Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,673 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Hard to Be a God
Lowest review score: 0 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace
Score distribution:
2,673 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A four-year study of an Afghan war-bound group of friends (the mother of Cole, the goofy joker of the group, compares the boys to the characters in The Deer Hunter), Courtney's documentary is equal parts heartfelt and public-television predictable.
  1. For most of the film's running time, one mistakes the main character's callousness for the filmmakers'.
  2. For much of its runtime, the film is simply there, decent for the most part, but at no point immersive.
  3. Stuart Murdoch clearly knows quite a bit about crafting pop tunes, but the film's consideration of the work of songwriting is totally flippant.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Even if this Haruki Murakami adaptation amounts to a gorgeous but lethargic emo ballad, there's no denying the stately lyricism of its melancholy.
  4. Throughout To the Wonder, the new and old are incessantly twinned, blurred into a package that suggests an experimental dance piece.
  5. Only a few snippets escape the uncritical narcissism that the film celebrates and, despite their unimaginative employment, they stand as something of a rebuke to the film's dominant images.
  6. Writer-director Charles Martin Smith's tin ear for dialogue and contrived symbolism is as unmistakable as his enormous heart.
  7. What works about the film can largely be attributed to the original text, which is full of cruel twists and savage blows that Tracy Letts wisely retains for the screen.
  8. Chad Crawford Kinkle impressively imbues this supernatural world of backwoods mysticism with a plausible milieu while still staying committed to the film's own brewing insanity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Half-formed expressions of disappointment, hope, struggle, confusion, and boyish playfulness on faces otherwise marked by youth's inexperience, and a self-consciousness brought on by the curiosity of being filmed, constitute the most memorable moments of Lads & Jockeys, a documentary on 14-year-old aspiring jockeys in France.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Diamond-hard and dazzlingly brilliant, David Cronenberg's film plays like a deeply perverse, darkly comic successor to Videodrome.
  9. If the Footloose remake had its own signature dance, it'd be called the Push-Pull, as this hip-to-be-sorta-square movie, much like the small-town teens within it, has a mind for propelling itself toward a progressive future while continually being yanked back by cherished hallmarks of the past.
  10. The film's weird mix of dollhouse dread and fashion-magazine chic can be fetching, but it's nothing if not vacuous, a series of disjointed, improvisatory riffs that recall the brazen aesthetic overload of Amer.
  11. Whatever predictable plot the film tries to unfold never lives up to the excitement of its conceptual gimmick.
  12. Clint Eastwood makes his infamous chair speech look like chapter one of a season of self-parody.
  13. Far more concerned with pratfalling animal shenanigans and unearned uplift than crafting a single complex or amusing moment, it's a film caged in by formulaic plotting and plentiful pap.
  14. While Jonathan Lisecki is well in tune with his film's niche market, his knack for comedy, both visual and verbal, is universally hilarious.
  15. Its episodic nature poses a narrative challenge that director Josh Aronson's just barely feature-length documentary can't quite surmount.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like a stiff Schwarzeneggerian conqueror making good on an "I'll be back," John Hyams returns to one-up the franchise again.
  16. As a film about social issues, and simply being yourself, it's commendably progressive, going so far as serving as a kind of coming-out story.
  17. Its dolly- and crane-operated polish points toward an acquiescence to Tinseltown mores, which until now Baron Cohen hovered cheekily above.
  18. Handsomely mounted and shot with an eye for nocturnal Parisian mystery by Guillaume Schiffman, Gainsbourg somewhat mercifully peters out after the grande scandale of the provocateur's reggae version of "La Marseillaise," which earned him the wrath of French patriots.
  19. The film rarely takes us past its rather obvious conclusions about the potential bestial nature of kids and how that may translate to the larger battlefields.
  20. Its greatest asset, and another trait it shares with Mann and Fincher's work, is a careful attention toward the particulars of its milieu in a way that doesn't call attention to those period touches.
  21. Eventually, the film's impressive array of formal pyrotechnics overwhelms its morals.
  22. By turns abrasive and stately, sermonic and impartial, plot-heavy and meandering, often within seconds of each other.
  23. The Prey doesn't have the obsessive pull of a great thriller, as it's undeniably an impersonal toy, but it's a hell of a toy.
  24. When Jérôme Bonnell allows his two magnificent leads to work at the sparse dialogue, he invokes a powerful, elemental sense of frank, sexual discussion and high-end flirtation, imbuing the relationships with a maturity that's loathsomely rare in films today.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    More like an attempt to reenergize a franchise than rebottle the lightning that electrified the original.

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