San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,273 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Enlightened: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 The Winner: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 696
  2. Negative: 0 out of 696
696 tv reviews
  1. Spoils Before Dying is funnier than “Babylon.” The earlier miniseries spoofed ’40s melodramas, but this year’s model takes a narrower approach, mining the staples of the even more formulaic noir films, capturing the excesses of the hard-boiled dialogue and pushing them just far enough over the edge to knock you out of your chair.
  2. With The Leftovers, we know very little and care less and less as the story slouches along.
  3. The pilot’s finale asks more questions than it answers, including who’s good and who’s up to no good in the scheme of things. The show probably would work better an hour earlier, but wherever NBC puts it, it’s worth finding.
  4. Raydor is cut from different cloth that her predecessor and that's going to take some getting used to.
  5. While [Will] Smith is an easy interview because of his star wattage and engaging personality, the conversation between the two men was just that. A conversation. The kind of conversational interview Johnny Carson used to do, where the host in genuinely interested in listening to his guest as well as being funny.
  6. Overcooked though it may be, Goliath (terrible title, by the way) is entertaining because Thornton knows how to effectively underplay overwritten dialogue.
  7. Wanting soap and dirt--a lot of dirt--he [creator Greg Berlanti] has fashioned something that's watchable only if you completely divorce it from the realm of credibility.
  8. Right out of the gate, the series is surprisingly solid. What it ultimately becomes bears watching.
  9. Occasional PSA breaks aside, Asylum is all in great and occasionally gory fun, and the cast members deliver the over-the-top dialogue with a heaping topping of relish.
  10. The dialogue is pretty unbelievable, like a few hundred Hallmark card greetings strung together over two hours.
  11. Regardless of the memories and anecdotes, what these films lack are commentators who can provide cultural context.
  12. Parham and St. Clair continue to play well off each other, but the writing is tighter this time around and the ensemble cast is better [than "Best Friends Forever"].
  13. This is a family show in the best meaning of the term.
  14. Most of the performances are superb, beginning with Tennant, of course. He is so well cast and skilled that he's able to sustain credibility despite some of the gaps in the script.
  15. Lie to Me comes out of the box strong, and it's especially encouraging that the cases at hand and the science used in the first hour is compelling enough that Roth's character (based on Paul Ekman, a real-life expert on lying and microexpressions, among other things) can evolve more slowly.
  16. It may be the nicest show you'll ever see.
  17. It has a goofy charm and outsize ridiculousness that wins you over -- even if you'd prefer more snark.
  18. Laden with laugh-out-loud moments. ... Just as "Curb Your Enthusiasm" so boldly and brilliantly attacks taboo subjects, so does "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," though the humor is spread from one clueless, self-centered ass to four, clueless, self-centered slackers. [4 Aug 2005]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  19. The slowdown of the show's pace is one thing, but the real issue here is that the family element often feels inauthentic and just isn't up to the quality of the CGI-fueled action sequences.
  20. The series gets better with each episode, and the characters become funnier and more interesting when you come to know (or pity) them along the way.
  21. The changes enhance the comic balance between the reality-based humor of a young couple coping with their new baby and their evaporating youth, and the "SNL"-sketch-like satire of a powerful and powerfully self-involved talk show hostess.
  22. "Love Monkey" manages in one hour to be both funny and endearing, a more option-rich version of "Ed."
  23. It's not very often that a TV show bursting with imagination, audacity, rude charm and a relentlessly funny worldview gets on the air, much less appears fully formed. But Sarah Silverman... has delivered an offbeat gem.
  24. [The Crazy Ones and The Michael J. Fox Show] have great, always likable stars heading up solid ensemble casts in well-written and mostly plausible shows. Who could ask for anything more?
  25. Just dreadful enough to want to shoot yourself and end up in the tender loving arms of the people at "Private Practice."
  26. All told, this series is pleasantly unexpected, taking chances on TNT when it seemed the channel's DNA wouldn't permit that level of risk. If the writing continues to hold up, viewers could be in for a better ride than the one Hunter is already taking them on by herself.
  27. The writers have calmed down a bit this season, but they still can't seem to resist the urge for over-the-top plot strings.
  28. Ferrell may never make Cooperstown, he’s a shoo-in for funniest guy in the US.
  29. The truth is, it takes a very big man to laugh at himself, and a very good actor to get us laughing along with him as well.
  30. The show obviously has a great cast, but they’re badly used.... These are not people you want to spend 22 minutes with every Tuesday night.

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