Portland Oregonian's Scores

  • Movies
For 3,105 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Namesake
Lowest review score: 0 Yu-Gi-Oh!: The Movie
Score distribution:
3,105 movie reviews
  1. The Act of Killing is exemplary as a history lesson, a character study and a powerful argument for confronting the past.
  2. It's a bento box of shifts, feints, hints and small, sharp insights, built around a surprisingly deep core of feeling. And it confirms Coppola as an artist to watch and relish.
  3. In exchange for a small piece of your life, you receive an infinity.
  4. It's so full-blooded, smart, sexy, tense and absorbing, so cleverly written and shot and cut, so filled with superb acting and music, so perfect in its closing moment, that it surely ranks with the most impressive debuts in world cinema.
  5. The second action melodrama released in the United States this year by director Zhang Yimou, and if I prefer the previous one, "Hero," it's partly a matter of degrees.
  6. Takes on the air of a heist film as the preparations proceed, and even knowing the outcome, tension still remains.
  7. As slapstick, as satire, as sheer gut-busting comedy, Borat is top notch.
  8. The first to take a big-picture view of just how the plans for postwar occupation went so far off track.
  9. The acting is flawless, the world feels utterly real, and the finale accomplishes the miracle of finding in the everyday world something profound.
  10. Ida
    Just as austere and demanding as you'd expect a black-and-white film about a Polish nun to be. Don't let that scare you, though.
  11. It's a bit precious, yes, but its earnestness and joy carry you along, and its climax simply delights.
  12. Adventuresome, melancholy and exhilarating.
  13. Letters isn't a fun night at the picture show. It's slow and gloomy and achingly tragic. But it's a truly impressive achievement both in moviemaking and in its understanding of history.
  14. Music aside, what finally puts Once over and makes it a film you can watch more than once is its slight but thoroughly credible realism.
  15. Teems with pot smoke, body parts and profane outbursts -- you ride a giggly wave throughout, jokes and turn-ons and shocking sights alternating in buoyant fashion.
    • Portland Oregonian
  16. This is an awesome performance in an outstanding film, a film worthy, if you can imagine, of the book at its heart.
  17. Sergei Dvortsevoy's unclassifiable, verite-style film (shaky-cam alert!) is an endearing mix of intimacy, attention to detail and decidedly local humor.
  18. If it can seem like there's no end of films about the Holocaust, it might be because there is no bottom to the well of crime, inhumanity and evil described by that ghastly event.
  19. Recoing's performance is chillingly low-key -- sometimes you can swear that he believes his own fictions -- and Livrozet, making his film debut, has a perfect long-in-the-tooth charm.
    • Portland Oregonian
  20. The actors are all perfect and yet not. Christie, most obviously, is simply too gorgeous, even when she's meant to be rattled and lost; Pinsent is too credibly stolid; Dukakis never vanquishes an impression of sourness. These may be quibbles, but they add up.
  21. The film combines farcical and sinister tones, as well as textures of high polish and captured-in-the-raw neorealism, and it simply brims with energy and surprises.
  22. The result is a gripping film which, despite the annoying rugrat, demonstrates how part of leaving childhood behind is learning how and when to lie, and to do it well.
  23. As a film, Inside Job is polished enough, and fueled by piquant indignation, but it's also often scattershot and meandering.
  24. You will be heartened by the amazing sensation of watching one of the greatest works in the history of the medium unfold in front of you, piece by piece, year by year.
  25. It's a purely winning film.
    • Portland Oregonian
  26. Longer cut's slapdash additions make a cool, ambiguous film more literal; original 2001 version is far better.
  27. It's a fine, absorbing work, built with brilliance and without excessive showiness or flash. It feels, in fact, like a classic virtually upon its arrival.
  28. Up
    Is Up top-shelf Pixar? No. But is it quality summer movie entertainment? Absolutely. Even when the folks at Pixar aim to keep their feet solidly on the ground, they can't help but soar.
  29. The Grand Budapest Hotel shows Anderson engaging with the world outside his meticulously composed frames like never before.
  30. As unpleasant as so many of its going-on are, Wake in Fright works both as an early instance of "Ozploitation" cinema and as a harsh critique of Australian colonialism and the absurdity of trying to bring so-called civilization to this vast arid wilderness.

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