Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,927 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Laurence Anyways
Lowest review score: 0 The Darkest Hour
Score distribution:
2,927 movie reviews
  1. A delicate documentary about a way of life that's slowly disappearing, yet gives way to nothing new.
  2. A visual pleasure, and refreshingly free of message or structure, but it leaves an aftertaste similar to that of an awkward party spent among intellectuals.
  3. The trust that Bulletproof's filmmakers have in their cast and their talent is humanely and succinctly illustrated throughout.
  4. This is a study of a man who's hard to like, harder to dismiss, and impossible to pigeonhole.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The images, while beautiful, are sentimental, as if Kleber Mendonça Filho is trying to negotiate too much.
  5. Kirby Dick's films don't go far enough in explaining how a culture of rape can pervade in vastly different institutions, but they're ruthless about holding them accountable.
  6. By reducing its principals to stock figures in an extended chess game, it ends up providing steady, neatly staged thrills, but little else of substance.
  7. One watches the film with an escalating sense of disbelief and horror, as Warren Jeffs is steadily revealed to be an even greater monster than we initially take him for.
  8. The film shrewdly opts not to proffer its own hypothesis about the true reasons behind the Gibson family buying Frédéric Bourdin's story.
  9. A good story, full of life and related with intelligence and a sense of humor.
  10. What emerges is a portrait of a fully committed band that could never quite make it and of the rock n' roll project as something between a (very serious) hobby and a full-time career.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One may feel dissatisfied by the 11th-hour turn toward lyrical fatalism, and mildly insulted by the presumptuous attitude it seems to choose as it sends us on our way.
  11. The film thrives on ambiguity, keeping all things blurry outside its main character's focused perspective, its myopia sustained by Luminița Gheorghiu's tough, quietly intense performance.
  12. A stunning work of war reportage nestled within a creaky study of ideological purity.
  13. Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville reinforce the very circumstances they outwardly condemn.
  14. Deceptively modest on nearly all accounts, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's Caesar Must Die employs seemingly minor directorial contrivances to ruminate on a unique quarrel.
  15. As depicted by Jia Zhang-ke, the balance between the spoils and moral rot of murder are far preferable to the debasing rigors of tradition and hollow nationalism.
  16. The film's inquiry into the artistic method remains somewhat at the superficial level, but the directors do a fine job of emphasizing both the circumstances that lead to the music's creation and the satisfying result of the irrepressible sounds.
  17. The end results are mixed but nevertheless scintillating and provocative enough to be worth taking seriously.
  18. Each of the six vignettes that make up this unusually energetic anthology pertains to the methods of calculated mass dehumanization that are (barely) hidden beneath the practices of social institutions.
  19. The film is made impetuously watchable and disarmingly emotional by the filmmakers' strong command of docudrama and nonfiction narrative style.
  20. The mixture of different techniques and varied views results in a rich, multi-faceted look at one of America's most misguided policy initiatives.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Slowly, the powerful message of heart and soul winning out over an impaired body and over-thinking mind develops into the core drama of this otherwise modest doc.
  21. The stillness and silence with which we look upon Jake Williams ranges from curious to unnerving to fascinating.
  22. In its stripped-down realism and blistering fixation on its main character's grappling with life and mortality, the film is kin to Roberto Rossellini's collaborations with Ingrid Bergman.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    It pays to consider even the small details of society's greatest investment in the future: our future generations.
  23. The filmmakers are more interested in questioning what brings people to commit senseless and merciless acts than they are preoccupied with the historical record.
  24. A barbed inquiry into this particular notion of "self-defense," enabled by the quotidian racism state and perpetuated de jure by the state.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Plays out as a city-mouse rejoinder to the rustic, open-air daydream of Certified Copy, a snarl of thorny free jazz to that film's graceful aria.
  25. Even as an "18 months later" epilogue ensures us that everything's hunky dory, this is one surprisingly grim celebration of a group Rapaport obviously loves.

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