Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Ys
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2502 music reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He's right that the troubadour and his feeble attempt at greatness really are small potatoes in an indifferent universe, but at least his band can still manage to make albums worth a few spins.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What makes Poison Season a great album, though, is that it doesn't completely wallow in Bejar's newfound smoking-jacket-and-fine-brandy sophistication—as opposed to the tattered-plaid-shirt-and-fifth-of-Jack wildness of early Destroyer. Rather, refined balladry like "Solace's Bride" coexists comfortably next to upbeat, funky songs like "Midnight Meet the Rain," which sounds like the badass theme song for an '80s cop show.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With an uncanny melodic gift that enlivens even the most tired sentiments and a chameleonic ability to seamlessly transition between disparate production styles, Jepsen proves she's worthy of those comparisons [to Taylor Swift and Rihanna].
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    More than simply a joint stopgap for these indie heavyweights, Sing Into My Mouth serves, like the DJ-Kicks and LateNightTales series, as a musical bibliography for curious fans, and a superbly entertaining one at that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Depression Cherry's flabby midsection finds Beach House similarly situated: treading repeatedly over the same ground, yielding diminishing returns.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Love Is Free feels comparatively tossed off, merely a bridge between Robyn 2.0 and an incarnation of the dance-pop icon we--and she--haven't yet imagined.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yo La Tengo manages to further their transparency and place the focus even more on the material, faking their way through another series of delicately adjusted, quietly exquisite reinterpretations.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Call it a low-stakes play, but Another One is a snapshot of an artist who's found his lane and continues to mine it for affecting, melodically spry material.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its, well, sturm und drang, the bulk of Lamb of God's latest is pretty formulaic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although Currents is, in many ways, a showcase of difference (from his previous guitar-driven efforts, from some previous influences, even from other recently successful forays into disco-pop such as Daft Punk's Random Access Memories), Parker also toys with repetition as a unifying theme, sonically and lyrically.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Turns out Wilco are still full of surprises.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Born in the Echoes is frontloaded with star power, and so it comes as a slowly dawning relief that that album isn't the Chems' Random Access Memories, but rather an attempt to strip away the detritus of the now and play to their own strengths.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Isbell's follow-up, Something More Than Free, retains Southeastern's intimate acoustic-based feel and heavyhearted lyrical matter, but it's even more smooth-edged and lacks the emotional gut-punches of its predecessor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A more sonically focused effort.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's too bad the songwriting doesn't match the ambition.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    D'Angelo may have struck a new gold standard for intellectual R&B, and even recorded a more traditionally cohesive and satisfying album, but Miguel's cocktail of furious angst, pained perplexity, and damaged tenderness is just as relevant, acknowledging the complicated realities of modern sexuality while pushing to expand its horizons.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's never quite a tour de force, but as a union of the Orb's heady roots with their spiritual ascendants' minimalist ethos, the album is a consistently satisfying groove machine, and a worthy entry to the upper ranks of the Orb canon.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Deja Vu reminds the listener of something, all right: every other song currently playing, as Donna Summer once sang, on the radio.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Her music is as rooted in organic country and western traditions as ever, flush with cosmopolitan strings, instrumental banjo breaks, and generous portions of pedal steel, but the songwriting comes less organically, too often stretching itself thin over a genre that's historically benefited from a measure of simplicity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With no one on hand to quell his worst impulses, Young has gone preachy to the extreme, creating music that's morally precise, but sloppy in every other regard.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There may not be many surprises musically on Ten Songs, but it's surprising enough that Adams has let the façade down and finally let us hear his music in its purest form.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Occasionally, the more ambitious nature of Everything Is 4 reveals some of Derulo's weaknesses, like his insistence on indulging straight R&B (which feels basic compared to the unique mode of genre-bending he usually works in), but stretching musically also leads to arguably the most exciting moment here, the funk rave-up of album-closer "X2CU."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kozelek veers between wry, pissed-off, and ruminative expression without ever really settling on any of those. While that means Universal Themes never reaches the same highs as Benji, it does allow the listener to become fully immersed inside Kozelek's head, which is an alternately terrifying and hilarious place to be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His winking in-jokes and one-liners might have gotten the Internet's attention, but Ratchet wins you over when it reveals that this smart-aleck's got a beating heart too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Absent the lightning-in-a-bottle voltage of their heyday, Faith No More's Sol Invictus is shockingly no more than adequate.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Matsson might be offering another round of familiar sounds on Dark Bird Is Home, however impeccably arranged and played. The darkness and ambivalence that haunt its shadows, however, give the album depth and longevity well beyond its something-for-everyone first impression.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Why Make Sense? is the electronic fivesome's characteristically polished, generously tuneful tribute to wearing your heart on your sleeve.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Had she toned down some idiosyncrasies and worried a handful of these songs past what sounds like their draft stages, I Can't Imagine could've been a real coup for Lynne.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fly International Luxurious Art maintains some level of general interest through a stacked guest list, with visitors as varied as Snoop Dogg, A$AP Rocky, Busta Rhymes, and 2 Chains, but none of them do more than distract from the overall atmosphere of paltry unevenness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Fated is limited in scope, frustratingly laconic, and--as befits a journeyman--somewhat derivative, but it's never boring.