Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 5,586 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Random Access Memories
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
5,586 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Assured and dignified. [May 2002, p.119]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wicked Grin is a bona fide revelation.... A rambunctious joy from beginning to end.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is music that exerts as much effortless cool as young pups The Strokes. [Oct 2001, p.118]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another triumph, brimming with soulful, languid grooves, deft samples and well-chosen guest singers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Slick samples and buoyant melodies are in, dissonant atmospherics pretty much out. [Feb 2002, p.111]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album of rich, subtle melodies, championship-level guitar playing and lyrical depth. [Sep 2002, p.115]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the tender slow rollers that really clinch this supreme collection. [#180, p.97]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The W is largely a return to murky idiosyncratic form after 1997's filler-bloated Wu-Tang Forever. Weighing in at a svelte 60 minutes, it plays to the group?s main strengths: brutal hooks and scary ambience.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, as resonant and dignified a covers album as you'll ever hear.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a quietly adventurous coming of age, as languorous and fuzzy around the edges as a summer afternoon.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Highly charged without being mawkish. [July 2002, p.115]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As radio-friendly as Radiohead are not. [Sep 2001, p.120]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seal The Deal opens with a rollicking piano intro that's longer than the rest of the song, guitars are abandoned in favour of exhilarating keyboard riffs, and the background use of birdsong and bagpipes is commonplace in Quasi's world. And it's a better place for it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They've crucially learned that musical light and shade need not only be flaring explosions, but melodic sunrises too. [Jul 2003, p.109]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They retained their best ideas for themselves though, since their debut album is striking escape from mere genre. [Review of UK version]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A haunting, left-field album of some class. [Jun 2003, p.96]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though rockier in parts than any of his previous work, this 12-track set houses some of Johnson's most impressive songwriting to date.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Why didn't they just call it Supernatural II and have done with it? [Dec 2002, p.110]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's full of clever rhymes and couplets, overflowing with wit and evocative charm, all set to the kind of arrangements that Harry Nilsson always dreamed of. [Aug 2001, p.142]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brooding collection. [May 2004, p.108]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    i
    A proper treat for aficionados of the laugh-out-loud lyric. [May 2004, p.106]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's '80s synth-pop in spirit rather than form, miles away from the make-up clad silliness of electroclash and much more interested in muching about with present day technology than simply recreating the past. [Jun 2004, p.98]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stepping outside of their natural environment ensured their longevity in the '90s, stepping back in seems to have given them a fresh boost. For all Zooropa and Pop's pushing of the envelope, limiting themselves to rock's core ingredients has given the band a new challenge. Certainly, not since The Joshua Tree have U2 sounded so like U2 but, with songs of this startling calibre, right now being U2 is no bad thing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her aching sincerity’s another major plus; that she can get away with Caged Bird’s Stevie Wonder-isms and Fallin’s near plagiarism of James Brown’s It’s A Man’s World speaks volumes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For sheer bravado and imagination it's something that few bands will top this year. [Oct 2003, p.109]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Matches Slipknot for manic intensity while employing a freeform approach to songcraft which invites comparison to the lunatic-fringe rock of the late '60s. [Sep 2001, p.122]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Singer Pat Monahan has a Michael Stipe-esque voice: part whine part sneer, but with an added dollop of believeable pathos. On this second album, his four colleagues concoct intriguing backdrops... [#180, p.112]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ash have turned in a bullish and cocksure fifth studio album to delight the faithful. [Jun 2004, p.95]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His best work in many a long year. [Jun 2004, p.105]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dre and Big Boi (alias Andre Benjamin and Antwan Patton) fill their technicolour vision with the ghosts of Sly Stone, James Brown and, most notably, Funkadelic-era George Clinton. Factor in some distinctly unorthodox production and you've rap at its risk-taking best...