Slate's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,486 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Chicago
Lowest review score: 0 The Amityville Horror
Score distribution:
1,486 movie reviews
  1. Munich is the most potent, the most vital, the best movie of the year.
  2. I don't just mean it's one of the best movies of the past six years. Children of Men, based on the 1992 novel by P.D. James, is the movie of the millennium because it's about our millennium, with its fractured, fearful politics and random bursts of violence and terror.
  3. An absolutely magical fusion of deadpan Ealing comedy and Gothic horror.
  4. This is the best movie I've seen in a decade. For once it's no hyperbole to say, "Unforgettable!"
  5. The rare film about the life of an artist that is itself a work of art.
  6. A completely different kind of animated movie that, even more than "Ratatouille," reimagines what the medium can do.
  7. On first viewing, Crazy Heart seemed like a pretty good movie with one great performance. After a second time through, it's sneaking up on the title of my favorite film of the year.
  8. Feels fresher, leaner, and faster than any action movie in years.
  9. American satire rarely comes more winning than Election, an exuberantly caustic comedy that shows the symbiotic relationship between political go-get-'em-ism and moral backsliding.
  10. Asghar Farhadi's A Separation serves as a quiet reminder of how good it's possible for movies to be.
  11. A collage of pain that breaks over you like a wave. Every second you can feel the cost to Caouette of what he's showing: The sounds and the images are like a pipeline from his unconscious to the screen.
  12. If you're interested in the history of the human race-if you're a member of the human race-you owe it to yourself to see this movie.
  13. Qualifies as one of my favorite movies of all time. This 1932 masterpiece, now digitally restored with retranslated subtitles and a newly recorded score, is a silent film that doesn't feel silent at all.
  14. Gus Van Sant and screenwriter Dustin Lance Black pull off something very close to magic. They make a film that's both historically precise and as graceful, unpredictable, and moving as a good fiction film--that is to say, a work of art.
    • Slate
  15. For a story that's all about the harnessing of fateful chthonic forces, Paul Thomas Anderson has dug deeper than ever before, and struck black gold.
  16. Ida
    There’s an urgency to Ida’s simple, elemental story that makes it seem timely, or maybe just timeless.
  17. I loved it. Or, to put it another way, I loved it, I loved it, I loved it. I loved every gorgeous sick disgusting ravishing overbaked blood-spurting artificial frame of it.
  18. The fact that Duvall gives such a glorious performance in The Apostle is likely to distract people from the fact that he has also written and directed a glorious movie--the most vivid and radiantly made of 1997.
  19. You don't want to watch this movie, you want to climb inside it and play.
  20. The movie we've been waiting for all year: a comedy that doesn't take cheap shots, a drama that doesn't manipulate, a movie of ideas that doesn't preach. It's a rich, layered, juicy film, with quiet revelations punctuated by big laughs.
  21. The Babadook creates tension not with jump scares or chase sequences but with judicious editing and slow-burn suspense—that is, until it descends into a final half-hour of harrowing emotional and physical intensity, an extended climax that made me gasp aloud, hide my eyes, and weep at least twice.
  22. As the couple’s widening rift exposes the gender and class assumptions that underlie their marriage... Force Majeure morphs into a biting critique of modern masculinity, of traditional parenting roles, and possibly of the institution of marriage itself.
  23. A clever, vividly imagined, consistently funny, eye-poppingly pretty and oddly profound movie … about Legos.
  24. This is the most intoxicatingly beautiful martial arts picture I've ever seen.
  25. It's hard to think of another American film with this range of moods: satirical, sometimes hilarious, yet suffused with a sense of loss and riddled with the kind of violence that makes you recoil and lean forward simultaneously.
  26. Watching the opening of A Hard Day's Night is like getting a direct injection of happiness.
  27. Mr. Turner does resemble "Topsy-Turvy" in its meticulous yet vibrant recreation of the past and its ever-expanding thematic amplitude. This is a movie not only about one particular artist, but about art as both a field of human endeavor and an object of shifting cultural and economic value.
  28. Brilliantly nasty little horror film.
  29. Master and Commander hooks you from its nifty opening salvo to its nifty closing punch line.
  30. May not be the single best movie I've seen so far this year--though it's certainly a contender for the title--but it's without doubt the most surprising.

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