St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,029 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Red Riding Trilogy
Lowest review score: 25 Marmaduke
Score distribution:
1,029 movie reviews
  1. Black Swan is ridiculously over the top, but in a way that makes it fascinating to watch.
  2. As Refn is riffing on thriller cliches, he gets solid support from the ensemble. Brooks, a comedic standout since the '70s, makes a sympathetic villain, and Gosling stokes the young-Brando comparisons - instead of settling for Richard Gere.
  3. As the wife to a wolf of Wall Street, Blanchett shows us a lost sheep both before and after the slaughter. It’s not a pretty picture, but it’s twitching with life.
  4. Sophisticated comedies have gone out of fashion, largely because Hollywood finds it easier and more profitable to simply gross out moviegoers. But Please Give has real class -- and for that it deserves our gratitude.
  5. The conclusion of Christopher Nolan's superhero trilogy is a hugely ambitious mix of eye candy and brain food. If it doesn't have the haunting aftertaste of the previous serving, that's only because Nolan couldn't clone Heath Ledger. But beefy substitute Tom Hardy is a hell of a villain.
  6. Like its neo-noir kin across the pond, The Guard is violent, profane and funny. But McDonagh is interested in more than mockery.
  7. Whether on stage or the screen, Much Ado About Nothing is a pleasure that passes like a midsummer night’s dream.
  8. Superbly acted, and a return to form for Tavernier, who guided jazz legend Dexter Gordon to an Oscar nomination for "'Round Midnight" (1986).
  9. While we await the definitive documentary about the glut of garbage, Waste Land reduces this global catastrophe to touchingly human scale.
  10. Of all the films to come out the conflict, Afghan Star is the most provocative, because its message that people are essentially the same is a dubious, double-edge sword.
  11. Iowa-native Gurira has had roles in TV’s “Treme” and “The Walking Dead,” but Mother of George should be the birth of a brilliant film career.
  12. In recording the timeless traditions of Jewry, he created a new one: the identity crisis that rides on the back of laughter.
  13. The success of the three, separately screened films -- the first set in 1974, the second in 1980 and the concluding segment in 1983 -- depends not on their specifics, but on their ability to sustain an atmosphere that's appropriate to the dark but haunting story.
  14. As an exercise in craft, it's surprisingly successful, thanks to the strong cast and the vivid depiction of a modern leader's security apparatus. But as a political statement or personal drama, The Ghost Writer is nearly invisible.
  15. One of the best films of the year.
  16. In a movie of murky surfaces and deep loneliness, the redemptive surprise of A Single Man is how it becomes a clear endorsement of the Buddy System.
  17. The Messenger is the debut film of writer and director Oren Moverman, but it's worldly wise, with two well-rounded characters.
  18. Gleeson is great as the troubled, conscientious priest, but until an abruptly shocking finale, his fatalism turns the ticking clock into a congested hourglass.
  19. Mostly the movie is about process and perspective. Through the documentary lens, Richter's enigmatic paintings speak to us.
  20. Just when this black-and-white, microbudget movie seems poised to spring an indictment of the Dickensian social order, it ends, but in a redemptive ray of color.
  21. Duvall is a powerful actor, and this folksy fable could have been a career-capping feat, but the movie is toothless and slow.
  22. The Immigrant is not unlike a Prohibition-era “Taxi Driver,” with Cotillard as the apprentice hooker, Phoenix as the sweet-talking pimp and Jeremy Renner (playing the theater’s magician, Orlando) as the would-be savior.
  23. An artfully observant and unexpectedly moving documentary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While Career Girls has an overall somber tone, it is sparked by Leigh's humor and the actresses' - particularly Hannah's - verbal quickness... While the film may not be very satisfying to viewers, it is intriguing to watch Leigh's work and to see the women's characters develop. [22 Aug. 1997, p.6E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  24. Cunningham's answers to pointed questions about romantic love and religious faith are so open-hearted, we understand that he's bigger than just New York.
  25. Broken Embraces is stylish and sly, an engaging exercise that gives us less than meets the eye.
  26. The film is so masterfully controlled, we feel like we’ve eavesdropped on something like life.
  27. Despite accusations of nearly succumbing to spotlighting beefs over beats, the film comes off as an honest representation of a great group that's not to be forgotten.
  28. When a place and its people are this stylish, we can't help but be drawn to them.
  29. With a child’s perspective on war, Lore deserves comparisons with “Empire of the Sun” and “Hope and Glory,” and with a feisty female protagonist it stands virtually alone.

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