San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 909 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Pushing Daisies: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Moonlight: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 483
  2. Negative: 0 out of 483
483 tv reviews
  1. There is more than enough to captivate us, and perhaps disturb us as well, in these eight stunningly provocative episodes.
  2. There is a brilliant mix of poignancy and hilarity in Getting On, which is why it all works so well.
  3. The animation, overseen by art director James McDermott, is fresh, colorful and as wacky as the script.
  4. The period details are exquisite, aside from a couple of stray modernisms that wander into the dialogue here and there.... But the brilliance of the series is the balancing act of the scripts, by Darabont and Buntin, executed with astonishing precision between the past and the modern version of the past.
  5. Lapine's direction is almost the star of Six by Sondheim. Not only has he used the six songs to illuminate the composer's life, he organizes years and years of interviews as if they are an ongoing conversation--which, in many ways, they are. They are the monograph of the life and art of a singular man, perfectly assembled, bit by bit, piece by piece.
  6. The dialogue is rich, colorful and provocative, adding to the gothic sensibilities of the series. Director Cary Joji Fukunaga makes great use of the Louisiana location, giving it as much importance to the story as the characters of Cohle and Hart. All the performances are superb, but those of McConaughey and Harrelson are in a class by themselves.
  7. Klondike grabs you with terrific performances, an unusually rich script, magnificently sweeping visuals of jagged mountains overlooking valleys of ice and snow, and such a convincing attention to period detail, you'll believe you're back in Dawson City at the end of the 19th century.
  8. The performances are even better than in previous years, with brand new but fully credible sides of Holmes’ and Watson’s characters. And the writing, by Moffat and Gatiss, is in a league by itself.
  9. The sweep of Rescue Me is far-reaching, and it's fearless in trying to break new ground in an old genre.
  10. But this is what a great TV series does -- it mines difficult emotional ground. It's willfully complex, putting popularity at risk. It avoids convention and takes irregular dramatic steps. With that in mind, watch Rescue Me at your own risk.
  11. It never shrinks from the task of surpassing its own brilliance. Even when it fails in its attempt to knock you out, Rescue Me keeps swinging, and that engenders a whole lot of admiration in a medium choking on its own safety.
  12. Rescue Me may ask a lot of its viewers, but it's always a leap worth taking, and well rewarded. [13 June 2007, p.E1]
  13. As good as Rome is -- and it's an epic, multilayered thing of beauty -- it's still not on the level of "The Sopranos" or "The Wire" or "Deadwood." That's almost an unfair comparison, but it's also true. On the other hand, "Rome" unfolds like a marvelously shot big-screen movie, each scene (filmed on location in Italy) dripping with money well spent and a meticulous grandeur that rewards you for paying extra for HBO.
  14. All of the elements that made it must-see last year are working at full throttle in season two, which kicks off Wednesday night: intrigue, deception, sex, duplicity, spy vs. spy stuff and, most of all, irony.
  15. At least the first episode of the new Cosmos is terrific. And if the other 12 episodes are as good, the series will serve as a valuable continuation of Sagan's legacy.
  16. Every performance is terrific.... While these characters are written and performed as over the top, the show also celebrates the subtle underplaying that goes into making Big Head and Gilfoyle so memorable. That variety of tone is another way in which Silicon Valley sets itself apart from most other half-hour comedies.
  17. Game of Thrones isn't afraid of change: It's the lifeblood of the series, and just one of the reasons we keep watching.
  18. The writing, by Weiner, direction by Scott Hornbacher and performances are, of course, top notch.
  19. As good as it was last year, it's off to an even better start in its sophomore year.
  20. Yes, the show benefits from superb performances, from series regulars, as well as guest stars like Sarah Silverman and Victor Garber. But it's the writing that puts Louie on the highest possible level of comedy. There simply is no better-written comedy on TV today.
  21. Making a film is kind of a nightmare, but a riveting one. And Project Greenlight is in itself a riveting documentary. It's got a hero, it's got stars, it's got drama. In 12 parts, we'll find out if there's a happy ending.
  22. In the Flesh is of course a complex and thought-provoking allegory.
  23. It is emotionally raw, harrowing, and a thing of such singular horrific beauty, it will move you, exhaust you and, almost paradoxically, thrill you at the heights television drama can attain.
  24. Through the six episodes of the second season made available to critics, it's clear that Orange is not only as great as it was the first season, but arguably even better.... It's terrific.
  25. The writing is superb and painfully funny, while the cast is terrific.
  26. The series reflects the youth and intelligence of its writer and succeeds by quickly getting viewers past what would seem an insurmountable obstacle -- caring about what happens to rich white kids in Orange County.
  27. A very original, extremely well-acted and complexly written drama.
  28. A winning, extremely funny new sitcom.
  29. "Friday Night Lights" is not good. It's great.
  30. What helps separate "The Nine" from others in this season's crowded field are stellar performances throughout and a steady, sure hand in the pilot.

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