Mongol is great cinema, great fun.
  17. French movies are not so neatly resolved. In fact, the point of many French movies, such as this provocative one from director Laurent Cantet, is that some problems don't have satisfying solutions - or resolutions.
  18. Must-see stuff.
  19. Offers a sometimes lyrical, sometimes gut-turning portrait of war seen through the eyes of children.
  20. This beautiful, unfolding film is an antidote to the high-velocity, maximum-volume world most of us find ourselves immersed in, offering a glimpse into a rigorously spiritual alternative. Its calmness, its reflection, is full of allure.
  21. Filled with bleak, beautiful Hopperesque tableaus and strange characters whose lives intersect.
  22. With its mix of Lewis Carroll and William Gibson; Japanese anime and Chinese chopsocky; mythological allusions, and machine-made illusion, offers a couple of hours of escapist fun.
  23. Until a final conflict that more resembles a monster-truck jam than a superhero showdown, Iron Man is solid gold.
  24. Eastwood and Morgan's movie, with its epic natural disasters (and a terrifying, man-made one) is optimistic. Hokey, even. But it's beautiful, too.
  25. Its stars - especially the photogenic Leung and Cheung, fresh from Wong Kar Wai's jazzy romance In the Mood for Love - are wonderfully charismatic. And wonderfully athletic.
  26. Quiet, quirky gem.
  27. Wondrously emotional film, one that sneakily dismantles your defenses and purges grief you didn't realize you had.
  28. Fused with paranoia and almost unbearable suspense, The Hurt Locker is powerful stuff.
  29. At once guileless and profound.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer

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