St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 464 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Felicity: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Black Box: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 324
  2. Negative: 0 out of 324
324 tv reviews
  1. The mystery is wonderfully intriguing; the performances are excellent, especially from Maslany but also from Jordan Gavaris as her foster brother and best friend, Felix.
  2. Once it relaxes, however, Scrubs turns out to be a thoughtful show that has dispensed with a laugh track and proves amusing enough not to need one. (Now, let's dispense with those fantasies.) Shot with a single camera in a former hospital, it aims for the exaggerated realism and the light-meets-dark tone of "M*A*S*H" -- a worthy ambition even if it doesn't get there. [2 Oct 2001, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. Long on scenery and even longer on schmaltz. The kids are fine; Gregory Smith is the show's strongest link as complicated, 15-year-old Ephram, and Vivian Cardone ("A Beautiful Mind") is off-the-scale adorable as 9-year-old Delia. But Williams' conversion to small-town doctor seems forced, and so do the quirks of Everwood residents. It's nothing that a prescription for better writing couldn't fix, however. [16 Sept 2002, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  4. The best cop show of any recent season...It's not for everyone, but it is for anyone who still misses "Homicide" and thinks "NYPD Blue" long ago devolved into soap opera. [10 Mar 2002, p.F2]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  5. Twists that are genuinely surprising, plus quirky humor, separate Top of the Lake from, say, AMC’s “The Killing,” which was also deliberately paced but unrelentingly dour as well.
  6. But most importantly, Spin City should be a hit because of Fox, who's never been more likable than he is here. [17 Sept 1996, p.6D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  7. Gosh, I love this show. Meet Felicity and prepare to fall in love. [29 Sept 1998]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  8. Bates Motel builds psychological scares rather than spooking us with haunted-house cliches. Following these characters to the end we can see coming should be a fascinating journey.
  9. Hugh Laurie is cranky, scathingly honest, brilliant Dr. Gregory House, whose amazing diagnostic abilities almost make up for his abrasive personality, in the Fox medical drama House. [16 Nov 2004, p.E06]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  10. Vikings is full of fighting, impaling, beheading and all that fun stuff. The hope is clearly to draw "Game of Thrones" fans, but it's not that good.
  11. Adapted from a Dutch series that was surely better than this, Red Widow is trite and tedious.
  12. I suspect that viewers who know the Bible well will be annoyed by "The Bible," while those who are casual students will be alternately mildly entertained and fairly bored. People with no religious beliefs probably won't watch anyway, but if they do, they could wind up confused or amused.
  13. Leeves is a hoot as Daphne, and provides leavening to Mahoney's self-centered gruffness. This could all work out, I guess; these characters (except possibly Dad) could grow on us, and in the post-"Seinfeld" time slot, they're likely to get a chance. [16 Sept 1993, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  14. All the characters lie on the couch a lot. While it's noted that they do have jobs, they seem to spend most of their time eating Oreos and watching TV. (Hey, that's my life. . . .) And they talk, but most of what they have to say isn't very funny. [22 Sept 1994, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  15. Absorbing as the show promises to be, Sunday night's opener is something of a disappointment because it basically rewrites the Martha Moxley murder case, the details of which are very familiar from the recent Michael Skakel trial. [28 Sept 2003, p.C5]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  16. Somebody tell the creators of shows like this, please, that viewers want engaging characters and entertaining, absorbing storytelling. We really don't need to be whooshing around in time while our heads spin.
  17. Parade's End is often sad and even grim, full of complicated personalities who are more fascinating than likable. But the miniseries is engrossing in its portrait of two people stuck in roles they need to cast aside, but somehow unable to make the break.
  18. The absence of the familiar law-order yin-yang gives the spin-off its own identity, but in the beginning it feels like a loss...What may turn out to sink this sharply written, well-acted show, however, is the premise itself. The prospect of tuning in every week to confront a creepy new sex crime, with most of the victims women and children, simply isn't very appealing. [20 Sept 1999, p.E6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  19. A right-on time capsule of a decade, a warm coming-of-age comedy and the funniest new sitcom on any network this fall. [23 Aug 1998, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  20. Riveting, distinctive television that is totally entertaining, in the broadest sense of the word. [8 Apr 1990, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  21. Knepper is wonderfully creepy. But that's the last of the good news. From Rockne S. O'Bannon, Cult is too complicated for its own good, and not satisfying enough to make it worth figuring out.
  22. A quirky mix of light and dark, humor and grit, sentiment and substance -- "The O.C." if scripted by Raymond Chandler. [21 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  23. Freaks and Geeks is a grittier "Wonder Years," while retaining some of that show's sweetness. The writing is sharp, and the young stars are vividly, awkwardly real. Spending an hour with them is almost worth going back to high school again. [24 Sept 1999, p.E10]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  24. Some UFO cliches - bright lights, mysterious marks, lost time - turn up here (could they be cliches because they're...true?), but intelligent writing and sharp plotting lift the series far above the standard for the genre. The lead characters have a quirky chemistry that (refreshingly) isn't built on the "squabble and kiss" standard. (They're both pretty appealing, however, and if they should eventually kiss, I for one wouldn't mind.) [9 Sept 1993, p.06G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  25. Lost is a sci-fi soap opera adventure -- with humor, mystery and interesting characters galore...It's "Survivor" with the one thing "Survivor" lacks -- a terrific script.
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  26. The first episode does explain the premise pretty clearly--if you pay close enough attention and aren't laughing too hard.
  27. The Job, with Lisa Ling as host, is taped in front of a live audience, which keeps it from being too downbeat. The interviewers are honest but encouraging, and even those who are eliminated are told precisely why and given advice about other opportunities.
  28. The cases often seem more obvious than intriguing; the emotions feel forced; much of the dialogue is trite. The cast is unusually diverse, and that's worthy of high praise.
  29. Do No Harm expects us to accept the dual-personality premise without grounding it in anything believable.
  30. The Americans isn't just a heart-pounding action drama; by presenting heroes who are also villains, it also confronts viewers with TV's deepest moral dilemma since "The Sopranos."

Top Trailers