Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,204 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Lowest review score: 0 Rites of Spring
Score distribution:
2,204 movie reviews
  1. A slick, entertaining offering, playing at times like a tarted up "E! True Hollywood Story."
  2. David Siegel and Scott McGehee's film renders the rhapsodic Henry James novel of the same name into an abhorrent slice of tasteless familial drama.
  3. Alice Winocour's take on this true story carries the superficial trappings of a period drama, but its perspective is entirely contemporary.
  4. Tim Burton's sense of playfulness feels forced throughout, and as the film progresses, any humor or inventiveness takes a backseat to tumultuous set pieces that reference Frankenstein.
  5. Hovering over the narrative is the fear of the domino effect that change can enact, the dread that one person's "queerness" may perhaps expose everyone else's.
  6. Rather than bringing out the symbolic inner lives of the characters, these sequences seem like the intrusion of an aggressive authorial personality on a film whose subject-as well as the fact of Har'el's outsider status-demands that the filmmaker simply sit back and observe.
  7. It only conveys the awesome strangeness of its characters and their universe when director Brian Singer breaks away from the perpetual build-up of the film's unwieldy plot.
  8. Alejandro Landes's Porfirio is an ugly movie to watch, but it's not without purpose.
  9. Polisse has been compared to "The Wire," but beyond a shared interest in the Sisyphean nature of police work, the two are mostly comparable as inverses of each other.
  10. Fake It So Real has been made with considerable more polish than other do-it-yourself documentaries such as "Total Badass," but the sensibility is similar.
  11. The documentary not only humanizes Ingmar Bergman as the absent lover-cum-father of everyday life, but works as a priceless oral history of cinema.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The documentary revels in the simple joys of finding something that captures the eye and paying attention to it.
  12. A movie which sits at the nexus between spoken and written language, the latter mostly of the programming variety.
  13. Tomboy is one of those little big films whose simplicity and concision suggest the excess of meaning that language (cinematic or otherwise) could never account for.
  14. Keith Miller doesn't always trust the fluency of his visual language, occasionally forcing a point that's already being captured.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Leaves us moved by poignant scenes of victims' shattered lives, but, for reasons unclear, keeps the bullies themselves largely out of our reach.
  15. Pooh's moral triumph isn't all that weighty, but it's almost existentially profound to see the silly old bear forgo honey a little while longer because of someone else's needs.
  16. Lacking both spiritual and narrative spark, Vera Farmiga's directorial debut suffers from her flat performance and a moribund, weirdly sex-joke-spiked narrative.
  17. The film's empowering themes of feminine strengths and bonds eventually flourish in novel fashion.
  18. Its looseness adequately portrays Plimpton as an inwardly conflicted figure, but it fails to make much of a case for his legacy outside of The Paris Review's still-noticeable brand.
  19. The film's highly calculated beauty suffocates rather than elevates the story's emotional underpinnings.
  20. It's the rare film that should not introduce new story elements or characters past its first act. In Darkness, a garbage movie applying for unlimited credit on the most meager collateral, is that film.
  21. Underlying the occasionally harrowing, consistently mournful tone is a philosophy that, more than being explicitly anti-capital punishment, puts both family ties and the social contract at the center of people's self-worth.
  22. The film is most interesting as an articulation of how its main character's initial status as an emblem of inter-religious understanding quickly dissolves following a suicide bombing.
  23. It would be inaccurate to call Happy People: A Year in the Taiga the newest Werner Herzog film.
  24. Anton Corbijn constructs a stifling world of shadowy surveillance and intersecting national interests, building on John Le Carré's sense of moral and emotional exhaustion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    It works as a reminder of the important interactiveness of the performing arts, of actors evoking the drama, action, and emotion that computers and machines cannot.
  25. Moussa Touré's worldview, like Ousmane Sembene's, is characterized by the feeling that, at the end of the day, some degree of loss or defeat is inevitable.
  26. Possibly year's most immaculate-looking drivel, a prismatically shot whodunit abundant in red herrings, but lacking in moral contemplation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As great and intimate as Live at Massey Hall 1971 may be, it's not as transportive as this filming of a Neil Young performance at the venue 30 years later.

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