Premiere's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,070 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Munich
Lowest review score: 0 Boogeyman
Score distribution:
1,070 movie reviews
  1. One of the funniest, smartest, most moving pictures of the year.
  2. The result is a disturbing look into the so-called Wonder Years of adolescence, with convincing, award-worthy performances from each of its key players: Hunter, Wood, and Reed.
  3. While it may be excruciating to watch a speller miss a word by a letter, it's just as exciting to watch another kid jump the hurdle.
  4. I don't think we're going to see a better--a funnier or more genuinely heartwarming, for that matter--comedy this year.
  5. By the end of the film, one begins to recognize specific birds, rooting for their safe returns and saddened by some of their failures.
  6. Olivier Assayas latest effort could be mistaken for a hipper-than-thou thriller. But it isn’t--it’s in fact a difficult, challenging, and troubling art film. [October 2003, p. 19]
    • Premiere
  7. This is one of the year's most subtly moving films, and a strong affirmation of Coppola's substantial talent.
  8. Perhaps the greatest, most affecting articulation of the theme Eastwood has been exploring since 1990's "White Hunter Black Heart": how violence--real violence, not movie violence--perpetrated and experienced, can erode and/or obliterate the human soul.
  9. Although this installment is a beautiful stand-alone thang (check out how its chronology-juggling storyline creates a perfect circle, structure-wise).
  10. I haven't been crazy about a lot of Van Sant's recent work, but what he does here is simply astonishing. [November 2003, p. 25]
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  11. Documentarian Liz Garbus masterfully turns her minimalist camera's eye on young girls institutionalized at the Waxter Juvenile Facility near Baltimore.
  12. It's flat-out comedy all the way, head-spinningly clever (you'll be talking about a sequence set in the Louvre for weeks) and always engaging. For my money, it's the comedy of the year.
  13. Has a warmth that’s utterly enchanting, and a tenderness that’s genuinely touching. This is a real gem.
  14. With My Flesh and Blood, Karsh finds a worthy subject in the constant day-to-day challenges facing a truly extraordinary family.
  15. Big Fish really is a big delight.
  16. A phantasmagorical slab of epic entertainment that satisfies on every conceivable level.
  17. The thrills of this movie are aesthetic ones, the creation of new, ravishing imagery (and all three of our young heroes are beautiful enough to be up to this task), the surrender to dream logic, the adoration of the silver screen.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film feels like a natural successor to "The Wedding Singer's" strange blend of humor and humanity, a gently silly comedy that's actually romantic without making anyone sick in the process. And that just might be a first.
  18. Steven Spielberg turns the pure adventure of Saturday afternoon serials into a solidly entertaining spectacle.
    • Premiere
  19. A wildly imaginative, hugely entertaining tour de force that asks big questions about life and love and fate while never ceasing to fully engage the viewer.
  20. It really is a masterpiece--von Trier's first, as it happens.
  21. This is a movie of head-spinning richness.
  22. Soars gloriously into fluency and magic.
  23. Boasts both wicked satire and a big heart, and as a result, is nothing short of brilliant.
  24. Over the course of almost two and a half fascinating hours, they make a cogent, compelling, powerful argument, and they also make a terrific movie.
  25. Fantastic news, true believers: Spider-Man 2 is smarter, hipper, faster, funnier, and flat-out more electrifying than the original, swinging to new summer-movie heights as the greatest comic-book adaptation yet made.
  26. Yep, this movie is basically a yakfest, but an incredibly fluid and involving one, and if you have any kind of affinity for either of the characters, you’re bound to find the picture a kind of miracle.
  27. Garden State gets it. Not since "The Graduate" has a movie nailed the beautiful terror of standing on the brink of adulthood with such satisfying precision.
  28. Demme here shows off both the mastery of suspense that made "The Silence of the Lambs" a classic, and the humane understanding and appreciation of character that not just deepens but energizes this film.
  29. Provocative, quietly erotic, deeply romantic, and slyly witty (a cameo by a giant of punk rock is funny at first sight, and funnier still when you figure out the joke it's making), Code 46 is a very effective antidote to summer blockbuster bloat.
  30. Hero is one of the most beautiful and involving films of the year.
  31. The result is by far the most original comedy of the year. Russell might alienate some audience members here--but it’s possible they literally won't know what they're missing.
  32. Every performance here is wonderful, and the movie abounds in moments so true as to be cringe-worthy.
  33. Depp and Winslet in particular are, as you might expect, immaculate. I don't think there's another actor alive who can convey the intermingling of gentleness and passion with as much precision as Depp.
  34. Almodóvar has created a dense, audacious film in which layers of cinematic artifice lovingly camouflage (at least for a while) its characters’ dark, damaged heart.
  35. Aquatic maintains its buoyancy throughout.
  36. A remarkably appealing success story full of heart and humor and poignancy, with Swank as winning as she’s ever been.
  37. In the way that water can heal and harm, this film balances moments of dreamy spirituality with the salty harshness of family disputes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With 2001, Stanley Kubrick proved that a sci-fi movie could be philosophical rather than pulpy, profound rather than pedantic.
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  38. Delivers a polished and well-researched look at America 's largest corporate bankruptcy with a laser-sharp focus on the personalities, practices, and fates of the top executives behind the Enron meltdown.
  39. Brothers takes a scenario as old as Genesis – two jealous siblings spar over the affections of the same woman – and renders it fresh and immediate, by virtue of the warm, almost maternal, generosity director Susanne Bier shows her characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film succeeds on the strength of the four actresses, first and foremost America Ferrera, who beautifully essays the role of narrator Carmen.
  40. The plot is pretty convoluted, but Miyazaki has a very good handle on it and lavishes his customary heart, humor, and inventiveness on every situation he depicts.
  41. Every so often, a movie blindsides you, leaving you feeling different, enlightened, possibly even improved. Me and You and Everyone We Know is such a movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is as wonderfully realized an observation of female affinity as 1999’s great "The Dreamlife of Angels."
  42. Land of the Dead is Romero's long-awaited masterpiece, a slyly suspenseful and droll thrill-ride that expounds on both the highbrow and the chewed-off-brow concepts of his previous trilogy, then flippantly dismisses the cheap scare tactics of the control-pad generation's gimmicky genre knockoffs.
  43. I'm glad that 2046 is different from "Mood" even while being strangely of a piece with it. Like "Mood," it’s a movie of utter wonder and ravishment. But the key here is different.
  44. Herzog not only tells an incredible story but implies a dark metaphysic of the natural world that makes this film unsettlingly larger than its human subject.
  45. A superb effort by a first-rank director, and manna from heaven for Cheung fans.
  46. It's a rare film that can be convincingly tender, bitterly funny, and ruthlessly cutting over the course of fewer than 90 minutes. The Squid and the Whale not only manages this, it also contains moments that sock you with all three qualities at the same time.
  47. This is more than just the best animated comedy of the year--it's the best comedy of the year, period.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Newell puts his own stamp on the franchise and delivers the best Potter movie yet filmed.
  48. Playful, poetic, shocking, saddening, and ultimately gratifyingly and honestly big-hearted.
  49. Lee and company handle the particulars of the tale with the requisite meticulousness and exquisite taste that marks all the director's films.
  50. Three Burials is beautiful, authentic and brutally observant of human nature. With real Tex-Mex backdrops instead of the usual Monument Valley vistas and characters too complex to withstand simple white-hat/black-hat reductionism, Three Burials is a visionary portrait of the New West. This is the terrain of Eastwood and Peckinpah, saddled with the concerns of 21st-century life.
  51. This lengthy, nuance-filled story about how eye-for-an-eye stuff differs from theory to practice is one of the most considered, thoughtful, and involving movies of its kind.
  52. Scene for radiant scene, shot for nary a wasted shot, The New World is the most artfully sculpted film in American cinema this year.
  53. A compelling, rousing and at times strangely moving entertainment.
  54. For all its seeming simplicity, this is an emotionally and intellectually complex film that holds the viewer in a grip as tight as any classic thriller you can name.
  55. Never anything less than wholly engrossing. There's a lot of humor to be found here (primarily of the dark comedy variety) and the cumulative impact of Lazarescu's journey through the Bucharest medical system is quite powerful.
  56. Composed of relatively few events and scenes, it's often excruciatingly tense and never less than heartbreakingly human. And as much as I admire "Munich," Shadows leaves Spielberg's film in the dust in the moral-ambiguity department. Never before seen in the States, it's already on my year's ten-best list. (April 2006 Premiere)
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  57. The most impressive thing about the film's technical wizardry is, finally, how unimpressive it is. One doesn't leave the movie with a mind blown by visual bedazzlement but with a soul shattered by the profound sense of tragedy Linklater and company so beautifully put across.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This film, a raw howl of outrage and pain, is proudly one-sided, allowing a generation of wounded men and women to scream their betrayal.
  58. A triumphant revisiting of territory in which Scorsese is an unchallenged master -- the crime drama.
  59. How 49 Up differs from its precursors for the better is that it's the first to have its participants interact with Apted the filmmaker, no longer a one-sided interviewer.
  60. As it happens, each one of these tales is also a love story, and The Fountain is Aronofsky’s profession of faith concerning love’s place in the idea of eternity. It’s a movie that’s as deeply felt as it is imagined.
  61. Inland Empire is interchangably terrifying, maddening, shockingly hilarious and perversely exciting, and that's just to those who end up disliking it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Letters from Iwo Jima isn't just the film that Eastwood wanted to make, but one that the film's producer Steven Spielberg had tried to make twice with "Empire of the Sun" and "Saving Private Ryan."
  62. This intense film, a mix of horror, fantasy, and history that convinces on all those levels and mixes them up with dizzying brio, is a searing cinematic experience, a beautiful, terrifying vision from writer-director Guillermo del Toro.
  63. Burnett creates an insistently poetic, devastatingly ironic world and work.
  64. Black Book is Verhoeven's best film since "RoboCop": audacious, smart, shamelessly entertaining.
  65. It's the stuff of not quite dreams, and it's rendered with such accuracy and hilarity that I am tempted to call Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film For Theaters the most successful full-on surrealist film since Bunuel and Dali's 1930 "L'Age d'Or."
  66. Resnais employs all the tools of studio-bound moviemaking, silent-era to post-modern, in a way that is not only is consistently dazzling in a purely visual sense, but contains an empathy that lifts the picture to tragic heights even at those points at which it seems practically weightless.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With its use of aggressively cheerful hues that are equal parts Technicolor and Tim Burton Candyland, Fido is a "boy and his dog" movie thrown into a horror movie blender. This is perfectly realized in a jaw-droppingly funny "Timmy's trapped in the well" sequence that almost seems like it could have been made in the 50s had George Romero ever worked on "Lassie."
  67. The slapstick-comic set pieces involving Remy and Linguini's cooking struggles might solicit the admiration of Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati.
  68. One of Cronenberg's subtlest, most insinuating pictures, and one of the highlights of the year so far.
  69. A picture that certain Brits and connoisseurs of British colloquial English might call "a grower" … more moving and funny the more I think about it.
  70. It's also that he's really, honest-to-God, got one of those movie faces that doesn't even come along once every generation. It's astonishing.
  71. As stomach-churning a suspense exercise as the cinema has seen since the salad days of Hitchcock.
  72. Every performer in the international cast -- Seigner, de Bankole, von Sydow (magnificent as Bauby's father), and the late Jean-Pierre Cassel to name but a few -- completely disappears into each of their roles, which I think is as much a testament to Schnabel's talents as to theirs.
  73. While avoiding specious bromides about universality, Persepolis insists on communicating with its audience, and insists that communication and empathy are the keys to our survival.
  74. There Will Be Blood is, in fact, not a historical saga; rather, it's an absurdist, blackly comic horror film with a very idiosyncratic satanic figure at its core.
  75. The result is one of the odder and, certainly the most compelling of the short stream of Broadway-to-Hollywood transplants of recent years. The interweaving of the music and the visuals casts an unusual, restive spell of delight and unease.
  76. A remarkably engrossing and thoughtful picture, beautifully rendered in an artful mode of realism.
  77. The first masterpiece of 2008 -- at least by American release date standards -- the latest film from master French director Jacques Rivette is a masterful, multilayered, sometimes enigmatic work of dark irony, an assured tragicomedy of manners and more.
  78. A giddy kick-out-the-jams entertainment. Diary takes a tack that's not exactly new, but is new to Romero, and as one might expect, the director brings a sharp and uncompromising new perspective to it.
  79. This is not a children's picture, although it touches on the imaginative powers and emotional resilience of children. It's another slice of Hou's distinctly poetic realism, and as such, also a kind of tribute to Paris -- the Paris of both today and of the older film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Quantum, thanks to a deft blend of exotic escapism and bare-bones modernism, is more than strong enough to be judged on its own. In fact, it's the perfect Bond film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The whole thing works, especially for the non-comic audience. Plus, the music is perfect, especially the opening montage set to Bob Dylan's, "The Times They Are a-Changin."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    To call Towelhead exploitative is to miss the point. What made Towelhead the novel so extraordinary was the honesty in Jasira's adolescent narrative voice, the genuine way she misguidedly, but honestly, conflates the sexual attention she receives with the parental affection she really needs. With the film, Ball, though he drops the book's first person narration, is faithful to that voice.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A totally mesmerizing battle of the wills between the occasionally charming yet wily Nixon and the increasingly desperate Frost.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Masterfully put together.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Winslet deserves an Oscar for her amazing performance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Naturally, Pitt and Blanchett are outstanding. Fincher's meticulous attention to detail is unerring, down to the light fixtures.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Rourke is getting tons of press and award nominations, but Marisa Tomei kicks ass too. Not only does the one-time Oscar winner look amazing and perform her own pole tricks, but she effectively humanizes what could be just another naked chick in a movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a smart script. There is a wealth of twists, but none of them have to beat you over the head.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a movie where you WANT to stick around for the credits. The beauty is that you are totally set up for it, and you don't mind one bit. That final sequence ties the movie together in an awesome fashion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Much like the actual summer (the season, not the character), we never wanted it to end.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is, simply put, one of the most beautiful movies you’ll ever see.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Just like the final performance by its deeply disturbed heroine, Black Swan is perfect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Each new plot point in Suddenly occurs like the title says, but the passage between them is slow, steady, and sure.
  80. A truly remarkable and compassionate debut from a savvy, self-confident filmmaker. No bull.
  81. Jarecki does a remarkable job with this easily exploitable material.
  82. One of the things that makes this movie such a great rush is that while you’re watching it, it seems a good deal more subversive than it really is.
  83. In the annals of Mediterranean island love stories, Respiro reflects the effortless charm of a film like "Il Postino," rather than the untidy manufactured romance of another "Captain Corelli's Mandolin."
  84. Bardem plays the part with all the pent-up animal rage of a young Robert De Niro.
  85. A brilliant little exercise. As a horror movie, it packs one genuine scare after another, right up to the moment of its inconceivably ghastly end. As a mystery, it unfolds with an almost supernatural elegance. And as a metaphor for the movies themselves, it's truly exceptional.
  86. Fun, fun, fun. [July/Aug 2003, p.26]
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  87. The genuine article, a hard-core horror picture from start to finish... Prepare to get seriously stresed.
  88. Terrifically charming and energetic film.
  89. In this sequel, as Elle uses her good-hearted pluck to work toward her goal, Witherspoon is a sheer delight, all charm and light and loveliness; you just want her to win.
  90. It’s a 21st-century version of "The Sting" for these so far rather unkind and ungentle times.
  91. An unexpectedly exuberant, only mildly subversive celebration of music, learning, and going all out for what you love.
  92. Against very steep odds, writer-director Billy Ray and company have, in telling the real-life story of fictionalizing "New Republic" writer Stephen Glass and his downfall, produced the most entertaining inside-journalism movie since "All the President's Men."
  93. While Bartley and O'Briain flat-out lucked out with this felicitous endeavor, their fearlessness, unobtrusive narration, and lack of Michael Moore man-and-microphone pandering is to be saluted.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Weir consistently proves that he can take any kind of material and adeptly make it his own.
  94. Resurrection is a revelation.
  95. At its most simplified, Sucker punches its way to the top of the Italian-western mountains, but never reaches the peak of its immortalized trilogy brethren.
  96. Ben Kingsley and Jennifer Connelly create characters that live and seethe with absolute credibility, and Ron Eldard’s Lester is a subtle portrait of a good man who lets himself go bad, first out of boredom, then out of erotic fixation.
  97. In the end, it's not the answer to the kitchen mystery that matters but the revelation that there's ultimately no difference between this bachelor scientist and his bachelor subject.
  98. Reveals more about the German people through sentimental comedy than such overtly political films as "The Nasty Girl" or "The Marriage of Maria Braun."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A model of economic storytelling....It raised the bar for movie action to a bionic level. [1 Dec 2003, p.13]
    • Premiere
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Duvall delivers a bravura, Oscar-quality performance....The Apostle is a profoundly humane movie that crackles with the joy and sorrow of an old blues record.
    • Premiere
  99. Beautiful, lyrical, but not in the least bit wimpy. [May 2004, p. 18]
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  100. Think of how M. Night Shyamalan redefined the ghost story (The Sixth Sense), the superhero creation myth (Unbreakable), and the alien-invasion epic (Signs)--and you may get a sense of the genius behind this fascinating new horror film.
  101. Nearly perfect in its own cotton-candy way.
  102. By the end the movie has pretty much ceased taking itself at all seriously, devolving into a nonchalant giggliness of the stoned variety that's completely apropos.
  103. The mood never droops, however, saved by Mario’s well-studied ability to channel his father, a performance as delicately nuanced and polished as the film is frenetic and raw.
  104. Take it from someone who can still feel the hollow rubber tang! of old dodgeball scars: It feels great to be blindsided by a little movie like this.
  105. In his first feature, director Joshua Marston passes no judgments. He doesn't condemn drugs. He merely depicts the system that has arisen to support this illicit trade.
  106. Open Water may not be a pristine or complex suspense thriller, but you'd be hard-pressed to find anything else as terrifyingly potent in such a tiny package.
  107. Conran's Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow is a pastiche of everything from "King Kong" to "The Wizard of Oz," a movie that escalates to a breathless cliff-hanger every 20 minutes or so and reinvents itself with every reel.
  108. Whatever you want to label this quick-paced crowd-pleaser, it is definitely one of the year's must-sees.
  109. Refusing to dumb down for a mass market, Primer is "Mullholland Dr." for math geeks, "Memento" for mad geniuses, or simply one of the most inventive films ever made for pennies on the Hollywood dollar.
  110. There are moments so beautifully composed and so resonant in Jonathan Glazer's (Sexy Beast) sophomore effort, I can at least propose it's a "near-great."
  111. Those who aren't inclined to lambaste will surely have some stimulating conversations after the film is over.
  112. An enchantingly cryptic, ethereally photographed slice of somber surrealism that should definitely appeal to fans of David Lynch and Luis Buñuel.
  113. An epic treatment of epic themes that doesn't soft-soap its audience, but at the same time provides a terrifically satisfying entertainment.
  114. So breathtaking is the action.
  115. Preaches post-9/11 family values to conservatives while appeasing liberals with ideas of tolerance and social activism.
  116. By turns harrowing and stirring, it’s a shame-inducing history lesson that never feels like a lecture.
  117. The brilliant subtleties of this absorbing, must-see drama are best seen through Penn, who transforms a strongly nuanced script into the greatest performance of the year.
  118. Most likely chosen for its shaggy-dog looks, Winn-Dixie is actually a great deal more special than you'd expect, a fitting analogy for a film no parent should be too quick to dismiss.
  119. Once the picture gets into Hollywood's bloodstream, it could well prove to be as influential as John Woo's 1989 crime thriller, "The Killer."
  120. A rough-and-tumble magnum opus of digital filmmaking that thrillingly basks in the sick, slick, sexy and quick-witted excesses of its imaginatively mutant stylizations.
  121. Guaranteed to deliver more innovative eye candy and smarter fun-per-second than most of this summer's fare, and that one-two punch ought to knock you off your seat.
  122. Once Palpatine's machinations set the cogs in motion for the creation of Vader, and the Clone Wars start getting bloody, Sith commences to cook in a way that no Star Wars movie has since "Empire."
  123. Murderball asks you to put all your assumptions about quadriplegics aside and start over.
  124. That rare kind of movie that contrasts "cultured" big-city characters with devout, "simple" folk without being condescending or judgmental of either camp.
  125. This is not a perfect picture, but it’s a soulful one that offers a lot of pleasure and even a kind of wisdom.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Even in the service of silliness, no one plays tragic, desperate, and beautiful better than Keener, who together with Carell, makes this film both laugh out loud funny and humane.
  126. Catherine Keener is remarkably subtle and soulful as Capote's friend and helpmeet Harper Lee, who delivers a shocking verdict against him at the end, but the movie, as you probably will not be surprised to learn, is owned by Philip Seymour Hoffman.
  127. David Strathairn, playing Murrow, follows his writers' lead beautifully, delivering a performance that's all understatement on the surface and searing fire underneath.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The Family Stone may not be super-serious or even, well, sly, but none of that matters: this is a warm and engaging film that is sure to become a perennial Christmas favorite.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's a role that essentially demystifies Brosnan's star persona, and in it he is simply sensational, funnier and more persuasively neurotic than even a devoted fan might expect.
  128. Woody's a master wordsmith, and here he's crafted a bit of audience-friendly fare that's smart without feeling exclusionary. It's a portrait of elite society--and the hangers-on who wish to penetrate it--made in an surprisingly accessible way.
  129. The movie biz inside jokes eventually yield to fairly merciless plumbings about the construction of the self, resulting in a kind of philosophical discomfort that's much different from the run-of-the-mill humiliations this sort of thing usually trucks in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    With its varied close-ups and wide shots of the performers and a series of interviews with several of the musicians as they prepare to perform, Heart of Gold is a traditional concert film. But a traditional concert film starring Neil Young brings a layer of emotion to the medium that's rarely seen.
  130. The movie belongs to Wood, who creates a unique portrait of a girl hesitating at the threshold of womanhood; she's smarter, more attuned, and more spiritually ambitious than those around her, but also too decent and loyal to break from the world she knows-and too unformed to have a grasp of what she wants outside of that world. It's fantastic work.
  131. What the film lacks in freshness, it makes up for in great characters, fun vocal performances, and a script with some genuine emotional heft.
  132. As for this film's esteemed director, I don't remember getting such sheer pleasure out of an Altman movie since . . . hmm, lemme look at the filmo . . . hmm—"The Player"? Not so much . . . "O.C. and Stiggs"? I wish . . . Um, "Popeye"? More likely, but . . . Ah-"A Wedding." Yeah, that’s it, "A Wedding." Whoa. That was, like, almost 30 years ago.
  133. But after surveying pop and rock hybrids, Akin and Hacke go deeper. You will be very happy indeed to make the acquaintance of such Turkish music luminaries as Orhan Gencebay and Sezen Aksu, whose stories and personalities are as fascinating as their music.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Smaller kids might find the movie too intense at times, especially when DJ, Chowder, and Jenny find themselves literally in the belly of the beast. But everyone else should enjoy a good, goosebumpy scare.
  134. On the surface, each of these characters fits a familiar Latino stereotype--teen harlot, "el bandido" and male buffoon--yet the movie insists on giving each person dimension.
  135. Why is this movie so watchable? Four simple reasons. It's truly funny. It's truly scary. It's truly gruesome. And Samuel L. Jackson is the cool head who prevails (“You stick with me, you live”).
  136. While I have no problem enthusiastically recommending writer-director Nicolas Winding Refn's Pusher trilogy, I'd also heartily discourage all but the most rabid crime-movie nuts from consuming the whole thing in one afternoon or evening.
  137. It's not likely you'll see a film more visually exhilarating until, well, Gondry's next.
  138. The Queen is a surprisingly compassionate portrait (excepting Blair's reactionary wife with the "shallow curtsy") of a rigid pragmatist in denial over the monarchy's out-of-touch dysfunction.
  139. A conventional but genuinely heartrending exposé of the Indiana boy who grew to be a powerful religious cult leader, director Stanley Nelson's thoroughly researched doc is not a posthumous character assassination, which would be all too easy and unnecessary.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Each scene is lovingly crafted, with bright colors and the beautiful scenery of La Mancha, the mellifluous cadences of Castilian Spanish, and of course the faces, young and old, of each actress.
  140. Under the clichéd spell of rock-and-roll promiscuity and pills popped, Seigner shows astonishing range as the detached superstar who still fixates on her ex-boyfriend and has mood swings like a manic-depressive on fast-forward.
  141. This critic found much to digest (pun barely intended), with thoughts of FDA politics and standard practices, the ritualism and sacrifice of our own species, why baby animals are considered protectable innocents (and inversely, grown steaks-to-be just a fact of life), plus, on a meta level, how people's dietary philosophies will inform their reactions to the work.
  142. von Donnersmarck delivers something extraordinary and rare: a thriller that's entirely adult in both its concerns and perspective which manages to be as thoroughly gripping as any finely tuned albeit adolescent Hollywood nail-biter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The Holiday is the type of welcome diversion that only Meyers still seems to specialize -- a romantic comedy where Barbara Stanwyck and Rosalind Russell would have been just as natural as Cameron Diaz and Kate Winslet and where the one liners fly like confetti.
  143. Not that Diamond skimps on the social commentary; far from it. But it makes its points without too much breast-beating, caching its polemic within a tough-minded entertainment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The reason to see Dreamgirls is what hasn't been advertised - a film that in spite of its shiny veneer actually hits all the high notes through its underlying rawness.
  144. If The Painted Veil ultimately lacks some of the novelty and ambition of the year's best pictures, it still ranks as one of 2006's quiet gems.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's the rare sci-fi film that transcends its genre with its ideas, able to sweep one up in its not-too-distant future and yet remain remarkably prescient about the present day.
  145. Marker's even-handedness and playful spirit tries to show that innocent art and activist politics are two sides of the same culture, even if deviant government duplicity threatens the balance between them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Dark little indie thriller.
  146. Mafioso isn't a straight black satire of Sicilian culture so much as a suspenseful near-tragedy leavened by the zesty, irreverent wit that helped define the golden age of Italian comedies.
  147. It makes for a daringly different kind of thriller -- cerebral, meticulous, haunting.
  148. When the movie isn't being scary, it's crazily funny, so much so that critical watchers will wonder if Bong might tilt the balance of the picture too far in a comic direction and water down the scares. He doesn't.
  149. A thoroughly engaging, terrifically moving family story that's rich in beautifully observed and lovingly conveyed human detail.
  150. The masterly Panahi concocts a spellbinding, often corrosively and/or warmly funny story in which love of both country and sport tries to, but doesn't quite, transcend dogmatic and ingrained difference.
  151. As much as I enjoyed much of it, I hope Grindhouse doesn't start any trends. Exploitation cinema is combustible stuff that only highly trained professionals should be permitted to play with.
  152. Rock the Bells doesn't just delve behind the scenes; it makes a showstopping guest-MC out of each crazy new obstacle.
  153. Once may not boast stellar production values or elaborate dance numbers, but in its own scruffy way it captures the spirit of the genre better than any recent Hollywood musical.
  154. The result is a kind of very faux documentary style, which, along with the subject matter, has suggested to some the influence of the BBC television series "The Office." Von Trier says he's never seen an episode, and I believe him.
  155. Paprika ain't no kiddie 'toon, even if its thumpin' techno-pop and bubble-gum thrills have the same splashy palette as an episode of "Pokémon" or "Dragon Ball Z."
  156. This is filmmaking that's as rousing as it is strange.
  157. If this is in fact merely a longer Simpsons episode, it's a damn good Simpsons episode.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This Is England may be best summed up as a "coming-of-age" story that puts aside the clichéd baggage often carried by the description and ultimately ends up being moving, genuinely funny, thought-provoking, and highly recommended.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    As fate would have it, Rocket Science might prove to be the handiwork of a burgeoning cinematic genius.
  158. Where Dans Paris truly pops, besides its spot-on leads or the slick curation of its fashions and locales, are in its mood-mixing musical moments.
  159. As forceful as its title suggests, and sometimes unbelievably ballsy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If you don't play at all, you may find yourself enjoying this film more than anyone, because you'll at least get all the laughs with none of the cringing self-recognition.
  160. Exiled brings To back to lighter ground, and it’s one of his most assured, enjoyable pictures, refreshing fun that’s sure to satisfy anyone’s action jones.
  161. An intense New York-set thriller that manages to be both commercial and contemplative, kick-ass and quietly, disturbingly insinuating.
  162. A richly drawn, ambitious character piece both socially relevant and genuinely suspenseful.
  163. Proceeds at a very stately pace, hoping the otherworldly mood of its detailed recreation of the old West might seep into the viewer's bones. This viewer did, as it happens, fall under the film's spell.
  164. The action is violent, messy, and threaded through with dark humor. This is a movie for grownups, for sure, but it has a mulish kick that most such pictures consider themselves to tasteful to aspire to.
  165. A smart, sweet, and thoroughly disarming ensemble comedy that isn't afraid to wear its humanism on its sleeve.
  166. Lars's attraction to Bianca is like an audience's to an actor onscreen -- the object is fake, an approximation, but for some that's better than flesh and blood. Bianca is a work of art. And so is Lars and the Real Girl.
  167. Haynes's picture may not be perfect -- hell, I'm not even sure that perfection is a state it even aspires to -- but it's bold and individualistic and accomplished. A reason to take heart for the state of current American moviemaking.
  168. I generally resist calling any actor's work "brave" or "fearless" or any such thing, but Bosco's work here made me reconsider that self-imposed ban. It's incredible, harrowing, precise stuff.
  169. Margot is a fleet, strangely enjoyable film, animated by the acuity of Baumbach's perceptions and -- this helps a lot -- the frequent laugh-out-loud wit of his dialogue.
  170. It's terribly strong -- in structural ingenuity, emotional pull, and particularly visual beauty.
  171. All of these actors are incredibly fine, and as a confirmed Beckinsale non-fan, I'm obliged to say that she really knocked me out here.
  172. This is very much a French intellectual cineaste's idea of a B thriller, and hence is as far from innocent in its genre as you can get. Which is not to say that Assayas deals in bad faith.
  173. It's distinctly Morrisean, as it were, and seeing his style applied to subject matter with which one is already somewhat familiar makes one... well, question the style a bit.
  174. The Fall is a movie whose every frame pulsates with the desire to be a transportive, transcendent work of cinema. And each one of said frames is full of visual bedazzlement and wonder. So full that one is loathe to sum up with the phrase "Close, but no cigar." But there is something, finally, kind of pushy about the film's desire to be a masterpiece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    From Downey Jr.'s purposely racist embodiment of African-American anachronisms to Black's scatological humor, everything in Tropic Thunder qualifies as satire, not spoof. It's an important distinction. Pauline Kael once noted that "unlike satire, spoofing has no serious objectives; it doesn't attack anything that anyone could take seriously; it has no cleansing power."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is one train that you shouldn't miss.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The perfect antidote to the post-holiday blues. It's exciting, well-acted, touching, and genuine.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A remarkable and disturbing look at the personal stories glossed over by the headlines.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Sally Hawkins offers an Oscar-worthy performance as Poppy, the funny, kind-hearted, and mischievous protagonist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    At turns as neurotic and nebbishy as any Woody Allen flick, as creepy and disorienting as your favorite "Twilight Zone" episode, and as steeped in magical realism as the most moving Márquez novel, Synecdoche may not be the feel-good date movie of the year. But for viewers up for the challenge, it may be the film most likely to stick with you.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Sometimes the only funny stuff is in the trailers, but not so here. Kristen Johnson was especially adept at stealing some scenes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The beginning is a little slow, but after Neeson starts his hunt and does his best wrath-of-God impression, it doesn’t skip a beat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The story is creepy fun and 100-percent different than whatever other crap is flooding the February market.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ginnifer Goodwin gives a standout performance--and that’s saying a lot considering the large cast--as the insecure, neurotic female looking for love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This movie was absolutely hilarious, and proved that dating might be easy, but making friends is much harder.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
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    Each character has their own story, and Pixar never sacrifices their development just for a happy ending.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    We actually had the urge to dodge the sea snakes swimming right at us.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    You might not bust a gut laughing, but Malkovich’s performance alone is worth the 90-minutes required to watch it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    On the surface, this might look like a typical teen movie, but Adventureland’s talented cast perfectly portrays the self-loathing and strong-minded characters in that transient post-college stage of life.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A great-looking and smart film. It has enough action, wonder, depth, and action to keep any fan of the genre happy. The sociological undertones here are fascinating as well.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The credits may be silly, but the last scene is a definite tear-jerker.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Why John Cusack stopped doing this kind of movie remains one of the late-20th century’s great mysteries. Teaming him with contemporary comic vanguards Corrdry and Robinson is equal parts welcome and unexpected as the three relive the social, sexual, and Soviet fears of the era.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    We were also glad to see they didn't ignore the humorous elements that made the original so great. Plus, the casting is spot on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Inception is one of the best sci-fi movies of the new century, a mind-bender about dreams as public spaces.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's the kind of smart, stylish, entertaining and grown-up movie that the studios are making less and less of these days.

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