San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,277 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Roots (2016)
Lowest review score: 0 Beauty and the Beast (2012): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 699
  2. Negative: 0 out of 699
699 tv reviews
  1. Although Blick's structural concept skirts close to mannered gimmickry, it also makes artistic sense. We are slowly but unavoidably drawn into the ever thickening mire of secrets, lies and shifting allegiances in both the lives of the characters and, of course, in the constant strife in the Middle East.
  2. Not only are the first two episodes of the new season smart, edgy and funny as hell, but Falk also has moved the story forward in a way that makes logical sense and keeps things delightfully fresh and sassy.
  3. None of its quirky charm and tone-shifting mix of comedy and drama has lagged since we last witnessed Nancy's precarious situation.
  4. The first two episodes of Dallas 2.0, the TNT reboot of the classic nighttime soap, have all the fixin's for a juicy second season.
  5. Hollander more than succeeds in making Corkoran completely repulsive, despite the fact that the character is unwaveringly loyal and smart enough to realize Pine isn’t who he seems to be. That said, the role is offensively homophobic. ... Otherwise, The Night Manager is a class act, not only because of the care that has gone into the writing, direction and performances, but in the great respect the creators show to the quality of le Carré’s novel.
  6. Lange is always interesting, but she’s only occasionally convincing here as Crawford. The voice is too high, for one thing. Sarandon fares better, as much good as that does with such a lousy script.
  7. The writing and acting are hit out of the ballpark on this one, and that's not a vibe you pick up out of nowhere.
  8. Despite what we know about his troubled childhood, Fischer remains enigmatic.
  9. An eye-opener that’s also funny, real and compelling, the series is a heartwarming reminder that no matter who we are, we’re all born this way.
  10. Little Dorrit is anchored by an extraordinary performance by one of England's best actors. And like "Twist," that central performance is only one of many elements that make Dorrit not only terrific entertainment, but, in some ways, perhaps even better than its source material.
  11. All of this would be so much Hollywood melodrama were it not for a superb script and stunning performances by West and Carter.
  12. What helps separate "The Nine" from others in this season's crowded field are stellar performances throughout and a steady, sure hand in the pilot.
  13. Weight pulls no punches, spares neither the multibillion-dollar food and advertising industries nor public officials for not only failing to fix the problem but actually making it worse, and essentially writes a prescription for the nation's health and economic future that we ignore to our peril.
  14. Unfortunate Events is not only binge-worthy, it’s binge-demanding.
  15. The series isn’t perfect. To be honest, it drags a bit and seems repetitive, as though Rosenberg is stretching things out to increase audience tension. In fact, you’re likely to feel the opposite from time to time, a desire to say, “oh, get on with it.” But stick with it.
  16. One of the many virtues of Buirski's film is that it doesn't hit viewers over the head with the parallel between the Lovings' case and the debate over same-sex marriage. The parallel is simply there, to be identified and considered by the viewer.
  17. Schwartz's workmanlike film nonetheless gives us a detailed portrait of the man as well as the activist.
  18. Save for one far-fetched incident, the two hours provided enough clues as to where the season will head--and how much conflict from secrets and lies will be coming down the pike - to hook fans of the show who might have been waffling on the commitment.
  19. With a cast this big, though, and plots this complicated, it can be a challenge to keep up. Then again, if you're willing to do the work, it more than pays off.
  20. The Hour stands perfectly well on its own merits. It's so good that other shows should start looking to it as something to emulate.
  21. It's a serialized mystery that pays off your devotion.
  22. The humor is sly and more thoroughly integrated into the plot and characterizations than we’re used to in most sitcoms.... Six episodes just don’t seem enough.
  23. The real connection, as it were, among the six episodes is that they are all beautifully written, directed and performed. Taken either individually or together, they reflect aspects of contemporary life with care and attention to detail.
  24. Loss is the birthright of every life, and no one can refuse it. Yet we go on, buoyed by hope and love. Not exactly an original message, but it is one that Midwife delivers convincingly.
  25. The best news of all is that Olyphant backs it up with an incredibly riveting performance. Better yet, Justified as a whole really delivers, from the explosive pilot to a couple of other, less adrenaline-filled but no less superb episodes that add humor and nuanced storytelling to the mix.
  26. Generation Kill is rewarding in its complexity. It feels real - and that realness is bracing, sad and funny in equal measures.
  27. It's a wonderful series that gets better every hour you watch it. ... But there's the catch. "Deadwood" is a slow starter.
  28. The characterizations are carefully nuanced in Southland, and the performances are equal to the quality of writing.
  29. Nothing Left Unsaid offers great insight into the lives of its subjects, but its even greater achievement as a film is unanswered questions it provokes in its viewers.
  30. He holds forth telling wonderful stories about his childhood, about working as a "tummler" at Grossinger's, what it was like working with Sid Caesar and his enduring love for Gene Wilder, whose role in "Blazing Saddles" initially went to Gig Young, in between clips from too few of his many great films and TV work.

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